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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All-

My father (an old time cyclist) suggested to me that if you look down while riding in your normal (non-tired) cycling position, your handlebars should hide the front hub on a road bike.

Now, whether or not this is an accurate way to measure basic bike fit... do you test this when you're on the tops, on the hoods, or in the drops? Because all of those positions have different results. From the limited search I did, some seem to say drops, others hoods.
 

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It's on the hoods for me,that's what you mostly read around on the internet. It may be an obsolete formula for many but it worked out perfectly for my needs and it's been the first time I've used it a month ago for my new bike :thumbsup:.
 

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I'm old and I remember that guideline too. Right after we did the standover test. :eek:

In the hoods in your normal riding position was the word.
 

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Hey All-

My father (an old time cyclist) suggested to me that if you look down while riding in your normal (non-tired) cycling position, your handlebars should hide the front hub on a road bike.

Now, whether or not this is an accurate way to measure basic bike fit... do you test this when you're on the tops, on the hoods, or in the drops? Because all of those positions have different results. From the limited search I did, some seem to say drops, others hoods.
This is just another general guide to fitting, not something to hang you hat on. The amount of fork offset, your relative arm length to torso length, your flexibility, etc. are all going to affect this, so there is no "right" answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. Thats 2 for the hoods. Which seems right since thats an in between from tops to drops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
wouldn't it also rely on how tired the rider is or how flexible they're feeling? It seems when I get tired I start to slouch and pull back more, but have been trying to stop that.
 

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wouldn't it also rely on how tired the rider is or how flexible they're feeling? It seems when I get tired I start to slouch and pull back more, but have been trying to stop that.
That's another story. Ideally you should size/fit for measure your bike based on your body proportions, actual flexbility and to have maximum comfort and efficiency while riding. A proper fit will eventually land you a position where you will feel "suspended" on the bike,your weight equally distributed between hands,butt and feet. There are only two ways to achieve this : invest in a proper bike fit or experiment for yourself. The latter will eventually teach you things the hard way but definitely cheaper. Still,without a proper bike feet it took me 3 years to score the perfect fit and a lot of painkillers were thrown in the process..:mad2:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
True. I've had a proper fit, more just asking about this old wives tale. Also, if one wants a certain style ride (like endurance vs. race), it seems they almost always will get a more "proper" fit on an endurance style geo as its more comfortable.

on both bikes that fit me (verified from my fitter) I am more comfortable and "suspended" feeling on my endurance bike.
 

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There are only two ways to achieve this : invest in a proper bike fit or experiment for yourself. The latter will eventually teach you things the hard way but definitely cheaper.
Even after the bike fit, one would still have to rely on the actual feel to fine tune and that's no quick job.

Still,without a proper bike feet it took me 3 years to score the perfect fit and a lot of painkillers were thrown in the process..:mad2:.
Do you mean the pain from getting passed / dropped by some fat dude or a kid on a beach cruiser despite the best effort to keep up? It can happen if the fit isn't good.
 

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Back in the day, it was while you were in the drops with your arms bent.
 

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Back in the day, it was while you were in the drops with your arms bent.
Yup, but the fit was different then too. Look at the bikes Eddy Merckx rode and his position on them. Very foreign to today's setups.

And I "checked" this on my bike and would say that the hub appears to be 1-2 inches behind the bars. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all of the responses. I read of another one today. Apparently to determine your best reach, you can place the tip of your elbow on the tip of your saddle, then place your hand of that same arm straight towards the stem/handlebars. If your fingers just barely reach the bar, it's a good reach. I tried it and my fingertips are about 5mm away from the bar. These seems even more inaccurate considering angles, geometry and body part proportions.
 

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Thanks for all of the responses. I read of another one today. Apparently to determine your best reach, you can place the tip of your elbow on the tip of your saddle, then place your hand of that same arm straight towards the stem/handlebars. If your fingers just barely reach the bar, it's a good reach. I tried it and my fingertips are about 5mm away from the bar. These seems even more inaccurate considering angles, geometry and body part proportions.
Indeed.

Like the old scrape the pedal at 6 o'clock with the heel of the foot bit to determine saddle height, this is at best a starting point for someone beginning without the benefit of a more proper fit.
 

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On the hoods, the plumb line from the knee should intersect the axle of the pedal, the heel scrape, 1000 kilometers on a fixed gear before your road bike miles, and many more from the old school....
 

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Apparently to determine your best reach, you can place the tip of your elbow on the tip of your saddle, then place your hand of that same arm straight towards the stem/handlebars. If your fingers just barely reach the bar, it's a good reach.
Too general. :( There are saddles with the wide portion further back than others such as Selle SMP. In such case, the hip placement would be further back. Then there is saddle with the opposite width profile, such as Specialized Power. In such case, the method mentioned above would make the hip location too far forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Too general. :( There are saddles with the wide portion further back than others such as Selle SMP. In such case, the hip placement would be further back. Then there is saddle with the opposite width profile, such as Specialized Power. In such case, the method mentioned above would make the hip location too far forward.
Correct. But even still, isn't this method not that accurate considering drop and diffferent proportioned body parts? Also, it seems there are different versions of the "rule". One that I read suggested fingertips just barely touching the bars. Another said center bar. And another said to add the width of your second hand!
 
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