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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just tried for the first time using honey instead of gels. Maybe it was something else but I sure seemed to get a real kick from the honey. I used a mix of honey, blackstrap molasses, and sea salt. Just curious if this has been discussed previously and if there was a consensus. I'm planning on continuing with honey for now.
 

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I used to have over a hundred hives, so I could never see paying a buck for a gel which was essentially what I was feeding my bees each spring at ten cents a pound. Honey worked fine for me, but I always found it a bit harsh if my throat was at all dry. I'd mix three tbp's into a bottle and found it worked well. Adding molasses and sea salt? Yuck!
 

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waterproof*
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I've been using honey cut with water in a gel flask for several years now.

+1 it can hit my throat pretty harsh if I take a big gulp while working hard, so I just chase it with a swig from the water bottle.

One thing I have noticed, I can take just the tiniest little taste, not even a sip, and it perks me up and I feel better. Placebo? Who cares.
 

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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Molasses and Sea Salt

The addition of a little black strap molasses and sea salt gives me my electrolytes. That way I only carry water. It's a lot easier to find water out on the road and I can use it to squirt on my back and head on hot days. The taste wasn't that bad really.
 

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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Honey Stinger Chews

I was looking at those. I'll probably try them now because I did get a knarly throat for a day after my first try with honey/molasses/seasalt.

Kind of weird how honey can make your throat knarly when so many people use it to soothe sore throats,
 

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It's dry, usually about 13% moisture content. It helps with wounds (and sore throats) because it's bacterial static; so dry that bacteria can't live in it. You might want to thin it a bit with water; I'm sure that's all the Honey Stinger folks do.
 

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RoadBikeRider
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BeeCharmer said:
I could never see paying a buck for a gel which was essentially what I was feeding my bees each spring at ten cents a pound.
I am confused now...I thought bees made honey, I didn't know you fed it to them???
 

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BeeCharmer said:
It's dry, usually about 13% moisture content. It helps with wounds (and sore throats) because it's bacterial static; so dry that bacteria can't live in it.
Then how does the bacteria that gives infants botulism live in honey?
 

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Rodie Persona
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I have been using straight honey for a little over a year now. I totally feel it hit my system as well. I prefer to buy from a local producer (hives are about 10 miles away [and I live in the LA Metro Area]) who sells at a few local farmers markets. I tried the strapped molasses and salt thing. I really didn't like the taste and fuss. Stuck with pure honey. I don't have any problems with dry mouth.

I put a bit of honey, bee pollen, and chia seeds on my oat meal in the mornings as well.
 

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I am a rookie rider, but have kept bees for awhile. I love honey anyway, and realize the quick energy boost it can give. Glad to hear others are experimenting with it and having success. Ain't nuttin' better:D
 

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botulism

e34john said:
Then how does the bacteria that gives infants botulism live in honey?
It's dry enough to keep bacteria from growing (bacterial static), spores survive no matter what. Interestingly, the whole botulism in honey thing is a crock; that nuck that just fell on the kitchen floor probably has more spores on it than an entire jar of honey.
 

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Today on my long run I used honey in my gel flask. Mixed in a drop of vanilla extract and a little of the leftover coffee from this morning. The coffee thinned it out just a little, and it wasn't so harsh. Delicious.
 

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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Honey Powder

MTBMaven said:
I have been using straight honey for a little over a year now. I totally feel it hit my system as well. I prefer to buy from a local producer (hives are about 10 miles away [and I live in the LA Metro Area]) who sells at a few local farmers markets. I tried the strapped molasses and salt thing. I really didn't like the taste and fuss. Stuck with pure honey. I don't have any problems with dry mouth.

I put a bit of honey, bee pollen, and chia seeds on my oat meal in the mornings as well.
I've seen honey powder lately in a couple of the local asian stores. Do you know if that disolves like sugar?
 

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BeeCharmer said:
It's dry enough to keep bacteria from growing (bacterial static), spores survive no matter what. Interestingly, the whole botulism in honey thing is a crock; that nuck that just fell on the kitchen floor probably has more spores on it than an entire jar of honey.
Makes sense. I didn't really believe the whole not giving it infant thing either, I mean if they are healthy, they should be fine even with their supposed weaker immune systems. Maybe I should carry a tube of honey with me, eat it and slather it on road rash if I'm ever down.
 

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leon2982
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
slather it before going down

e34john said:
Makes sense. I didn't really believe the whole not giving it infant thing either, I mean if they are healthy, they should be fine even with their supposed weaker immune systems. Maybe I should carry a tube of honey with me, eat it and slather it on road rash if I'm ever down.

Then you'll just slide down the road.
 

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Rodie Persona
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e34john said:
Makes sense. I didn't really believe the whole not giving it infant thing either, I mean if they are healthy, they should be fine even with their supposed weaker immune systems. Maybe I should carry a tube of honey with me, eat it and slather it on road rash if I'm ever down.
I suspect honey power is different than bee pollen. Bee pollen is pollen that is collected on the bees legs and is collected into little pellets. I was told by our bee guy to that the bees treat the honey as their carbohydrates and the pollen as their protein. I don't know if he meant this figuratively or literally. Maybe one of the other responders can comment. Bee pollen is a good source of energy and essential nutrients, and is linked to longevity.
 

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HFCS in the spring

andulong said:
I am confused now...I thought bees made honey, I didn't know you fed it to them???
Sure, they need corn syrup or sugar syrup in the spring to boost the population for splitting with new queens. Feeding them with honey supers on (the boxes over the main hive) is illegal and basically amounts to diluting honey with HFCS, something pretty common in the honey coming in from China.
 

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I've had honey probably since the day I was born! Never had a problem.
My grandfather also had bees and we've had tons of honey in the house as I was growing up. Today I still use honey that I purchase from a local farm (local Honey) and it helps with my alergies, cycling and as a sweetner to mention a few!

I'm actually thinking of starting my own bee hive this spring since I own about an acre of land... should be enough space.

I've included a photo of grandpa in 1935!

Honey is very healthy and sure helps me in cycling.

Peter
 
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