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· pass the hot sauce
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197 Posts
Can't give you a mileage estimate as it varies quite a bit based on riding conditions and braking habits. Here in Oregon, I ride year round and it takes quite a toll on my wheels. The water and road grime is super abrasive. I start to worry about wheels I have ridden for more than 3 or 4 winters. Out here, any of the competent mechanics are able to tell you if your wheels are safe by measuring sidewall thickness using precision calipers. Not really sure what the technique is, but I would imagine they compare one part of the sidewall with the brake affected area.

Now, having said that, if I rode in mostly dry conditions I would not worry about my wheels for a long time.
 

· Cannot bench own weight
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4,298 Posts
I have a couple sets of Ksyriums, one for dry use and one for wet use. The wet ones have less miles on them, yet you can actually see and feel where the brake surface has been wearing away. Some of it was negligence on my part as I wasn't always good about wiping of f the rims and pads after each of those rides.
 

· Registered
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58 Posts
steel515 said:
what are some typical mileage you get on the braking surface from for example, a mavic open pro rim? when do you know its time to replace?
The text below is a quote from a Mavic document called "Wear_Tear_Indicator.pdf" from http://www.tech-mavic.com/ (username: "mavic-com" password : "dealer" )

"When there is too much wear & tear on the rim, a little hole appears on each of the 2 braking surfaces on the rim. Depending on the adjustment of the brake
pads, it is possible for the wear & tear indicator to appear on only one of the 2 braking surfaces. In any case, the appearance of the wear & tear indicator
on at least one of the 2 braking surfaces, means that the sidewalls are too thin , and it could be dangerous to continue to use the rim. It should be
replaced as soon as possible.
The position of the wear indicator is marked by 2 yellow arrows on the stickers on the rim, opposite the valve hole."

The above wear indicator (the appearence of the two tiny holes) is called internal wear & tear indicator. The external wear & tear indicator on Mavic rims like cxp 22 is a long groove on the braking surface. When the groove on one side of the rim is about to disappear, one should replace the rim.

I assume that rims such as Mavic Open Pro and Mavic cxp 33 has internal wear & tear indicator, but the only rims that I could actually find information about was the Mavic A 319 and A 719 rims. Perhaps someone know more, or is able dig out the information from the "secret" Mavic site.

--
Regards
 

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453 Posts
All Mavic rims should have both types of indicators. I'd pay more attention to the external (because it's easier to see). Just look at the groove in the middle of the wear surface, if it looks a bit thin you're going to want to think about a new rim. It should take quite a while.
 

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2,286 Posts
i agree w/ conditons in general... including rider weight. IME w/ cars, heavy ones DESTROY brake pads and discs. I imagine this could be the same if not worse w/ bikes since a 'heavy' rider could easily be putting 20-30% more momentum through the wheels, which of course needs to be dissipated by the brakes... Again, if used heavily on downhills this would put a much larger toll on the wheels than a lighter rider on flats.
Of course, in regard to buying second hand rims, you'ld want to keep PO rider's weight, and riding habits (terrain) into consideration anyway.

ps: I wouldn't buy my ventos w/ similar mileage from me, i hit metal sleepers at 30km+ when i first got them, trying to think of all the other stuff it hit too, lol. No issues at all with my rims, but yeah... 185lbs+/- here.
 
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