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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shortly I'm going to have some time on my hands but it turns out I haven't run out of ambition.

I'd like to take better shots. How the heck does one go about getting better???
 

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Power Napper
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2,853 Posts
Same way one get's to Carnegie Hall...:D
 

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I think the quality of pics you post on here is stellar, but if you were interested in learning more, maybe take some classes at a local college art dept? Some schools have greatly reduced fees (or in my school's case, free!) for students past a certain age. Generally it's ~65yrs or so. I can think of lots of classes that might be good, even something like art history would possibly give you some inspiration for new "styles", etc. by learning about the works of the masters.

Even though I've not technically STARTED my career yet, it's something I've already thought about doing when I retire.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
theBreeze said:
Same way one get's to Carnegie Hall...:D
Take the subway?

:idea:

Getting to Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall is located at the corner of 57th Street and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan. View a map.

Entrances
Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage—elevators or stairs off the main lobby
Weill Recital Hall—at 154 West 57th Street
Zankel Hall—on Seventh Avenue between 56th Street and 57th Street

Public Transportation

By Subway
A, B, C, D, or 1 to Columbus Circle
N, Q, R, or W to 57 St./Seventh Avenue
E to Seventh Avenue

By Bus
M5, M6, M7, M30, M57, and M104 stop nearby.
 

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eminence grease
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18,538 Posts
Practice and peer review.

When I was studying for my MFA, peer review was the one and only way I was able to gain any additional knowledge. Problem is, people have agendas and jealousy often factors into their assessments. But, amidst the chaff there are always a few insights worth gleening. Art shows are great, but you don't get to talk to the people viewing.

I'd find some topical workshops (landscape, architecture, nature) or audit some graduate level photo classes, just to listen to what the professor has to say and to see how your fellow students relate to your work. Specific workshops narrow down the areas of focus so that you can concentrate on what interests you the most.
 

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Find out what you like to shoot most. Your subject of interest. When I started photography almost 2 years ago, I shoot everything. Nothing peculiar good at. Being a cyclist, I tended to go towards outdoor, landscape photography. Living in NYC, there aren't much landscape to look at. I then begin to pay attention to living things living in these landscape. I then got a longer lens for that. However, my shots lacked theme and emotion. They were like taking snap shots of birds. I say it was until 3 months ago I then realize that I can't just take shots of birds just because they are there. I need them to present themselves in a way that they tell me what they are doing and what they are feeling or thinking. This requires me getting myself all dirty with mud and sea water since I understand that I need to be at that place at the right light to get that shot. I have the right gear for bird photography and I longer have to worry about reach anymore.

Find out what you shoot most or what you like to shoot most. Then, look at other people's work. Understand the feeling and emotion the shot trying to convey. A shot should have feeling and emotion. And become a member of http://photography-on-the.net/forum/index.php? if you haven't. There are pros and accomplished amateurs. I think it all comes down to emotion. If you have complex emotions and you think the subject in the scene can convey that emotion, great, go for it. Take shots at it. Work with post processing to convey that emotion strongly.

Currently, I am trying to develop the eyes or emotions for street photography.
 

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Pedal Master
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2,511 Posts
Getting better is a function of greater creativity. Greter creativity is a function of howyou fuel your body/mind. Go to your nearest hydroponic gardening shop and ask the owner "How do I get more creative in my art," he'll point you in a direction.
 

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MB1 said:
Shortly I'm going to have some time on my hands but it turns out I haven't run out of ambition.

I'd like to take better shots. How the heck does one go about getting better???


I really love that shot MB. It really conveys the grandeur of it all.


Methinks you'll do just fine with all that time on your hands. :)
 
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MB1 said:
Shortly I'm going to have some time on my hands but it turns out I haven't run out of ambition.

I'd like to take better shots. How the heck does one go about getting better???
You should take up cycling.
 

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It's all ball bearings
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5,258 Posts
IMO, I would distill becoming a better artist into four "steps" (spoken like a true engineer) :wink5: :

1) Study (of art history, and of works of other modern/cutting edge artists, etc) What have they done, how, and why? Find some modern photographers whose styles you admire, and study the heck out of their work...and hell, if you can make contact with them somehow to ask them how they did certain things, why not do that too??

2) Inspiration from 1) above -- including preserving/paying tribute to elements of historical works/styles (which is something that is all too often left out in the arts these days IMO -- such as too many architects out there being let loose to design awful crap without having ever studied, understood, and appreciated architectural history)

3) Technical advancement -- that is, technique (in the case of photography, use of equipment, lighting, computer post-processing, etc)

4) Practice, practice, practice.


How are your P-shop skillz? My bro has been taking weekly online P-shop courses with some dude whose name escapes me, but my bro has really been blown away by the amount of stuff that he has learned in these courses. I could dig up the guy's name if that sounds like something that might interest you.

EDIT: Aaron Nace is the P-shop course guy: http://www.nacedesign.com/index2.html
 

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jaded bitter joy crusher
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MB1 said:
Shortly I'm going to have some time on my hands but it turns out I haven't run out of ambition.

I'd like to take better shots. How the heck does one go about getting better???
You've got some weird perspective stuff going on there.

Get a 4x6.

HTH.
 

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Spend more time doing it.
Look at other people's work and decide what you like. Start with emulation and then find your own path.
Forget studying. People get too caught up in classes and workshops and don't get out and shoot! Anything you need to learn is available on the internet. Sites like Strobist and Digital Photography School are valuable assets.
If you want to study anything I'd consider photoshop. And once again, all the information you'd find in a class is on the interwebs.

Good luck. Nice shots by the way :)

www.tober1.com
 

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Inching to 1000 (again)
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1,048 Posts
I’m guessing that you are in a rut. You have the Mall landscapes down pat and have done a nice job of defining your own style in this area. I don’t think that you can improve them unless you take a different approach. If you want to continue in this genre, you might want to try more black-and-white, different lenses or points of view. What I think you should do, however, is try something entirely different. It’s clear that you are very talented and could have been a full-time professional. If you want to keep it artsy, you can try streetscapes, portraiture, or perhaps a documentary project (say charity rides or bike shop employees, if you want to stay in the bike culture). If you don’t have one, you may also want to create a Web site to display your work.

Either way, I’m looking forward to MB1 v. 2.0.
 

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Captain Obvious
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11,876 Posts
dood, you'll have to learn how to shoot gators. or old folks.
 

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Banned
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Like Terry B said, practice and peer review.

A couple things I've seen that tend to trip photographers up- Don't get bogged down by your equipment- owning a $50,000 hasleblad will not make you a better photographer. I see that one a lot. Guys who invest in super fancy equipment and still make the same compositional errors.

You shoot well, you've got an excellent eye for detail and unless yer totally BS-ing me, you can get stuff in camera that most guys need photoshop to get. That's awesome. You've got landscape and architecture pretty well under control as well.

One thing I haven't seen from you is people shots. Miss M's back is pretty much covered, But I don't see a lot of faces in yer work. Try shooting people. That's a whole new challenge.
 
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