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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently got a Supersix with the Fizik Arione and have a few questions about getting a comfortable saddle position. My old bike had some cheap, Bontrager saddle with no cutout but a significant amount of padding and I didn't ever have any significant issues with it.

Is there a tried and true tip to tweaking this saddle? Does it do well with the nose slightly tilted down? I know the side profile changes throughout the saddle (ie from back to the front).

I'm wondering if I need to tweak this to get it comfortable or if it's just the wrong saddle for me. I literally just got it so I don't want to start an endless search for a good saddle if I can either: 1. adapt to the saddle or 2. tweak it just a bit to find a comfortable position.

FWIW: I'm 6'1" and 140lbs (very slightly built).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That seemed to help a little with the genital compression, but the sit bones still feel sore... Is dropping the front 2/3rds a little going to help or make it worse or are my hip bones not right for this saddle?
 

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Every photo I've seen of the saddle is significantly tilted down in the front 2/3rds
I wouldn't go by those photos; if you notice the rails are perfectly level, that means the photographer put the saddle down on a flat surface to conveniently photograph it, not to show the correct position of the saddle.

For me personally, the perfect levelling for any member of the Arione family (I have Std and R3 versions) is like so:
View attachment 281907
 

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I wouldn't go by those photos; if you notice the rails are perfectly level, that means the photographer put the saddle down on a flat surface to conveniently photograph it, not to show the correct position of the saddle.

For me personally, the perfect levelling for any member of the Arione family (I have Std and R3 versions) is like so:
View attachment 281904
Link is dead, we can't see the picture...
 

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Infaredz are you flexible or have a aggressive poistion? I only find my arione comfortable when I'm in the hoods or drops (reaching far). When I'm upright the saddle is incredibly uncomfortable. The tip of mine is also slightly pointed down. I'm pretty much the same build as you too, 125 and 5"11'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Infaredz are you flexible or have a aggressive poistion? I only find my arione comfortable when I'm in the hoods or drops (reaching far). When I'm upright the saddle is incredibly uncomfortable. The tip of mine is also slightly pointed down. I'm pretty much the same build as you too, 125 and 5"11'.
I wouldn't call myself flexible (ie. my drop is about 1.5-2inches) but my experience seems to be the same as yours. That's going to be a killer for climbs...
 

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I recently got a Supersix with the Fizik Arione and have a few questions about getting a comfortable saddle position. My old bike had some cheap, Bontrager saddle with no cutout but a significant amount of padding and I didn't ever have any significant issues with it.

FWIW: I'm 6'1" and 140lbs (very slightly built).
Just use your old seat, or buy an identical one for your new bike.
 

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My new bike came equipped with the Arione CX. Comfort has been increasing with each ride as I.......

A) Move the saddle forward
B) Tilt it downwards slightly

I think I've got it dialed in now. The key was to get my sit bones on the back portion of the seat.
 

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I have one of those saddles now. At first I made the saddle level but that didn't work, so I turned down the nose just a touch and everything was good. That is my favorite non leather saddle. I don't find it uncomfortable in any position. Not sure if it matters but I'm 60 years old, 6', and 163 pounds.
 

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That seemed to help a little with the genital compression, but the sit bones still feel sore... Is dropping the front 2/3rds a little going to help or make it worse or are my hip bones not right for this saddle?
Saddle comfort and adjustment:

There are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important

2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

4) easing up - you want to lift your rear end off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, and cleat position.

6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.

When choosing a new saddle, width is important but so are a number of other things and it really is not possible to recommend a saddle that works based on width alone. The shape of the saddle butt, width of the nose, thickness and density of padding, etc. all factor in.

The standard advice to cure numbness is to tip the nose down, but having discussed this topic many times, it seems that some people do not sit properly on their saddles. You need to have a saddle and saddle position that has your sit bones on the butt of the saddle. If your saddle nose is tipped down too far, it may cause you to slide forward. If it is tipped up too far, it may be causing pressure. And if you can't get things right in between these points, it may be that you are not sitting in the right spot or that the saddle doesn't fit you. In my experience, the range of saddle tilt goes from "nose level" to saddle level. Nose level means that for most saddles, the butt of the saddle is slightly elevated (this is how I ride). Saddle level means that a level placed on the saddle would have the nose and butt level, which may create a hammock effect in the middle. If your saddle is "flat" and doesn't have a raised butt relative to the nose, then the "level" concept applies to the entire length of the saddle, not just the nose. Your personal comfort has to rule on where to place things in this range. Also, fore/aft position can influence comfort - it is a trade-off between pedaling style and the how much you lean on the bars vs. sit on the saddle.
 

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If after changing the angle of the saddle a tad doesn't work then maybe the saddle is a bit too high, try lowering the saddle by an 1/4th of an inch and retest.

If the sit bones still hurt then it's possible the saddle may be too narrow for you. Simply find a saddle a bit wider then that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks to those who offered help and suggestions. I tried these and, as I was professionally fit when I got the bike, I will say that I think my sit bones are too wide/narrow for this saddle. For the poster who suggested I use my old saddle, I can't (it's gone). Also, they don't even make it anymore because it was 10ish years old.

I've read there is a test of sorts to determine your sit bone width. Can someone tell me how to do this?

Also, is it reasonable to take my bike to a LBS and ask to try a few saddles before I purchase one? It seems reasonable to me seeing as it's a 150 dollar purchase, but then again, I can also see a comment like "Well yes, but that only comes with a bike fit. They're $250 and are done by a professional."
 

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Thanks to those who offered help and suggestions. I tried these and, as I was professionally fit when I got the bike, I will say that I think my sit bones are too wide/narrow for this saddle. For the poster who suggested I use my old saddle, I can't (it's gone). Also, they don't even make it anymore because it was 10ish years old.

I've read there is a test of sorts to determine your sit bone width. Can someone tell me how to do this?

Also, is it reasonable to take my bike to a LBS and ask to try a few saddles before I purchase one? It seems reasonable to me seeing as it's a 150 dollar purchase, but then again, I can also see a comment like "Well yes, but that only comes with a bike fit. They're $250 and are done by a professional."
it's not really a test, but you can measure your sit bones one of two ways, either have some one help you by using a tape measure and they measure the distance from bony sit bone protrusion to the other; or take a block of styrofoam an sit on it naked with full weight bearing on the block, then look at the block and there should be two indentations were the sit bones were, measure those. Take the measurements in and find a set that will allow the sit bones to sit on the flats on the saddle NOT on the downward slopes.

No, it does not come with a bike fit you can do this on your own. Even after getting the measurements you can still run into issues of the saddle not being to your liking...unfortunately that's life. Hopefully a LBS will allow you to try a saddle for a couple of days with the right to return in exchange for another (using those measurements to get the right width again).

There are only usually two different widths anyways offered in saddles, so if the narrower size hurts go up to the wider size. Usually when sit bones hurt is that the sit bones are not sitting on the flats and are instead on the downward slopes of the padding thus the saddle is too narrow. Now if your bony like me then after about 50 miles your butt will hurt anyways, this means your not allowing your self to get off the saddle for a minute or two while riding about every 15 to 20 minutes, and it means you may need better padded shorts with probably gel inserts instead of foam.
 

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I ultimately got rid of this saddle as I could not alleviate the pressure on my perineum. I found the seat too 'flat' through the middle and could never get comfortable, although it helped significantly when my sit bones were taking the brunt of my weight. This was effectively at the widest part of the saddle, not quite all the way back.
 
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