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Rep *****.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Painting the house exterior (wood siding, good condition) got a few questions.

1) Latex, oil or water based?
2) Primer or no primer. I'm changing the color if that matters.
3) One brand better than another?
4) Anyone want to make a few extra bucks?
 

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Frog Whisperer
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opaque stain, buy the best, yes it matters unless you like this job...
 

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Bamboozled by love...
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Yes, but

Touch0Gray said:
opaque stain, buy the best, yes it matters unless you like this job...
I read the OP as the exterior is already painted. If so, DO NOT stain over the paint -- it won't adhere. Bare/new exterior, YES use opaque stain, by all means.

So, to the OP -- if what you've got is already painted and you don't want to strip EVERYTHING (can't imagine any sane person wanting to do that), you're stuck with paint.

For all new exterior stuff, I ALWAYS use oil-based primer (usually tinted close to final colors), then high-quality latex (Martin-Senour, Benjamin Moore, etc.) exterior top coats if I'm painting. If I'm staining new stuff, I'll use whatever kind of stain prep/sealer/primer is recommended by the stain manufacturer.

Stay far away from Sears/Home Depot/Lowe's house brands... not worth saving a few $$$ a gallon to use that stuff, IMO.
 

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half-fast
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I'd vote for paint. It is getting hard to get oil based paint around here, so that choice is made for you most of the time.

Talk to the paint salesman at the paint store. Not the HD or Lowes ar whatever.

Use something like Gripper or another heavy-duty primer/stain killer/bonding agent. Have it tinted 50%.

Do a good job with prep.

Really do a good job with prep.

Don't try to hide problems. fix them first.

I don't paint houses. Sorry.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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mleptuck said:
I read the OP as the exterior is already painted. If so, DO NOT stain over the paint -- it won't adhere. Bare/new exterior, YES use opaque stain, by all means.

So, to the OP -- if what you've got is already painted and you don't want to strip EVERYTHING (can't imagine any sane person wanting to do that), you're stuck with paint.

For all new exterior stuff, I ALWAYS use oil-based primer (usually tinted close to final colors), then high-quality latex (Martin-Senour, Benjamin Moore, etc.) exterior top coats if I'm painting. If I'm staining new stuff, I'll use whatever kind of stain prep/sealer/primer is recommended by the stain manufacturer.

Stay far away from Sears/Home Depot/Lowe's house brands... not worth saving a few $$$ a gallon to use that stuff, IMO.
absolutely, I read it as painting not re-painting....so THAT is KEY here..painted already...have to stick to paint or strip....shudder
 

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Adventure Seeker
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I can use my experience with indoor, but not outdoor. I used the Behr for my living room, and when it came to my son's room, I tried to go the cheap route. I ended up buying the better stuff, as the cheap stuff you'll want to put like 10 coats on for it do look decent.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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The last paint we bought (a couple of months ago) interior, latex enamel, flat was over 25 bucks a gallon.....exterior will be more. Fivers will be cheaper....
 

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Rep *****.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yup, re-paint. Snazzing up a rental.
Considering cedar shingles for the new house so the opaque stain might fly there.
 

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Bamboozled by love...
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firstrax said:
Yup, re-paint. Snazzing up a rental.
Considering cedar shingles for the new house so the opaque stain might fly there.
Well, to add more complication: *IF* you do new cedar shakes/shingles I would suggest DIPPING them! It sounds a bit comical but it works very well. Set up a mess of rope/clotheslines and get some clothespins, some tarps, some coarse whitewash brushes, latex gloves and a couple of 5gal buckets of prep/primer/finish coats. Get a couple of buddies and some beer, and form a little assembly line. One guy hands new shingle to #2. #2 dips shingle into liquid stuff, hands to #3. #3 grabs shingle with one hand, uses whitewash brush to remove excess coating into 'catch' pan, and hands shingle to #4. #4 clips wet shingle to clothesline with clothespin at the top thin end. Depending on the weather, within an hour, most will be ready to re-coat.

It's a WAY better finish -- any exterior woods should ALWAYS be at least primed on all sides, and on the houses I build we have the painter usually do primer and one finish coat this way. Last coat gets brushed on by hand after installation and caulking. It's actually cheaper in the long run, because he and his guys spend WAY less time up on ladders and roofs.
 

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Rep *****.
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
mleptuck said:
Well, to add more complication: *IF* you do new cedar shakes/shingles I would suggest DIPPING them! It sounds a bit comical but it works very well. Set up a mess of rope/clotheslines and get some clothespins, some tarps, some coarse whitewash brushes, latex gloves and a couple of 5gal buckets of prep/primer/finish coats. Get a couple of buddies and some beer, and form a little assembly line. One guy hands new shingle to #2. #2 dips shingle into liquid stuff, hands to #3. #3 grabs shingle with one hand, uses whitewash brush to remove excess coating into 'catch' pan, and hands shingle to #4. #4 clips wet shingle to clothesline with clothespin at the top thin end. Depending on the weather, within an hour, most will be ready to re-coat.

It's a WAY better finish -- any exterior woods should ALWAYS be at least primed on all sides, and on the houses I build we have the painter usually do primer and one finish coat this way. Last coat gets brushed on by hand after installation and caulking. It's actually cheaper in the long run, because he and his guys spend WAY less time up on ladders and roofs.
That reminds me, theres a guy in town with an automated "spray-flip-spray" system that the local builders bring their trim and siding to.
 

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n00bsauce
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What's the house painted with now. Latex? Oil? What kind of shape is the paint on the house now? Just faded? Chalked? Peeling? How many layers on the house now? How long has the paint been on the house? How dirty, mildewed, molded is the siding? Wood, aluminum, vinyl, cement board, slate siding? There is no easy answer or one size fits all answer. Primer might be in order for the whole house. Spot priming may be just fine, depending. If the paint is basically in good shape you may not need a primer at all. Latex over oil based - fine. Oil over latex - no no. Don't use an oil based primer over old latex paint.

Personally, I give Consumer Reports a lot of creds for their paint testing and recommendations. Check out what they recommend for a brand and model of paint. Consider low or no VOC paint.
 

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needs more sleep
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Latex over a good primer.. Killz primer is really good. The key is good prep (sanding, filling and priming) covered with a quality latex paint (Dunn Edwards). Good luck finding oil based anymore.
 

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mleptuck said:
I For all new exterior stuff, I ALWAYS use oil-based primer (usually tinted close to final colors), then high-quality latex (Martin-Senour, Benjamin Moore, etc.) exterior top coats if I'm painting. If I'm staining new stuff, I'll use whatever kind of stain prep/sealer/primer is recommended by the stain manufacturer.
Stay far away from Sears/Home Depot/Lowe's house brands... not worth saving a few $$$ a gallon to use that stuff, IMO.
+1 except for the Home Depot part. If I'm not mistaken, Behr paint (HD's house brand) has dominated Consumer Reports' tests the last several years. I painted the trim on the weather side of my house with it four years ago, and it still looks pretty good. That side gets a lot of windblown sand, and the previous finishes have been pretty well shot in three years or so.
Having the primer tinted to something approximating the final color is well worth the trouble. I've had good success with Kilz, too.
 

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It may depend on your state buying oil based

bigchromewheelssuck said:
Latex over a good primer.. Killz primer is really good. The key is good prep (sanding, filling and priming) covered with a quality latex paint (Dunn Edwards). Good luck finding oil based anymore.
Can not by in PA as far as I know, sometimes can find it in OH.

If you are thinking about reside with cedar, think about cement, pre stained. www.certainteed.com
 

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Beetpull DeLite
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Cory's right, Behr's done well in CR lately.

A couple of years back the roomie and I used Valspar to paint her house inside, and every wall required at least two coats. The red color in the bedroom took one coat of tinted primer and three coats of paint. I was not happy. I wish we'd listened to her parents and driven the extra distance to Home Depot for some Behr.
 

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hmm, interesting, valspar premium moves up in the long term ratings on CR.

We were very satisfied with the behr premium ext semi-gloss latex after 3 yrs in Louisiana sun. Wood siding in good shape. We used it due to high CR ratings & it's mildew resistance.

They note this: in the Quick Picks

Best flat paint:

California 2010 (flat) $38
Kelly-Moore Acry-Shield (flat) $32

California 2010 is a top-performing line in our tests and is available in 25 states. Kelly-Moore, another regional brand sold in 9 states, performed well and costs roughly the same. Among last year's top picks: California Fresh Coat Velvet, which we're retesting, and Glidden Spred Dura, which was reformulated.

Best if you want a glossier paint:
Valspar Ultra Premium Satin (low luster) $24
Valspar Ultra Premium Semi-gloss $25

Both of these paints performed well, cost about the same, and are sold nationwide at Lowe's. Last year's top-scoring Glidden Spred Dura Gloss and Satin have both been reformulated.
 
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