Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been riding very roughly 100 miles per week on a new bike since the end of May. The rear pads are completely worn down. Admittedly I am clinging to the brakes like a gerbil on greased teflon because (a) I am afraid of re-breaking my ankle, (b) I live and ride in a very hilly area, and (c) I suck at biking, and have been riding the rear brake too much. Nonetheless, this struck me as rather quick, since my mountain bike pads seem to last about six years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,934 Posts
My rain bike has discs and the pads are pretty worn now after about 1400 miles on it, but the pads are used in the wet mostly so wear quicker. I've heard cross bikes can burn up a set in a weekend easily. Your bike has probably similar miles to mine from your comments, seems pretty quick but if you are riding the brakes a lot it's going to wear them quicker obviously - so it's not unbelievable they are in need of replacement to me.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,667 Posts
As Kerry would ask, "how long is a piece of string?"

There is no way to answer your question because it's so dependent on so many different things. One thing you really need to get away from is using the rear brake so much. All you're really accomplishing is wearing out pads much faster than you should. The rear brake has very little power compared to the front. As soon as you use either brake, some of your weight transfers to the front wheel, it's variable and depends on speed and braking force. A really good way to illustrate weight transfer is go ride a full suspension mtb and grab the front brake. Watch the fork compress and the shock extend. The front brake slows you down wayyyyyyy more quickly and effectively than the rear. Use it when you need it, then let it go. Use it in a straight line...this means knowing where you're going and when to brake as well as when not to.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I clearly need to brake more evenly. Unfortunately, it is a completely irrational fear response. Oddly, I don't seem to do this on my squishy mtn bike.

I'm over-doing it mostly on 10% grades, which pretty much includes all the local roads in my neighborhood. (I live near a place where Lance Armstrong fell off his bike.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Yeah, I clearly need to brake more evenly. Unfortunately, it is a completely irrational fear response. Oddly, I don't seem to do this on my squishy mtn bike.

I'm over-doing it mostly on 10% grades, which pretty much includes all the local roads in my neighborhood. (I live near a place where Lance Armstrong fell off his bike.)
I hear France is nice.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, but I don't like cheese and am running low on white flags at the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
They'll last anywhere from 100 miles to 1250 miles depending on riding conditions and quality of pad. Not bad huh? actually that's quite bad considering that rim pads easily last 5 times longer and cost 3 times less to replace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
Oh wait... you mean disk brakes don't last as long, cost more, and require special installation procedures??? I thought they were so much better than rim brakes??? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
Oh wait... you mean disk brakes don't last as long, cost more, and require special installation procedures??? I thought they were so much better than rim brakes??? ;)
Ehh, no! The only real thing disk brakes are good for are MTB riders who get good and sloppy while riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,934 Posts
Ehh, no! The only real thing disk brakes are good for are MTB riders who get good and sloppy while riding.
They are much better than rim brakes in the rain on a road bike, dry pavement not as good. They also don't wear out the brake track like rim brakes, rotors are cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
They are much better than rim brakes in the rain on a road bike, dry pavement not as good. They also don't wear out the brake track like rim brakes, rotors are cheap.
The rotors only last about 2 years if you're an average rider, plus the pad issue. A rim will last easily 40,000 miles. So lets say you ride an average of 2,500 miles a year, that's 16 years on a rim. So in that 16 years you would have to replace the rotor (just figure one wheel here and simply times it by two to get both) that would be 8 rotors in 16 years or $280 for an average $35 per rotor; now add in the average cost of the pads of about $15 and they last an average of 1200 miles or 33 pads or $495 in pads. That's $775 in brake parts over 40,000 miles, I doubt the average cyclist spends $775 per rim. Now how long does rim pads last, Salmon Kool Stops will last at least 10,000 miles and probably a lot longer but lets go with 10,000 and at $14 which mounts to only $56 in brake parts over 40,000 miles.

But we left out one important fact, disk brakes require a lot more attention than rim brakes. Rim brakes also have a far better mechanical advantage since the entire rim is the rotor and thus heat is dissipated faster, less stress on spokes which means less tinkering with adjusting spokes or replacing broken ones, no risk of overheating your hubs bearings. Disk brakes almost always have a constant degree of rubbing because the rotors are not perfectly trued and the pads are very close to the rotors so that they will rub on the high spots. And you can't just put disk brakes on any bike, you have to get a beefier fork, redish the wheels. In the long run rim brakes will cost less and have less hassles, again there are exceptions like the MTB or Cross bike rider who gets very mucky while riding.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If I didn't live in a mountainous area, I probably wouldn't have bothered with discs. I ride this thing both on and off road, FWIW.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
If I didn't live in a mountainous area, I probably wouldn't have bothered with discs. I ride this thing both on and off road, FWIW.
Wrong reason! I use to live in S California and rode a lot of mountain roads from San Bernardino National Forest mountains to Idyllwild area to Angeles National Forest mountains to Los Padres National Forest mountains and never had an issue with rim brakes and neither did any of my racing and riding buddies. But so what you scream? will then don't consider what I've done instead consider all the pro racers who raced faster than I did down steeper mountain roads than I did all over Europe for many many years and never did mass pro riders go plummeting off those mountain roads due to "bad" rim brakes, in fact I could not find one incident where a pro racer lost his life due to brake failure. In fact you take a good chance of frying your hub bearings from the heat of the disk!

All I'm saying is that using the excuse of riding in a mountainous area is pure rubbish to buy disk brakes, you bought into a bunch of hype is all you've done. Now there is an issue with carbon wheels that could get too hot and rim brakes go into a fade type of problem, or the rims delaminate which supposedly has been cured by name brand CF wheels, not so much for the cheap generic Chinese made ones.

Also don't buy into the marketing hype you can stop faster with disk brakes vs rim brakes because it simply is not true. The real factor in how fast you stop is entirely wrapped up in tire adhesion to the road, and in that involves the tire, PSI, road surface, weather conditions, rider and bike weight. A friend and I got into this one time when he told me that dual pivot brakes that he has stop faster than my old style single pivot (remember that debate? similar to this one!) We discovered that they both stopped in the same distance even with us using different tires but same 23 width (we even swapped bikes to see if a different rider would have different result). If any of you have disk brakes and knows someone with rim brakes that use the same width tires try the experiment and see for yourself.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,667 Posts
Wrong reason! I use to live in S California and rode a lot of mountain roads from San Bernardino National Forest mountains to Idyllwild area to Angeles National Forest mountains to Los Padres National Forest mountains and never had an issue with rim brakes and neither did any of my racing and riding buddies. But so what you scream? will then don't consider what I've done instead consider all the pro racers who raced faster than I did down steeper mountain roads than I did all over Europe for many many years and never did mass pro riders go plummeting off those mountain roads due to "bad" rim brakes, in fact I could not find one incident where a pro racer lost his life due to brake failure. In fact you take a good chance of frying your hub bearings from the heat of the disk!

All I'm saying is that using the excuse of riding in a mountainous area is pure rubbish to buy disk brakes, you bought into a bunch of hype is all you've done. Now there is an issue with carbon wheels that could get too hot and rim brakes go into a fade type of problem, or the rims delaminate which supposedly has been cured by name brand CF wheels, not so much for the cheap generic Chinese made ones.

Also don't buy into the marketing hype you can stop faster with disk brakes vs rim brakes because it simply is not true. The real factor in how fast you stop is entirely wrapped up in tire adhesion to the road, and in that involves the tire, PSI, road surface, weather conditions, rider and bike weight. A friend and I got into this one time when he told me that dual pivot brakes that he has stop faster than my old style single pivot (remember that debate? similar to this one!) We discovered that they both stopped in the same distance even with us using different tires but same 23 width (we even swapped bikes to see if a different rider would have different result). If any of you have disk brakes and knows someone with rim brakes that use the same width tires try the experiment and see for yourself.
You've obviously never ridden the new Shimano hydro discs. I don't own them, but I've spent some time on them and they are more powerful. And you can use it. With less effort and fantastic control. I'm not on a mission to get a new bike that has them, but holy sh*t...they really work well.

It's the same argument you see w/ cars and motorcycles. The armchair physists saying that if you have enough power to lock up the wheel, you can't stop any quicker no matter what you do. You don't need any more power if you can lock up the wheel.

It's really complete crap. Every new car and motorcycle generation has had more powerful brakes that are more easily modulated. That's the key element...more control. You are definitely limited by traction, but if you have more power that is easily controlled, you will be able to slow down more consistently all the way down a descent and also for multiple descents.

There is no way in hell I'd ride a bike w/ BRS200 brakes when I could ride one w/ hydro discs. Sure, they'll both lock up the wheel, but you're completely brain dead if you can't see the advantage of the better brake.

Look at CX racers. They'd be the last guys on earth you'd think would want or need disc brakes. Not much traction...pretty moderate speeds...very few if any descents at all. But despite all that, probably 80% of the elite cx racers in the US are using disc brake bikes. Huh. Wonder why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
you've obviously never ridden the new shimano hydro discs. I don't own them, but i've spent some time on them and they are more powerful. And you can use it. With less effort and fantastic control. I'm not on a mission to get a new bike that has them, but holy sh*t...they really work well.

It's the same argument you see w/ cars and motorcycles. The armchair physists saying that if you have enough power to lock up the wheel, you can't stop any quicker no matter what you do. You don't need any more power if you can lock up the wheel.

It's really complete crap. Every new car and motorcycle generation has had more powerful brakes that are more easily modulated. That's the key element...more control. You are definitely limited by traction, but if you have more power that is easily controlled, you will be able to slow down more consistently all the way down a descent and also for multiple descents.

There is no way in hell i'd ride a bike w/ brs200 brakes when i could ride one w/ hydro discs. Sure, they'll both lock up the wheel, but you're completely brain dead if you can't see the advantage of the better brake.

Look at cx racers. They'd be the last guys on earth you'd think would want or need disc brakes. Not much traction...pretty moderate speeds...very few if any descents at all. But despite all that, probably 80% of the elite cx racers in the us are using disc brake bikes. Huh. Wonder why?
bs...
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top