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A wheelist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope that this can be of use to someone. I just made it today. It's the Roger Musson (of wheelbuilding e-book fame) home-made cardboard dish gauge. I modified the feeler thingie so that the QR didn't need removing each time. The bent spoke fits around the QR.

This thing works like a champ and takes ten minutes to make. Just touch the spoke to the hub "locknut", clamp it with your thumb, turn the wheel around (don't let the spoke move!) and check the other side. Adjust dish as needed. Bob's yer uncle.

If you can't figure out the needed dimensions, buy and download Roger's e-book 'coz it's his idea.
 

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Very ingenious. Amazing ideas that people come up with.
Personally, I always put an already built, accurately dished wheel in my stand, set my adjusters to that, and true my newly built wheel to those settings.
And, just to be sure, I flip my new wheel around in the stand to check dish. Works like a charm.
 

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A wheelist
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very ingenious. Amazing ideas that people come up with.
Personally, I always put an already built, accurately dished wheel in my stand, set my adjusters to that, and true my newly built wheel to those settings.
And, just to be sure, I flip my new wheel around in the stand to check dish. Works like a charm.
For the last while (since I got a Roger Musson wooden wheel stand) I've used inside calipers to gauge between rim and stand uprights but I'm enjoying this cardboard contraption right now. I'll decide which is best.
 

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Nice and simple looking.

If a truing stand is available I find it simpler and more accurate to flip the wheel and check it to one caliper though.
You still don't really know for sure if wheel is centered, though. The only sure fire way is by using this tool. It reduces all the variables that screw up the measurement, like whether you got the wheel in the truing stand straight, the pointers are still centered from the last time you used the stand.
 

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You still don't really know for sure if wheel is centered, though. The only sure fire way is by using this tool...
Using a dishing gauge properly is a surefire way to ensure the wheel is centered. Using a truing stand properly and flipping the wheel ensures the same thing. In both cases, using the tool properly is key to accurate results.

I do find using a dishing tool more convenient than flipping wheel and use it on the wheel while the wheel remains in the truing stand.
 

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Using a dishing gauge properly is a surefire way to ensure the wheel is centered. Using a truing stand properly and flipping the wheel ensures the same thing. In both cases, using the tool properly is key to accurate results.

I do find using a dishing tool more convenient than flipping wheel and use it on the wheel while the wheel remains in the truing stand.
If you don't have a dishing tool, yeah, flipping the wheel in the stand works, but you have to be careful. I find the dishing tool easy, straightforward, and quicker. Then I don't have to worry about whether the truing stand is aligned perfectly. I'm always tightening the pointers up as as the wheel gets truer, anyway. The one I have is slightly wobbly and hard to keep in alignment.

I made a dishing tool out of a piece of 1 inch wood, the same shape as Mike T's, with a metal pointer attached by a thumbscrew. I like working with wooden tools. They don't mar the finish and feel nice in your hands. Wood is perfect for a dishing tool.
 

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A wheelist
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I made a dishing tool out of a piece of 1 inch wood, the same shape as Mike T's, with a metal pointer attached by a thumbscrew. I like working with wooden tools. They don't mar the finish and feel nice in your hands. Wood is perfect for a dishing tool.
Ooooh ahhh, you're given me an idea - I have some cherry left over from when I trimmed my bathroom. I think I have a 1x6 board which should be perfect. I used some for trimmimg my wheelbuilding table (pics on my site) and was considering pimping up my Roger Musson wooden wheel stand with it. Hmmmm..............thanks for the tip.

My bent spoke with a thumbscrew would work fine on the cherry gauge.

BTW, here's Ric Hjertberg with his wooden dish tool -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=du7TzBZ9lnQ

Good grief, someone had too much free time on their hands -

Gear: The Wheel Dishing Tool | Cycle EXIF
 

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A wheelist
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11,324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I made a dishing tool out of a piece of 1 inch wood, the same shape as Mike T's, with a metal pointer attached by a thumbscrew. I like working with wooden tools. They don't mar the finish and feel nice in your hands. Wood is perfect for a dishing tool.
You got a photo for us Fred?
 
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