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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I never feel like I get my money's worth for my health insurance. My employer is very generous with their contribution, but I am still shilling out a good deal of money each paycheck for a service I only use once or twice a year.

You always hear, "consult your physician before starting an workout program" , but how many people actually do?

That got me thinking; I have decided this year to get serious about racing and I want to know should I talk to my doctor about my plan?

What kind of medical assistance can my family doctor give me on the insurance companies dime?

I could really use some help with my diet.

I also have some chronic bike related pains.

I have a pain that develops in my upper back after long miles. People tell me its my neck muscles getting tired of holding up my head, and that makes sense but I'd rather hear it from an MD.

Also I have shoe fit issues that result in pain developing with the miles. My cycling shoe selection goes by which shoe will take the longest to murder my feet. Any ride over 4hrs will leave me unable to put weight on my feet for an hour after I get off the bike. I have been dreaming of a pair of D2s, but really can't afford them. Is this somewhere that my Doc could offer help?

What about all those LT and VO2 tests I hear about? I don't really need it, but if the insurance is ponying up than I am for it.

Anything else I am missing?

Also, if it helps, my family doctor has a background in sports medicine.
 

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but thinking about it
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funktekk said:
That got me thinking; I have decided this year to get serious about racing and I want to know should I talk to my doctor about my plan?

[snip]

Anything else I am missing?

Also, if it helps, my family doctor has a background in sports medicine.
I doubt you'll get anywhere on LT and VO2 testing, but a referral to a covered chiropractor or physical therapist for your neck pains seems reasonable. A referral to a podiatrist for custom insoles is possible, too, although I wouldn't be surprised if you have trouble if they're bike-specific insoles. Diet questions may get you a referral to a nutritionist, although in seeking the referral I'd think you have better odds of having it covered by insurance if you have "normal" (rather than sports-specific) concerns about your diet. For example, if you feel sluggish and tired more than you think is normal, you can mention it and say you'd like to speak to a nutritionist. Once you're there, you should of course let the nutritionist know about your training load. The other thing that occurs to me is blood testing, which should be a part of some normal physical. If you're doctor is knowledgeable about sports medicine, you can ask him or her (or the nutritionist) to consider your training load in reviewing the results.

But aside from the PT and insoles, unless there's something actually wrong in your blood workup or you don't already know the basics of a good training diet, I wouldn't expect much benefit out of the input.
 

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For your back problems I would try to find a local DO in your area. If you can find a DO that specializes in OMT that would be your best bet. Otherwise I would find a family practice DO who uses OMT in his/her practice.

I would also checkout super feet blue or yellow insoles for your shoes. http://www.superfeet.com/. They are the best insoles I have used in any type of shoe.
 

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Call me a Fred
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Get a prescription for some steroids and some EPO.
 
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Go watch the documentary bigger, stronger faster - basically you go to chiropractor and he can then check you and prescribe for you a steroid plan and it will be paid for by your health care provider. If you know any nurses they can get EPO - go to any hospital that treats cancer patients and that stuff is all over the place like m&ms at a penny candy store.

Read this story where the guy did EPO and wrote about it. Big boost to performance, certainly more so than, say, deep dish carbon rims. Bot not to worry, no in cycling is doing that stuff.

http://outside.away.com/outside/bodywork/200311/200311_drug_test_1.html
 

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dude, get real. your high rates pay to subsidize others. don't go looking for your money's worth if you are a republican. if you are a Dem, you should be happy that you can afford insurance and that you are able to help others receive medical care.
 

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+1 on hope you don't need it

Its INSURANCE, just in case. Like pretender said, its better if you don't need it. Of course, if you fall riding and break your hip like I did, then you get your money's worth... but your training and fitness get shot to H - E - double hockey sticks.
 

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sdjeff said:
Its INSURANCE, just in case. Like pretender said, its better if you don't need it. Of course, if you fall riding and break your hip like I did, then you get your money's worth... but your training and fitness get shot to H - E - double hockey sticks.
Precisely.

The whiney phrase "I am still shilling out a good deal of money each paycheck for a service I only use once or twice a year" makes me want to punch him in the throat and let him get his money's worth.

Brings to mind this gem:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoGYx35ypus
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
pretender said:
Precisely.

The whiney phrase "I am still shilling out a good deal of money each paycheck for a service I only use once or twice a year" makes me want to punch him in the throat and let him get his money's worth.
So what is so wrong about searching out all the potential benefits of a service that I am paying for?

I, as well as many people, only use their health insurance when I get sick. There are many things an MD can do to keep you healthy in the first place. This is beneficial to all parties involved. For example consultation on a diet plan is a lot cheaper than open heart surgery.

I don't see your point. Why is it so long wrong to look to get the most valve out of my money?

The attitude of, "you should be so lucky as to not be using your insurance" is wrong.
 

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funktekk said:
I, as well as many people, only use their health insurance when I get sick.
That is precisely what health insurance is for. Unless your plan specifically covers "wellness" benefits you are unlikely to get much out of it unless you are sick or injured. Ask your employer if you can opt out, then pray you never need to go to the ER.
 

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i pay for car insurance, and I would like my car to go faster too. I do not have car "performance" insurance. preventative maintenance, yes, accident/repair, yes. but Geico will not buy me a smoother ride or more horsepower. I can buy those things, but they come out of my own pocket.
Now the real joke is that I am a business owner with no employees. as such I CANNOT get dental or eye coverage, and you know those "$10 prescriptions", I can't buy that coverage at any price. Now if I hire just 1 W2 employee(all mine at 1099) I can get kickass insurance. please explain this one to me
 

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Good luck with this. My guess is that if you go to your doc and ask for all this stuff the best you'll do is get an Rx for PT for the neck thing, the worst you'll get is a polite "go away". Insurance is for treatment, not prevention (go to PO to discuss this point). Insurance is essentially legalized gambling - what are the odds of you sustaining an injury or illness requiring a hospital stay versus your ability to afford a hospital stay or surgery on your own.

I dumped tons of money into insurance, never went to the doc, and shared your feelings on the subject. Then I tore up a knee skiing and needed surgery (not even an acl injury). Then I tore up a shoulder and needed surgery. Those two alone made up for years of no doc visits. Then my wife got diagnosed with MS - the meds without insurance are over $1500/month.

Go ahead and opt out of your employers health plan. Then every time you line up for a race, do some quick math regarding whether or not you can afford a broken collarbone or worse (broken hip a la Floyd Landis?) when some Cat 4 clown takes out your front wheel in a corner.
 

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Come on, The US is very bad at doing preventive medicine - not good for business. A visit to the doc once or twice a year will save money in the long run. Healthy adult males rarely go, I think I've been five times in the past 20 years - contradictory I know. Most docs are delighted to see healthy men make a visit and will take the opportunity to run a full examination and any useful tests. Lots of conditions, testicular cancer for instance, have been caught early through this.
 

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Still waiting......
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I agree the US isn't good at preventative medicine.

Similar to carlos' experience, the few times I've gone in a physical (not as often as I should) the doc has been thorough and completely professional.

However, what the OP was asking about has nothing to do with preventative medicine. I would venture a guess that as an aggregate annual physicals have resulted in a lot more early interventions on potentially deadly diseases than an LT/VO2max test. If there was a significant medical use for LT/VO2 other than athletic performance they'd be covered under a lot of policies.
 

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I've had insurance for a year and a half since I got my job.. I've used it once for a doctors visit and once for reading glasses. I have an appointment for a full physical this week.. I figure if I'm going to totally destroy myself this summer cycling it's a good idea to get checked up.. Might as well right? So i'm with the OP.. use it when you need it.
 
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