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· waterproof*
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The (very) few times that I have hit a true max hr, it was a very short spike (a couple of seconds / a few heartbeats / one or two readout updates on the HR monitor), usually following a very intense effort that left me seeing spots, gasping for air and unable to pedal for several minutes.

You might be confusing true max hr with "a very hard pace" which could be anything from "threshold" to "vo2" to a short sprint effort...
 

· Farmguy
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617 Posts
Nimitz said:
max = max...anything more = dead.

Chad
Nope, you just will pass out until you recover, at some point the body quits until you heart slows down. Now is it smart to do it all the time to that point ?, probably not.
 

· What Would Google Do.
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rydbyk said:
My max is approx. 190 (i have never seen anything higher on my HR and I have pushed to the point of near collapse a number of times)

If I was a pro in the TDF, how long would I be able to keep 184 bpm (96% max) before I puke or pass out or blow up?
the same amount of time it takes for the store owner to return after he puts up a "back soon" sign in the window while he's out.
 

· NeoRetroGrouch
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6,493 Posts
HR response is slow. If you are doing an effort that requires your heart to go to max, you will quit before it gets there. Trained, you can maintain that effort for 7-10 seconds and your HR will peak after you stop. - TF
 

· What Would Google Do.
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stevesbike said:
what's with all the heart rate questions lately? It's like a time warp to 1990.
everyone has had to sell their power meters to feed their families in these recessionary times :p
 

· always right sometimes
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
stevesbike said:
what's with all the heart rate questions lately? It's like a time warp to 1990.

Sorry....need to sell the house to get a power meter to be cool like all the "legit" 2010 riders I see. I was racing mtb bikes in 1990. It is much more common to see a HR monitor today than in 1990.

This would answer your question as to why there might be more questions today in 2010 vs. 1990....in case you were really interested and not just being condescending.

Now, do you have any useful feedback for me? I mean, afterall, you do have 20 years of HR info under your belt.
 

· What Would Google Do.
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heres something which you might not be aware of and some of us are saying what we are, hr is VERY unstable on a day to day basis, so many things effect it for instance heat, humidity, cold, stress, anxiety, fatigue..the list goes on! and so because of this your heart rate will have different max on different days its a very good indicator of effort, but is limited and saying how long can you sustain max is the wrong question really, the fact its your max means you cannot sustain it so, seconds, 5 maybe and thats a push if it truely is your max hr.
 

· Shirtcocker
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muscleendurance said:
heres something which you might not be aware of and some of us are saying what we are, hr is VERY unstable on a day to day basis, so many things effect it for instance heat, humidity, cold, stress, anxiety, fatigue..the list goes on! and so because of this your heart rate will have different max on different days its a very good indicator of effort, but is limited and saying how long can you sustain max is the wrong question really, the fact its your max means you cannot sustain it so, seconds, 5 maybe and thats a push if it truely is your max hr.
Max heart rates are all over the place. Most people don't have a clue what their max is and any formula that says it calculates your max is only a guess. The 220-age one is especially bad as it assumes a sedentary individual. No reason you have to lose a beat a year if you keep in shape. It will go down as you age, but not nearly that fast. Think of max this way. If you do sprint repeats till you puke you're probably still 5 beats or so away from max.
 

· What Would Google Do.
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hrumpole said:
Ok, then how bout this--how long do pros last over threshold? Or is the threshold so high that there simply isn't that much headroom?
the same as the rest of us who are trained but not necessarily pros:thumbsup:
1hr+ they just go faster while they are there.
 

· Cycling Coach
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hrumpole said:
Ok, then how bout this--how long do pros last over threshold? Or is the threshold so high that there simply isn't that much headroom?
HR is not a measure of threshold, so the question really doesn't make a lot of sense.

One typically experiences a range of HRs when riding at threshold levels.
 

· Registered
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rydbyk said:
Sorry....need to sell the house to get a power meter to be cool like all the "legit" 2010 riders I see. I was racing mtb bikes in 1990. It is much more common to see a HR monitor today than in 1990.

This would answer your question as to why there might be more questions today in 2010 vs. 1990....in case you were really interested and not just being condescending.

Now, do you have any useful feedback for me? I mean, afterall, you do have 20 years of HR info under your belt.
actually, I was using a heart rate monitor back in 1982 - it was a wired model. If you want to train with a heart monitor, do a field test, find your heart rate that corresponds to various training levels, and have at it. Get a book like heart zones cycling for more info. But don't worry about meaningless issues like how long you can maintain your max heart rate - it's a maximum so will be by definition the highest single value you record. And don't worry about how it compares to other people - that's meaningless as well. FWIW, a power meter isn't really that expensive. You can find a powertap on ebay for well under $1k. It's by far the best training tool I've ever purchased.
 

· always right sometimes
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
stevesbike said:
actually, I was using a heart rate monitor back in 1982 - it was a wired model. If you want to train with a heart monitor, do a field test, find your heart rate that corresponds to various training levels, and have at it. Get a book like heart zones cycling for more info. But don't worry about meaningless issues like how long you can maintain your max heart rate - it's a maximum so will be by definition the highest single value you record. And don't worry about how it compares to other people - that's meaningless as well. FWIW, a power meter isn't really that expensive. You can find a powertap on ebay for well under $1k. It's by far the best training tool I've ever purchased.

Yeh..I guess it is "meaningless". I was keeping track of how long it was taking me at NEAR max to feel like quitting. Then I thought, "Hey...are other riders able to withstand more perhaps..am I being a pu**y...OR is it totally normal to feel like crap at near max after a short period of time..."
 
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