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I would like to think that a lot of people have a bike that started it all, got them through so much, and was always there for them. For me, it is my specialized mountain bike Gloria; we have gone through so much in the past 4-5 years, and as she ages- so does my inexperience.

I remember scoring her as a steal from a friend, not knowing what was to come. I remember handing her over to my local bike shop mechanic- who said I shouldn't bother- that I should move on after the last years insanely difficult and bad luck ridden rides. And I remember this past winter when I had given up all hope for survival at the top of the mountain and she saw me through it. (a story i will be telling in the future)

So I can't be the only one can I, or am I jsut crazy. I am saving for a new a bike with new memories, but Gloria and I are a righteous team. A massive overhaul is what she looks forward to, the least i can do to extend her lifespan.

Not everyone can be siked for that new bike, no matter how better it performs.
 

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n00bsauce
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Well, considering I've only sold one bike I've ever bought since 1972 (currently have seven complete bikes, two frames and one sold to my brother-in-law) I can totally understand. I'm always psyched up for a new ride but I can't seem to give up the old. Some have taken on new uses (fixed gear, commuter, travel bike) while a couple have had parts scavanged and are a shell of their former existence.
 

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eminence grease
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I've only sold two bikes in the last 15 years, my first Rockhopper Comp and my Proflex 856. In both cases I didn't have much of an emotional attachment to them and I had co-workers who really needed a bike.

In the same timespan I've added about 20. Truth is, I'd rather strip down the frames and hang them on the rafters than sell them off. I doubt I'll ever use them again, but I bought them for a reason in the first place, and in most cases that reason still exists. Even if I don't plan on riding them. The rationale is easy - you get such a pittance in return that it's hardly worth the bother. And then there's the attachment.

Why not treat Gloria the way we treat our old school horses - give them a home until it's time for them to go to the great pasture in the sky. Since the bike isn't actually going to die, why not move some parts along to a new one and hang up that frame in a place of honor, somewhere where she can always remind you of your great times together. Unless you really want to keep her in the field, in which case - keep on riding her.

But in any event, don't feel like you're doing something dumb. Bikes may be merely tools to some people, to others they're part of the family. A part that we always look forward to spending time with.
 

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LOOK lover
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My 1st serious bike ('93 Trek 2300) was stolen after 18 mos. I replaced it with a '95 Kestrel 200sci and rode it until '03 when a landscaper with an attitude ran me down. He's paid for three new bikes since then :), but the Kestrel frame still hangs in the garage with its cracked head tube. I just can't get myself to toss it.
 

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I'm wrestling the exact same issue -- just this weekend I bought a Jake to replace my old mountain bike. Problem is that I've had that mountain bike for 15 years, upgraded every piece on it, gone through many phases of riding, and feel guilty even casting her aside for something new.

Right now I'm rationalizing that she's so old and beat up that I wouldn't get any money for it anyway :)
 

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Steaming piles of opinion
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My first roadie and forever love - an 89 or 90 Cannondale 3.0 aka "Black Beauty" lives on as a fixed-gear conversion. Still gets quite a few miles in the springtime, and still has some things to teach me.
 

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BikePUNX said:
I would like to think that a lot of people have a bike that started it all, got them through so much, and was always there for them. For me, it is my specialized mountain bike Gloria; we have gone through so much in the past 4-5 years, and as she ages- so does my inexperience.

I remember scoring her as a steal from a friend, not knowing what was to come. I remember handing her over to my local bike shop mechanic- who said I shouldn't bother- that I should move on after the last years insanely difficult and bad luck ridden rides. And I remember this past winter when I had given up all hope for survival at the top of the mountain and she saw me through it. (a story i will be telling in the future)

So I can't be the only one can I, or am I jsut crazy. I am saving for a new a bike with new memories, but Gloria and I are a righteous team. A massive overhaul is what she looks forward to, the least i can do to extend her lifespan.

Not everyone can be siked for that new bike, no matter how better it performs.
First of all you can stop referring to it as a "she" and calling her Gloria. It's a bike man, pull yourself together fer pete's sake. Are you unhinged? Discard this bike, don't put another dime into it and get a better bike. One week later not even a twinge of regret, guaranteed.
 

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I still have my '86 Vitus 979. It was my second serious bike, and the first I built up myself (when the frame on my first bike broke). It's had three different grouppos on it. When I stopped riding, I couldn't bear to part with it, so I stashed it in the attic. I rode it a bit when I started riding again, but all the components were worn out, so I bought a new bike. When I replaced that bike's components (went to a triple for the big climbs) I had enough good components to put on the Vitus. I use it now as a rain/trainer bike.
 

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When I started riding in '89 or '90, after a long hiatus, I bought a Univega hybrid. A bit heavy, not a stellar parts spec but O.K. to noodle around on. Bought a MTB not long after, then a touring bike. Things kinda snowballed and at some point I peaked at 56 bikes (+/- 1). MTBs. Road bikes. 'Cross bikes (lotsa 'cross bikes....) Titanium. CF. Boralyn. Steel. Aluminium.

I've lately been selling lots of bikes, and have a lot more culling to do, but when I was deciding what had to go and what would stay, I don't think I ever considered giving that 'vega the axe. I probably only take it out 2 or 3 times a year, but it's still perfect for casual bike path cruises with friends who aren't hardcore riders. It still serves a purpose, and I enjoy it, so it stays. Like TerryB said, I bought all of my bikes for a reason, so without a reason to sell 'em (like needing money), I wouldn't.
 

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Crashed the [email protected] out of it. Still got the fork on the wall

Motobecane Gran Jubillee, with Campy 990. Bought it for $150 at a fire sale, literally out of a pile of debris in front of a shop that had burned--they just pulled everything out and piled it, and I saw this blue frame with a Campy rear derailleur sticking out of the heap. It was my first "real" bike, did my first 25- and 50- and 100-mile rides on it. I rode it for five or six years, then crashed it in some sand on a MUT and folded it up pretty comprehensively. The fork, bent back about eight inches, is hanging on my shop wall.
 

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off the back
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right now my '89 Specialized Sirrus is my early season/crappy weather bike, and i'm working on putting fenders on it. and in a few years, when i save up some cash, i'd like to buy a Waterford for that duty(triple, fenders, the works)but i just can't see myself ever parting with the Sirrus. it was my first real road bike since the Raleigh Record i had as a kid, it got me started on this whole thing, and we've been through a lot together. i can't imagine looking across the room and not seeing it hanging there.

the same with my first mountain bike, a rigid, steel Specialized Stump Comp. i figure i'll use it as a putzing around town type bike. replaced that with an M2 Stump Comp, but i never really got comfortable with that bike. i think the saddle was just too much a chiseler for me, and i never did really enjoy riding it that much. and it seems the steel bike rode better, even with the rigid fork. that one i plan on selling, but even then, i have regrets, just cause it just looks so cool(black with white and yellow decals)
 

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RoadBikeReview's Member
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terry b said:
I've only sold two bikes in the last 15 years, my first Rockhopper Comp and my Proflex 856. In both cases I didn't have much of an emotional attachment to them and I had co-workers who really needed a bike.

In the same timespan I've added about 20. Truth is, I'd rather strip down the frames and hang them on the rafters than sell them off. I doubt I'll ever use them again, but I bought them for a reason in the first place, and in most cases that reason still exists. Even if I don't plan on riding them. The rationale is easy - you get such a pittance in return that it's hardly worth the bother. And then there's the attachment.

Why not treat Gloria the way we treat our old school horses - give them a home until it's time for them to go to the great pasture in the sky. Since the bike isn't actually going to die, why not move some parts along to a new one and hang up that frame in a place of honor, somewhere where she can always remind you of your great times together. Unless you really want to keep her in the field, in which case - keep on riding her.

But in any event, don't feel like you're doing something dumb. Bikes may be merely tools to some people, to others they're part of the family. A part that we always look forward to spending time with.
I friggin love you, man.
I've been trying for the last 2 years to explain to my rents why I will NOT sell my old crappy MTB. They're like "you can get $60 which isn't much but it's not an expensive bike" and i've refused, saying it's the bike that i first started logging real miles on.
They never got it.
I saw this post, printed it out, gave it to my parents.
They aren't going to try to sell it anymore
:)
-estone2
 

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Bought an '84 Centurion tourer which I rode for a dozen years as my only road bike. Too many memories to ever get rid of it. Have made only minimal expenditures and still ride it for the casual outing. There's something to be said for the "feel of softer steel" when speed/efficiency is not an objective.
 

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Don't even think about getting rid of it. I personally beat dead horses until they are too poor off to even make it to the glue factory.

My first dream bike was my 01 Cannondale cross bike, bought it new at 14 years old with hard earned grass mowing money. I have had several road bikes go through my posession since then but this one will never leave me. It's on it's 4th drivetrain and has 16,000 miles, I don't even bother owning a road bike proper anymore because I keep coming back to my cross bike.

Same goes for my first real mountain bike, a 2000 Fuji Nevada bought it for $350 (again with that more grass mowing money). I continued to upgrade every part on that bike until it had a full XT kit, a bling fork and nice wheelset. Then I rode it into the ground over 3 race seasons and tons of mtb trips. My mechanic told me not to even try to salvage it, but instead I just reincarnated her as a singlespeed. She rarely sees action anymore due to new race bikes but always has a place in my room.
 

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I think I have the same bike - Centurion Protour 15 - A friend gave it to me 4 yr. ago, he had purchased from a guy in a bike shop for $15 after the bike shop declined to give anything for it on a trade in.

I finally bought a new road bike this year and love it - it's a joy to ride, faster, lighter, etc. ----BUT the old Centurion is still a great ride. The only problems I've had were with the drive train and normal wear. I'm going to fix 'er up as much as I can without investing much and ride it once in a while, but I'd like to find someone who's on the fence about riding and give it to them to get them started. It was a great way for me to figure out whether I would enjoy it with little risk - a pair of shoes, shorts and a jersey.

Great Bike.
 

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When i graduated college a few years ago my parents got me a new MTB for the occasion. My old steed was done for. She was on her last legs. I had bough her in 8th grade in preperation for a 200 mile trip I was doing. First bike/camping trip on it, first bike i starting mountainbiking on and really my kick off into biking passion. Well that started much younger but this one was big enough to last a bit. Rode it up a ski area back home and proceded to crack my first helmet on the way down. Wish i could say its the only helmet i've broken.

by the time i got my new bike this one was too small for me and didn't do much anymore but get me around town. I loved that bike, worked hard delivering newspapers on it and to pay for it.

So I did what anyone who loves a bike that isn't right for them anymore. Find someone who will love it. I donated it to a women's shelter that tends to have a lot of kids there. Even took it by my LBS that i got the new bike from, told them my plan and they tossed in some cheep grips (mine were torn up) and gave it a quick tune up. Insert shameless plug for the guys at Full Cycle in boulder.

Haven't seen the bike since dropping it off at the shelter but I like to think some kid thats had a tougher life then I is feeling the wind in his/her hair. Or perhaps some troubled young lady now has a way to get between home and work as she rebuilds her life.

there are a lot of places in need of old loved bikes. Please consider donating it. Spread the love of 2 wheels
 

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I didn't want to get rid of my first bike, but the fit was never really good for me and he was just gathering dust in the dining room corner. I looked on Craigslist and found an ad for someone looking for a bike to get back into cycling and sold it to him for $100. He didn't have much to spend and probably would have ended up on a Walmart bike otherwise. I threw in an old helmet, bottle cages, and a couple water bottles, too. I hope he gets a lot of use out of Big Black...he was a good bike.
 

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I hope to never give up my 1998 Schwinn Mesa GSX, the first "serious" bike I bought after being inspired by a mountain bike ride at summer camp. It's survived through 5 years of novice abuse on rough Northeast trails, life as a makeshift roadie before I picked up my Schwinn Fastback in '02 (I used to love the looks I got from spandex-clad roadies while passing them on a full-knobbied mtn bike), and a direct hit from a New Brunswick taxi while serving in its current role as my urban commuter.

If the 5.5 lbs of aluminum at its heart can make it through all that, I see no reason why I should ever have to let it go. So long as I'm able to ride, I will find a place for it in my stable. Best $500 I ever spent.
 
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