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Hello all. I am a long-time mountain biker who just purchased a road bike for commuting/rec rides and we'll see what else. I bought a Jamis Ventura Race last week, and have a couple commute rides under my belt (a fairly flat 23 miles round trip), but not much else (yet). So far it has been fun and a lot faster.

I have commuted on my full-sus. mtn bike for the last 4 weeks, and I am used to just mashing over everything -- curbs, grass sections, a corner of a sand volleyball pit, occasional small dogs -- in my way on the mountain bike as I commute on the river parkway and surface streets. My question is, how fragile/tough is my road bike? Can I take curbs (up or down), railroad track crossings, ect? My new bike has a carbon fork and carbon monostay, and I dont want to crack anything. By the way, I weigh about 220 lbs (for now -- down 10 lbs since I've started commuting on the bike :thumbsup: ), so I'm sure that weight is a factor for me that might not be to others. What other things to mountain bikers have to watch out for on their road bikes, aside from going faster and actually wanting to take longer routes home? Thanks in advance... I was just kidding about the small dogs. I've never brought myself to hit one, although if you tell me my bike can handle it, I might aim for the next one not on a leash!
 

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Meaning no disrespect, if you ride like a moron, you'll break it. I came from mountain biking, too, but a long time ago, before there was suspension (back when you had to RIDE the terrain, not just blast over it...) You're pretty heavy for a road roader (I weigh 240, so I have some experience with that), and you probably have skinny tires and 32 spokes or fewer in your wheels. You can LEARN to ride curbs and railroad crossings, but it's a skill you have to acquire--the bike won't do it for you the way a mountain bike will. If you just sit in the saddle and let the bike do the work, you're going to break things on every ride.
If you're determined to see how much abuse it will take, you probably should put on the fattest tires that will fit (I rarely use anything smaller than 35mm), try to "float" over obstacles by absorbing as much shock as you can with your knees and elbows, carry a spoke wrench and some spare spokes. The two branches of the sport are quite different, so accept that and learn a new skill.
FWIW, I have a Rivendell Atlantis and a Rambouillet, and I ride the Atlantis in many of the same places I used to ride my first (non-susp) mountain bike. But you have to work at it a little--you can't just sit and cruise. I save the Rambo, with skinnier tires and lighter wheels, for pavement.
 

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Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
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While it is not fragile you should think of it along the lines of a Ferrari VS Jeep. You would not expect one to due the others job well without damaging them. Hucking curbs on a road bike is NOT a good idea. Take RR tracks straight on not at and angle. Just use some common sense.
 
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