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Had a situation when riding Monday night and not sure if I handled it correctly.

I was riding down the trail with very little to no traffic. I was cruising along around 19 mph. Caught up with a guy and passed right away after calling out on your left.

I stayed my same speed, when less then a mile later the guy come right up on my tire to draft. Then slowly passes me without saying anything. So I yelled "on your right." Which must of pissed him off, so he decided to pick up the pace more and get out of his saddle.

Well to be a dick, I decided to return the favor and do what he did to me and passed but did say, "on your left again." This time he returned to his normal speed and stayed about 20 feet back when we hit the stop light about a mile down the trail waiting on the red light.

Am I the only one who handles this situation that way? I don't want some I don't know drafting me. I appreciate a call out when being passed. I think I'm getting to the grumpy old man phase. I'm also extra grumpy with people oncoming with no lights at night.
 

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sounds like you enjoy playing head games with other riders. but you already admitted being a dick, so no point debating that issue.

announcing when passing isn't a requirement and people vary about if / when to do so. just because you do it, doesn't make it the 'right' thing to do.

if you truly want someone off your six, just pull over and let them ride on...
 

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sounds like you enjoy playing head games with other riders. but you already admitted being a dick, so no point debating that issue.

announcing when passing isn't a requirement and people vary about if / when to do so. just because you do it, doesn't make it the 'right' thing to do.

if you truly want someone off your six, just pull over and let them ride on...
Or slow down a bit and wave them around. That's what I do. Works like a charm.
 

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Had a situation when riding Monday night and not sure if I handled it correctly.

I was riding down the trail with very little to no traffic. I was cruising along around 19 mph. Caught up with a guy and passed right away after calling out on your left.

I stayed my same speed, when less then a mile later the guy come right up on my tire to draft. Then slowly passes me without saying anything. So I yelled "on your right." Which must of pissed him off, so he decided to pick up the pace more and get out of his saddle.

Well to be a dick, I decided to return the favor and do what he did to me and passed but did say, "on your left again." This time he returned to his normal speed and stayed about 20 feet back when we hit the stop light about a mile down the trail waiting on the red light.

Am I the only one who handles this situation that way? I don't want some I don't know drafting me. I appreciate a call out when being passed. I think I'm getting to the grumpy old man phase. I'm also extra grumpy with people oncoming with no lights at night.
Yes. If you're going to pass someone, drop them immediately so they can't get on your wheel.

If they pass you, sit up and give them space.

I don't get the necessity for "on your left" or whatever. I don't call that out. People who would understand it are already where they need to be. People that don't are likely to swerve or do something stupid.

Quick pass and gone.
 

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Two schools of thought when saying "On your left" when passing someone.

#1 Doing so is courteous to the person you're passing.

#2 When you pass someone and say "On your left" they look to their left, inadvertently swerve, and crash into you.


I'd rather be discourteous than crashed into. I've been scolded before on trails for passing without saying "On your left". But at least I wasn't crashed into.
 

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I can understand that grumpy old man phase as well. I ride with as much consideration for others as I can. Therefore, I will do the courtesy call out of "On your left" as often as I can. However, there are no written rules for what season cyclist have come to accept as good practice. (ie, call out for traffic clear, car up, car back, pointing debris on road). I think it's good practice, however to chastise others for not doing it, I'd say you would be a bit of a dick. I must admit that I don't always call out " On your Left" as I would do it depending on how I pass. If the cyclist is on a bike lane and the road is clear, I would take the road with significantly more speed and pass without necessarily saying on your left. It is at the discretion of the one passing to ensure that he/she passes safely and that may mean calling out or not.

On the drafting side... I'd just slow down and let the guy pass instead of him drafting me.

Instead of being a dick, I tend to try to educate other cyclist rather than be confrontational, especially on these unwritten rules of cycling. However, I can be a dick when cyclist are not doing the essential requirements of being on the road i.e. no lights, not signalling, running red lights etc.
 

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I try to treat others on the road as I would like to be treated. So, if someone is swerving or taking up the lane, I will announce my presence with "on your left." If it is safe to pass, I will say nothing, as that is what I want from others.

If someone was a dick to me on the road, I will do my best to avoid him by stopping, taking a different route, running through a stop, or the like. I will only say something to a dick if he says something to me. I favor the power of silence to these few people.

Far more often, fellow riders are charming, thoughtful, and have a nice word or two for my beautiful bike.
 

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Yes. If you're going to pass someone, drop them immediately so they can't get on your wheel.

If they pass you, sit up and give them space.

I don't get the necessity for "on your left" or whatever. I don't call that out. People who would understand it are already where they need to be. People that don't are likely to swerve or do something stupid.

Quick pass and gone.
For the most part I agree with you, but the point of OYL is more than just to have someone yield to you. A rider who knows what they are doing and are "where they need to be" can still be startled by someone passing them at a significant speed where they are being dropped, which could lead to a swerve/spill. That's just one reason I can name, there are a couple more.

But overall, I agree, if you're passing someone, PASS them and keep going. If they're going to get motivated by that and latch on, let them, drop them again, or let'em pass.
 

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I handle those situations as follows.

1) OYL I reserve for children & or families, and ONLY after slowing down to their speed. Otherwise, I simply give the other rider plenty of space, quickly make my pass, and go on my way. If I am in the mood, I'll give a short greeting, i.e. "Good afternoon" or a silent peace sign.

2) If the rider I just passed proceeds to pass me further down the road, I'll usually soft pedal until they have "won" the race then I can go back to doing whatever I was doing. I don't like getting involved in the cat & mouse game.
 

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i handle those situations as follows.

1) oyl i reserve for children & or families, and only after slowing down to their speed. Otherwise, i simply give the other rider plenty of space, quickly make my pass, and go on my way. If i am in the mood, i'll give a short greeting, i.e. "good afternoon" or a silent peace sign.

2) if the rider i just passed proceeds to pass me further down the road, i'll usually soft pedal until they have "won" the race then i can go back to doing whatever i was doing. I don't like getting involved in the cat & mouse game.
this.
 

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I handle those situations as follows.

1) OYL I reserve for children & or families, and ONLY after slowing down to their speed. Otherwise, I simply give the other rider plenty of space, quickly make my pass, and go on my way. If I am in the mood, I'll give a short greeting, i.e. "Good afternoon" or a silent peace sign.

2) If the rider I just passed proceeds to pass me further down the road, I'll usually soft pedal until they have "won" the race then I can go back to doing whatever I was doing. I don't like getting involved in the cat & mouse game.
This is what I'll do most of time as well. If there is enough room and the rider doesn't appear to be riding sketchy, I'll just pass without saying anything. I've had multiple situations where idiot just moves the wrong direction if I say something like "on your left" or whatever. What actually makes more sense IMO is what they teach you when riding on a track, where you say "stick" meaning hold your line and don't move either direction. But, the general public doesn't really understand that. So, passing silently usually works better where they just stay on their line, and no problems occur.

As far as someone drafting behind you... Yeah, I don't necessarily like it, but the truth of the matter is that they are the ones taking a risk in following so close behind you. If they don't wish to communicate with you and get approval, so to speak, for hanging on your wheel, then they are risking going down because they can't see what's coming or know how you're going to move. So, you could just let them pass, but most of the time I'll just keep riding on and ignore them or push the pace to get rid of them.

I have had a positive experience when riding out of town in unfamiliar territory, where a random rider drafted off of me, but he eventually did communicate with me and ended up being a useful guide for me on unfamiliar roads.
 

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While passing cry out, "DING, DING, DING".

DING, DING, DING is the universally accepted sound of a BELL being used to announce a bicycle encroaching upon another's space.

Crying out DING, DING, DING, assumes you are too cool to actually have a bell on your bars. If you are NOT too cool and actually have a bell on your bars then use it as it was designed.

Now to the issue of riders jumping onto your wheel: Move to the right, allow the rider to come along side and then make pleasant non-threatening conversation.

Really, isn't this all in a book somewhere?
 

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For the most part I agree with you, but the point of OYL is more than just to have someone yield to you. A rider who knows what they are doing and are "where they need to be" can still be startled by someone passing them at a significant speed where they are being dropped, which could lead to a swerve/spill. That's just one reason I can name, there are a couple more.

But overall, I agree, if you're passing someone, PASS them and keep going. If they're going to get motivated by that and latch on, let them, drop them again, or let'em pass.
well if you need to warn people there probably was not enough space in the first place.
 

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If your on a trail, that is tight, I like to give the others a head's up I'm coming around. Especially if they are really holding me up. Most the trails around here are ST, so you both got to be on board with the pass.
If they just never get over, I just blow by them somewhere where it is open.

I don't like others following close, friend or foe, just to sketchy on the ST.
 

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Had a situation when riding Monday night and not sure if I handled it correctly.

I was riding down the trail with very little to no traffic. I was cruising along around 19 mph. Caught up with a guy and passed right away after calling out on your left.

I stayed my same speed, when less then a mile later the guy come right up on my tire to draft. Then slowly passes me without saying anything. So I yelled "on your right." Which must of pissed him off, so he decided to pick up the pace more and get out of his saddle.

Well to be a dick, I decided to return the favor and do what he did to me and passed but did say, "on your left again." This time he returned to his normal speed and stayed about 20 feet back when we hit the stop light about a mile down the trail waiting on the red light.

Am I the only one who handles this situation that way? I don't want some I don't know drafting me. I appreciate a call out when being passed. I think I'm getting to the grumpy old man phase. I'm also extra grumpy with people oncoming with no lights at night.
Fun, wasn't it? :D

You spurred this guy to get his act together by passing him. He then shows off a little by passing you. So you say, "Aha. He's messing with me and I'll show him who's boss!" And pass him again. The trick is to drop the guy enough so he doesn't try to catch you. Sometimes a mile isn't enough. He'll eventually catch up when you ease up a little to recover.

When I don't want to play this oneupmanship I let him go a quarter mile or so ahead and then pace behind him at that speed. If he slows down and I catch him, which is often the case, I'll pass the sucker and TT for at least another couple of miles, so he gives up exceeding his speed limit!

People do that in cars, too. A lot.
 

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#2 When you pass someone and say "On your left" they look to their left, inadvertently swerve, and crash into you.
That's the only reason I never say "On your left". I just slow down and try to give them as much space as possible. Works for me so far..
 

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With all these Pokemon Go people out hunting cartoons and this is your big problem. Should people honk as they pass you on the freeway as well. Get over it. I generally do not an anounce my intentions of passing another cyclist unless the rider is all over the place and my safety is an issue. If you are holding your line and get passed in a safe manner what difference does it make. For what it's worth it I were to be passed it would not matter if an announcement was made, not going to be heard over Ride the Lightning on my ear buds any way. But I practice situational awareness and keep pretty good tabs of what's going on around me. I stay to the right unless I am passing some one any way, much like driving.
 

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You spurred this guy to get his act together by passing him. He then shows off a little by passing you. So you say, "Aha. He's messing with me and I'll show him who's boss!" And pass him again. The trick is to drop the guy enough so he doesn't try to catch you. Sometimes a mile isn't enough. He'll eventually catch up when you ease up a little to recover.

When I don't want to play this oneupmanship I let him go a quarter mile or so ahead and then pace behind him at that speed. If he slows down and I catch him, which is often the case, I'll pass the sucker and TT for at least another couple of miles, so he gives up exceeding his speed limit!
This is the exact reason why I soft pedal when somebody passes me (after I just passed them).

:rolleyes:
 

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But, the general public doesn't really understand that.
There are many simple things the general public doesn't understand even if it's just basic common sense item. You may be shocked at what I've seen / heard from the general public around where I am when I said "on your left". One example was posted here.
 
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