Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 2 years and 7 months, my rear Neuvation M28 Aero flange broke at a spoke hole. Is this a reasonable time for a wheel to last? I am not complaining; I sent John an email, he said the wheel was out of warranty, but that should not have happened. Two days later I received a brand new M28 Aero 3 wheel, postpaid, with a free return label for the old wheel.
 

·
Shirtcocker
Joined
·
60,886 Posts
denmikseb said:
After 2 years and 7 months, my rear Neuvation M28 Aero flange broke at a spoke hole. Is this a reasonable time for a wheel to last? I am not complaining; I sent John an email, he said the wheel was out of warranty, but that should not have happened. Two days later I received a brand new M28 Aero 3 wheel, postpaid, with a free return label for the old wheel.
About 2 years and 7 months I guess. :D Pretty nice he gave you a new wheel when it was past warranty. How large is the profit margin on those suckers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bocephus Jones II said:
About 2 years and 7 months I guess. :D Pretty nice he gave you a new wheel when it was past warranty. How large is the profit margin on those suckers?
I don't know, but it can't be too high at the low prices he charges. Now is there anyone out there that can give me a serious answer to my question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
934 Posts
IMO, a wheel (except an ultralight race wheel) should last indefinitely unless crashed, but the laws of physics and materials science refuse to respect my opinion.

Anyway, it appears a lot of the original M28 Aeros had problems there, my M28 Aero 2 was explicitly marked "upgraded rear flange" or something similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,375 Posts
denmikseb said:
After 2 years and 7 months, my rear Neuvation M28 Aero flange broke at a spoke hole. Is this a reasonable time for a wheel to last?
In 2000, Jobst Brandt had a set of wheels with 200,000 miles on them. I imagine it's considerably more now. Though, I don't think time is exactly the best way to measure longevity. My 36 spoke Ambrosio's from 1986 look great and I expect them to last at least another 22 years. The fact that I stopped using them about 18 years ago might have something to do with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
String analogy

denmikseb said:
I don't know, but it can't be too high at the low prices he charges. Now is there anyone out there that can give me a serious answer to my question?
You're really asking the equivalent of "How long is a piece of string?" There are a lot of variables, so the range is quite large. There really is no useful answer to your question until you start throwing out some numbers about body weight, riding style, spoke count, rim weight, tire width/pressure, road quality, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,651 Posts
Quite possibly the age a wheelset will last may be dependent on the amount of money that is spent on it. I say this because I cannot get a low spoke low cost wheelset, including Mr. Neugents, to last longer than 3,000 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,286 Posts
Hooben said:
Quite possibly the age a wheelset will last may be dependent on the amount of money that is spent on it. I say this because I cannot get a low spoke low cost wheelset, including Mr. Neugents, to last longer than 3,000 miles.
3k ? wth are u doing to them? geez... anyway, check out some campy khamsins or fulcrum 7s... if u break those i'd be impressed... insane amount of wheel for the money... insane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
asgelle said:
In 2000, Jobst Brandt had a set of wheels with 200,000 miles on them. I imagine it's considerably more now.
Probably over 300,000... but this with regular rim replacements when worn or damaged, spoke replacements when broken (some are still original), and cup and cone replacements on the hubs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
Bocephus Jones II said:
Pretty nice he gave you a new wheel when it was past warranty. How large is the profit margin on those suckers?
Chinese bike parts and building costs can be very cheap if you buy in quantity. I'd guess that his cost per wheelset is $50-$75... so it's cheaper to replace wheels than fix them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Ha!

rruff said:
Probably over 300,000... but this with regular rim replacements when worn or damaged, spoke replacements when broken (some are still original), and cup and cone replacements on the hubs.
That reminds me of the 100 year old axe that's been passed down through the family. The handle has been replaced 6 times and the head 4 times, but the axe itself is 100 years old :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
Yah... I guess the hub bodies and some of the spokes are original. Jobst was quite upset that he could not get MA2 rims anymore, and his stockpile was running low...

In answer to the OP... breaking the hub is a pretty serious failure. In general I'd expect a set of light wheels to last ~20k miles before the rims would need replacing from the brake track wearing down... but this is highly variable depending on how much rain riding you do, steep descents, type of brake pad, etc. In that time you'd probably need to have some or all of the bearings replaced, but everything else should survive... IMO. I would hope that hubs would last a long time before breaking. Most likely the Neuvation hubs were defective (poorly designed or defective alloy) and the new ones are likely better.
 

·
Old, slow, and fat.
Joined
·
3,897 Posts
StellaBlue said:
4 ever if you don't use it . 5 seconds if your drive over it in your car . Somewhere in the middle under normal use.
That about sums it up.

I'm training on a front wheel that was built for a buddy of mine that raced for Subaru-Montgomery 'way back when' (appx 20 years ago) that's still doin fine. Relaced the rear wheel 'cause it was originally built on a FW hub.

I've got several pairs of hubs that have been in one wheel or another for about as long as the wheel above. Most prominent are the GF's 600 hubs laced into MA40 rims.

I do believe that you really want 'normal' wheels vs the low spoke count jobbies.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the replies. I thought that less than 3 years on a wheel that gets about 8 hours of use per week was lame. The old hub had scallops cut out between the spoke holes on both flanges. The new one has a solid flange on the drive side, that's the side that broke on the old hub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,301 Posts
Do a search & it's not hard to find lots of reports of bike wheel failures. Lighter, low-spoke count wheels seem to have a higher failure rate. I've seen several failures myself on various rides (inc. some high $$ brand names).
But usage patterns & maintenance are critical in any wheel's longevity, and main reasons to be careful buying a used wheelset. Clydesdales tend to be tough on wheels. And some riders just beat-up their wheels. I was on a ride just this AM with a local racer who had a knack for hitting potholes on group rides. She would get distracted talking and BAM, another hole hit. During a race she is smooooth, but I would never buy her training wheels;)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top