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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I lowered my bars a tad bit as I felt they were a tad high for me but now my seat is hurting my perineum when in the drop position. Would the best fix be to tilt the seat forward a bit?
 

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Level seems to be the general guideline but you should check out the John Howard bike fit videos on youtube.

He argues that saddle tilt should be .5 degrees down as I recall. Even if you don't agree, his discussion of proper "pelvic rotation" is worthwhile.

He also has a good way to set the levers on your bars.

There are 5 diffierent video parts so give yourself some time to look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
StellaBlue said:
You say you lowered them a bit ? Try lowering you seat post the same amount . Although it may create other issues . Only you can find a nice balance through trial and error . I don't think we can be much help .
Not lowered as in lower, but rotated them forward a bit (not sure of the terminology)
 

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advice...

So far, you've got a some questionable advice. If you rotated the bars so the brake hoods are lower, then the nose of the saddle may need to be tilted down. The problem with a lot of seatpost that only have a single boilt clamping mechanism is they relly on serrations that do not permit very fine adjustment. One notch nose-dowm might be too much. That's why I always buy a seatpost that has a 2-bolt mechanism that permits very small angle adjustments.

You should never change the saddle height becasue you lowered the bars. Get the saddle height correct, then adjust the bar height to suit your needs.
 

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Probably not. The most likely outcome of tilting the saddle down is to make you slide down onto the narrow nose of the saddle more, increasing the pressure you aim to avoid.

Instead, consider your body's relationship to your bottom bracket. Ideally, in lowering your bars, you would retain the same basic posture but rotate yourself around the BB a few degrees. What that means is that your saddle needs to go forward and up very slightly.

That sounds wrong to a lot of folks, because of a pervasive (and completely baseless) misunderstanding of KOPS. And it's also important to note that 'raising' the saddle is a result of trig. The goal is to retain the same distance between the contact point of the saddle (back on the wide spot where the sit bones go) and the bottom bracket. Simply sliding the seat forward on the rails shortens that distance(a result of the seat tube angle), so a nudge upward is required to compensate.

Of course, all that assumes that your initial position was worth a flake. If not, meh. Fiddle around 'till you find something that works. It's free, after all.
 
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