Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all! So I have a slight dilemma. I just recently got into cycling about a month and a half ago(I purchased a Giant OCR2 and have been riding it every other day.) The problem is, I need a bike for school and I don't think it's a good idea for my to bring my Giant to school. I'm interested in getting a fixed gear for transportation on campus and for a nice break from the road bike. I have heard some super things about the Kilo TT but it seems like it's sold out everywhere. I would love to just buy a frame and build it up myself but I honestly have NO knowledge whatsoever regarding building bikes. I'm afraid I would destroy the bike. Does anyone know a guide for building a bike from the frame and fork? Or could anyone recommend a book? Right now I am looking at a $400 limit on my fixed gear.

I saw the Windsor on Bikes Direct, but building it at home makes me a little weary. I would love to go for a pake frame and build up something myself but like I said, I honestly have no clue what I am doing. Could someone recommend a website or a bike for me to look at within the 400 range? Thanks much!
 

·
hello
Joined
·
3,395 Posts
I you have no wrenching skills it's best to buy complete as you've been thinking about. You can learn by tinkering on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
If you only have $400, you'll get a better deal buying a complete bike than trying to build one up. Also, if you've never worked on a bike before, you probably don't have the tools you need. Do you have a headset press? A cheap one will cost you $50, and if you don't know how to use it, you can screw up the frame. Find a club to ride with, and you can probably meet some folks who would be happy to teach you the mechanical stuff, and if you're nice, they may let you come over and borrow tools.

Also, SE makes some solid single speed bikes for not much money. The SE Draft retails for about $250.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
FatTireFred said:
spend a little more... se with its 1-pc crank = doo doo
Thanks for the suggestions! I was going to buy the pake frame and fork, but yeah it probably wouldn't be cost efficient vs. a complete bike, and I could seriously screw something up. I would love some more suggestions on a good pike for under 400 dollars. Thanks again!
 

·
duh...
Joined
·
9,749 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
FatTireFred said:
:thumbsup: On Bikesdirect.com. I have a Motobecane Messenger from them and I must say it is an impressive bargain. I did swap out some fit related parts, but didn't really have to. I've had it for about 1 1/2 years with no issues. The bike came quick and pretty much assembled (as best as could be in a shipping box) requiring very little assembly. The only thing that really needed upgrading was the headset, any unit will be an upgrade there. The drivetrain and wheels are better than expected.

As far as the bike goes, I was more than satisfied with the overall quality of it and how it rides, and It is quite good looking too.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I wouldn't get sizing advice from the internet. None of us has seen your proportions or knows what your preferences are. Look up (or measure) the specs on your Giant and, assuming you like the fit of that bike, start looking for a bike that has similar geometry. If there is something about that bike's geometry that you don't like, go to your local bike shop(s) and tell them what exactly you don't like and they should be able to offer some suggestions.

Look specifically at the effective top tube length and the seat tube length. Even though bikes are "sized" using the length of the seat tube, the effective top tube length is a more important dimension. Also make sure that you are comparing apples to apples--seat tube length can be measured from the center of the bottom bracket to the center of the top tube, from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the top tube, and from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the seat tube. The effective top tube length can be the same as the actual top tube length (in the case of a more traditional, horizontal bar frame), or different from the actual top tube length (in the case of compact frames or sloping top tubes).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay, I'm about the bite the bullet and buy the Windsor the Hour...but I just thought about something...Is it really difficult to use a fixie on school campuses(Crowds of people, etc.)? That is my main purpose for this bike + just some cruising. My campus is a pretty crowded campus, so I will probably put on a brake(I will post again when I need help with that) but for on campus...would a fixed gear be a good idea, or would something else be better for under 400?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,776 Posts
.Is it really difficult to use a fixie on school campuses(Crowds of people, etc.)? .would a fixed gear be a good idea, or would something else be better for under 400?
Have you ever ridden fixed? You might want to try to find a way to get in a ride or two (maybe a shop can lend you a bike?) and find out whether you really like it first. It's odd, and kind of an acquired taste, and not everyone likes it. Some people really prefer the SS (freewheel), and that is arguably the most practical flat-terrain utility bike.

That said, if you like fixed and get the hang of it, a FG is terrific for maneuvering in tight spaces with crowds (but it helps to have a brake, and use it). The low-speed control is one of its great virtues. If you get good at it, you really can ride at a slow walk speed when necessary.

Does that bike come with a flip-flop hub? You could get an inexpensive freewheel and try both ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top