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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is only my 4th season of riding, so I still consider myself a newb when it comes to equipment...

I recently replaced my rear tire, as it was worn out (threads starting to show in a few places). I got 2000 miles out of it, and I weigh 170.

It was a Vredestein Fortezza Tri-Comp. Is that a decent/average number of miles to get out of a rear road tire?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hank Stamper said:
If your goal is to 'get miles' out of tires, no, it's horrible.
If they are high performance tires and that is your goal that's about average for miles.
Most of my riding is commuting, so I'm not very concerned about speed (although I do use the same bike for an occasional triathlon).

If there are tires that are known to last much longer (and aren't a whole lot more expensive), I'm all ears.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
rruff said:
My rear tire mileage has ranged from ~500mi for Conti SS to 3000mi for Conti GP4000S. Michelin Pro3s ~1500, Krylions ~2000, Challenge Criterium ~1200.
I've been doing some more research since my initial post, and given the price of the Vredesteins, they seem to do pretty well in terms of longevity. The Conti 4000s seem to last longer, but they also cost more.
 

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Haven't kept track of my previous tires so much. But my Vredestien Fortezza's been on road for at least 2,000mi, and then been on the regularly-used trainer for half a year. They kinda cleaned up on the trainer, and have no cracks.

I had a Michelin Lithion that probably saw ~1,600miles. Was cracking long before that, but seemed to hold and grip well regardless. Just said "**** it" one day and stop taking my chances.
 

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feh said:
This is only my 4th season of riding, so I still consider myself a newb when it comes to equipment...

I recently replaced my rear tire, as it was worn out (threads starting to show in a few places). I got 2000 miles out of it, and I weigh 170.

It was a Vredestein Fortezza Tri-Comp. Is that a decent/average number of miles to get out of a rear road tire?

Thanks.
If you do a lot of serious climbing, expect 1700. Flat riding, expect maybe 2100
 

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About 2,000 miles from French-made Krylions. A few hundred miles less with the Asian-made ones. About 2,500 miles from Rubino Pros. 1,811 miles from Schwalbe Durano Plus – still lots of tread left, so we'll see. 1,800 miles from Armadillos.
 

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I got about 3200 miles out of my Conti 4000.... The front got rotated to the back and a new went up front. The swapped tire is now over 4000 miles and still running strong. I have 2 tires waiting in the event I need them!
 

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feh said:
Most of my riding is commuting, so I'm not very concerned about speed (although I do use the same bike for an occasional triathlon).

If there are tires that are known to last much longer (and aren't a whole lot more expensive), I'm all ears.

Thanks!
I love the Tri Comps but would never use them as communting tires. Try the Quattro's they have the same grip but are a bit heaver with a thicker zone in the middle for wear and puncture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
jcjordan said:
I love the Tri Comps but would never use them as communting tires. Try the Quattro's they have the same grip but are a bit heaver with a thicker zone in the middle for wear and puncture.
The tri-comps were an unusual purchase for me; they were on sale for a very low price. All of my other tires have been Fortezza SEs.
 

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Flats & worn tires

Dutch77 said:
That's what I figured... I'm getting a lot of flats though, even though I can still see the dimples quite well. I guess I'll switch them out and see...
Lots of people talk about getting more flats as their tires wear, but I'd be very surprised if anyone collected actual data to show such a correlation. The tire casing is MUCH thicker than the rubber tread, so unless you're in an area where the "puncture vectors" are shorter than a tire casing + new tread but longer than a tire casing is thick, it's unlikely that your tire wear is the source of your flats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Kerry Irons said:
Lots of people talk about getting more flats as their tires wear, but I'd be very surprised if anyone collected actual data to show such a correlation. The tire casing is MUCH thicker than the rubber tread, so unless you're in an area where the "puncture vectors" are shorter than a tire casing + new tread but longer than a tire casing is thick, it's unlikely that your tire wear is the source of your flats.
Purely anecdotal, but I've had 3 flats the last 3 years, and all of them occurred when the tread was quite worn.
 
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