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that you are not totally trained, and take them as training stimuly?

My season and priority "A" races, begin in february, but in two weeks (29th jan) I have a race with a big hill. Right now I`m doing mid intervals (4~5 mins longs, for the ones following the morris plan, I`m in the SMSPO part, ending my first week).
So I know this race must be taken as a training day, but how do you "train" on a race. I mean, do you attack all the time, just do your intervals a little bit longer till you can`t stand them, or try to do the ENTIRE race as hard as you can?
This is a short race (20km) the most and only difficult part is a long climb of 25mins, before this climb is all flat surface.

Thanks a lot for your suggestions
bye!
 

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My only thought is that you should resist the urge to sit in, save energy, and do smart racing stuff like that. If the race is only 20k, how easy could it be? It's not like there's a long, drawn out tempo session at the beginning.

So, race aggressively, but also don't worry about what zone you're in. If you're going hard in a race, you'll be hitting zone the SMSP zones.

Silas
 

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The answer to this question really depends on your ability as a rider and what you are trying to accomplish. Advanced riders doing early season races for training usually seek to maximize volume. That means they will often ride to the race, ride aggressively at or off the front during the race if it is too easy, and then ride home if they need even more time on the bike. This can often total 5-8 hours. Advanced riders who don't have that much time or are working on intensity will just ride the race but at full throttle -- that means no sitting in, attacking lots, and riding "stupidly aggressive".

This is not recommended for beginning riders. Beginning riders should learn to get comfortable in the draft, to conserve energy, and to become used to the explosive accelerations which they may not have experienced during training. This would entail sitting in to the base of the climb and then doing your best to ride up the climb with riders of your ability. Work on skills and tactics, on race preparation, on all the little things good riders do to succeed in their important races.

Intermediate level riders should probably do something in between, such as working on their weaknesses. Many riders have never been in a real break -- experiment on where, when and how to attack. Some riders have never placed in a sprint -- perhaps these riders should focus on pack positioning in the closing laps of a race -- or perhaps they should practice attacking in the finale before a sprint finish.

Early season training races are for training so NO TEAM TACTICS. You will only earn disrespect if you race negatively in a training race. Even if a team mate is up the road, it's okay to work with a bridging group (as long as you're not dragging the field up) Practice aggressive tactics, not negative ones, and everyone will be happier and it will pay off in the long run. It's also okay to lead a team mate out or to refuse to chase down a mate as you get close to the finish, but we're talking about the final few laps of the race.
 
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