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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I purchase the spin doctor wheel truing stand but performance did not have the dishing tool. Being the person that I am, I tried truing my wheels anyways and I'm concerned about the dish of the wheels. I flipped the wheels according to some suggestions and the wheel still rubs on one side, but that could be from the plastic on top the tube being completely loose and the wheel is not sitting correctly in the stand.

Anyone on the Northside of Chicago 'Andersonville' willing to lend a hand or should I just purchase the dishing tool?
 

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Never in my life owned a dishing tool. Waste of money. Just insert (into your stand) what you know is a properly dished wheel, set the side adjustments to that wheel and, viola, your wheel will dish fine.

Then again, I own bunches of wheels in every configuration...
 

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dookie said:
as a shop, what's the best way to increase your service revenues?

hand out free spoke wrenches.
Too effin funny, man!:p

I wrenched in a few shops long ago, so my experience allows me to do more than the average joe. We saw many DIYer jobs that went awry. That would be a good topic to start on here. I'm sure many shop mechanics could produce some laughers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
fast ferd said:
Never in my life owned a dishing tool. Waste of money. Just insert (into your stand) what you know is a properly dished wheel, set the side adjustments to that wheel and, viola, your wheel will dish fine.

Then again, I own bunches of wheels in every configuration...
I'll try that.


Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ligero said:
Put it in your bike and see if the wheel is centered. If it not it will show you which way you need to dish it.
Did that but I don't trust my eyes 'I wear rx glasses' and It looks like my brakes were off center a little. ? Aren't the pads suppose to contact the sides of the rim at the same time? What's with the uneven wear on my pads?
 

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Big macho tough wheelmen don't need no steenkin' dishing-gauges!

But intelligent wheelbuilder should have one. Takes out any guess work for such possibilities as the wheel you're using as a guide is ALSO out of dish. I first learned to use them through Harris Cyclery - which was Sheldon Brown's old haunt. They all used them. They did, and still do, believe in being sure they do things right the first time. The one I'd recommend is here:

http://bike-nashbar.amazonwebstore.com/Park-Consumer-Wheel-Dishing-Gauge/M/B0006JHXRI.htm

Might be cheaper elsewhere, so hunt.

Good luck!
 

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What to center

crash11 said:
Did that but I don't trust my eyes 'I wear rx glasses' and It looks like my brakes were off center a little. ? Aren't the pads suppose to contact the sides of the rim at the same time? What's with the uneven wear on my pads?
You center the wheel in the frame/fork, not in the brakes. This is because the brakes may not be centered, and can easily be changed. With the rear wheel, you have two places you can check for centering: the seat stays and the chain stays. Just make sure that the wheel is fully settled in the frame; set the bike on the ground and release the QR lever so that bot sides of the hub axle are touching the dropouts. Once you have the wheel centered, then you adjust the brakes so that the pads touch the rim simultaneously on both sides as you apply the brakes. If your pads have worn asymmetrically, it suggests that one side was dragging on the rim, or that the brakes have been seriously off center for a long time.
 

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Install a zip tie on the chainstay or fork. Cut it and leave a tail so that you can rotate it to touch the rim.

Now turn your bicycle upside down and rest it on the floor (high-tech workstand). Move the zip until it touches the rim perfectly. Now flip the wheel around and put it back in the dropouts. if it doesn't touch, this is is the short dish side. if it rubs hard on the brake track, dish the other side.

repeat until you can flip both wheels and the zip brushes the rim track of your wheel, both sides, the same.
 

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fast ferd said:
Never in my life owned a dishing tool. Waste of money. Just insert (into your stand) what you know is a properly dished wheel, set the side adjustments to that wheel and, viola, your wheel will dish fine..
I think that stand is the same as the one I have labeled as a Minoura. It's a bit wobbly, so as you take wheels in and out of it, it wiggles around a bit. You can do it though, just takes a little more time and patience.

Clamp down QR on the plastic bit fairly snug while pressing/pulling the wheel into the stand, and the way the wheel sits will be more consistent.

Gotta bite the bullet and buy the $200 Park some day.
 

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crash11 said:
Ok, so I purchase the spin doctor wheel truing stand but performance did not have the dishing tool. Being the person that I am, I tried truing my wheels anyways and I'm concerned about the dish of the wheels. I flipped the wheels according to some suggestions and the wheel still rubs on one side, but that could be from the plastic on top the tube being completely loose and the wheel is not sitting correctly in the stand.

Anyone on the Northside of Chicago 'Andersonville' willing to lend a hand or should I just purchase the dishing tool?
If you really, really want one, make one for free from cardboard, as shown in Roger Musson's wheelbuilding e-book.

I don't use one (like most people). I use a pair of cheap inside calipers to gauge the distance from rim to chainstay on the bike. I used it today and it works perfectly.
 
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