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After a recent thread on how much the riders spent in search of the right saddle, I figured I would ask the same about the handlebar.

I just did a test ride with a new handlebar I bought and liked it so much and decided to shelf the old one. Then when I opened the storage closet, I realized there are 6 other handlebars collecting dust. If I have to guess the total cost so far, it's somewhere around $400.

So, how much have you spent in search of the right handlebar? After all, it is one of 3 contact points thus an important component when it comes to tangible comfort.
 

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I've gone from Cinelli model 66 to the Cinelli 64 as I'm not as flexible as I once was. But I put a set of Maes bars on the bike that I ride the most and those are my new favorite.
 

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I have moved to 'short 'n shallow'. Round Al. Not too anatomic on the bend. Narrow. Preferably.

But I haven't tried the aero or bladed carbon hbars. Don't know why not, as the feel of my carbon Campy levers is so sleek.

edit: since most of my vintage bikes have Cinelli stems = Campione d' Mundo over the Giros is my preference in that market.
 

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I have moved to 'short 'n shallow'. Round Al. Not too anatomic on the bend. Narrow. Preferably.

But I haven't tried the aero or bladed carbon hbars. Don't know why not, as the feel of my carbon Campy levers is so sleek.

edit: since most of my vintage bikes have Cinelli stems = Campione d' Mundo over the Giros is my preference in that market.
Question, Why deep bars on the vintage bikes while moving to short and shallow on the rest?
 

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shallow would look anachronistic on a vintage bike.

As for me, I am looking for something long-n-shallow. Would like more reach to the levers, and considering some randonneur bars .. but the drop is too much of the ones I have seen.
 

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shallow would look anachronistic on a vintage bike.

As for me, I am looking for something long-n-shallow. Would like more reach to the levers, and considering some randonneur bars .. but the drop is too much of the ones I have seen.
Sorry but that is just perception, especially considering that they both existed in the same time frame. Besides, it is more about comfort than fashion. Like I said earlier once upon a time I could ride the drops of the 66's, no problem, but as I aged I found it more difficult to get into the drops. Once I swapped out to the 64's I was once again able to ride the drops comfortably.

But that's just me.

If you're looking for a bar with more reach, check out the Maes bend bars, they're nice and long. They have them at Grand Cru Course Handlebar- Classic Round Bend - Handlebars - Components for $60, $29 for Grand Cru Course Handlebar, Noir - Handlebars - Components.
Or https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/handlebars/maes-parallel-254-handlebars/ has them for $115-125. Compass also has them in 31.8 to fit modern stems.
 

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How much have I spent? Approximately $0. I had the stock bars on my first bike, then I sold it and built up a new ride from the frame up. I happened to find a used set of EC90's in a box at my LBS and liberated them for my own use (I asked, I did not steal). That was couple of bikes ago and I just keep swapping them over.
I would guess I'm around 45,000 miles on those bars.
 

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Sorry but that is just perception, especially considering that they both existed in the same time frame. Besides, it is more about comfort than fashion. Like I said earlier once upon a time I could ride the drops of the 66's, no problem, but as I aged I found it more difficult to get into the drops. Once I swapped out to the 64's I was once again able to ride the drops comfortably.

But that's just me.

If you're looking for a bar with more reach, check out the Maes bend bars, they're nice and long. They have them at Grand Cru Course Handlebar- Classic Round Bend - Handlebars - Components for $60, $29 for Grand Cru Course Handlebar, Noir - Handlebars - Components.
Or https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/handlebars/maes-parallel-254-handlebars/ has them for $115-125. Compass also has them in 31.8 to fit modern stems.
Wow, nice bars! They're as deep as the Cinelli 66, nice and squared off for the hands, more extended in the drops, so you got more room to move around on them in any position. Velo Orange comes through again! :thumbsup:

I'm still on Cinelli 66, both bikes. Always liked the range of positioning they offer.

Yeah, ya gotta stay flexible on them. Get that yoga going, Velodog! :D

Had to replace them a few times after bending them narrower in accidents, about $35. Now they're NOS around $100 on ebay.
 

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I rode whatever was stock until a few years ago when I had to replace a pair due to a crash and after researching extensively decided on the FSA K-Wing.

The are too expensive in a sense, but I fell in love with the ergo-dynamics of them.

It's the only bar I'll ever ride if I can help it... I've got them on both my primary and backup rides, and a pair of EC90's on the indoor trainer frame.
 

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Question, Why deep bars on the vintage bikes while moving to short and shallow on the rest?
I wouldn't call Cinelli bars of the 'deep drop' variety, altho certainly more than bars on my more modern bikes.

The vintage bikes are generally used for more 'casual' rides. If the ride has lots of hills, mts, or faster riders i opt for brifters & more gears for optimal cadence. I can still hammer on the vintage but when out solo or on less challenging terrain.

I should also add that with my 59/60cm frames the headtubes are sufficiently long to permit easy use of the drops, even with the quill stem at or near max insertion.
 

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I wouldn't call Cinelli bars of the 'deep drop' variety, altho certainly more than bars on my more modern bikes.

The vintage bikes are generally used for more 'casual' rides. If the ride has lots of hills, mts, or faster riders i opt for brifters & more gears for optimal cadence. I can still hammer on the vintage but when out solo or on less challenging terrain.

I should also add that with my 59/60cm frames the headtubes are sufficiently long to permit easy use of the drops, even with the quill stem at or near max insertion.
When I asked I suspected that the vintage bikes were taller, and it seems that you confirmed that.
 

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If you're looking for a bar with more reach, check out the Maes bend bars, they're nice and long. They have them at Grand Cru Course Handlebar- Classic Round Bend - Handlebars - Components for $60, $29 for Grand Cru Course Handlebar, Noir - Handlebars - Components.
Or https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/components/handlebars/maes-parallel-254-handlebars/ has them for $115-125. Compass also has them in 31.8 to fit modern stems.
Yeah I know bout those bars. but don;t like the deep drop with them. I think I have slightly more saddle-to-tops drop than I had as a young un, but can't abide being in the drops much, in middle age. So deep drops are a no go for sure
 

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Yeah I know bout those bars. but don;t like the deep drop with them. I think I have slightly more saddle-to-tops drop than I had as a young un, but can't abide being in the drops much, in middle age. So deep drops are a no go for sure
I know that it's considered sacrilege by many, but have you considered raising your bars? As I mentioned in an earlier post, I went from the 66's to the 64's on a couple of my bikes. I raised the bars a bit also, which enabled me to utilize the drops again.

The bike which I have the Maes bars on is a couple of centimeters taller than the others, allowing me to freely use the drops. I really think that it was worth it for me to run the bars higher for the freedom to use more of the bars, and that in conjunction with the added length of the Maes allows me 5 or 6 distinct positions on the bars, 7 if I was to use the tops.
 

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Both, Kerry! Ergonomics plus aerodynamics. :yesnod: New word. You heard it here first. :thumbsup:
I guess so, thanks to this crap voice to text feature on the phone.

That said, the ergonomics of the Kwing suits me perfectly.
 

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I guess so, thanks to this crap voice to text feature on the phone.

That said, the ergonomics of the Kwing suits me perfectly.
That's pretty funny! The sounds "ergo" or "aero" are really close!

Those K wings could work nicely on a carbon frame. They look real pretty.
 

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I know that it's considered sacrilege by many, but have you considered raising your bars? As I mentioned in an earlier post, I went from the 66's to the 64's on a couple of my bikes. I raised the bars a bit also, which enabled me to utilize the drops again.

The bike which I have the Maes bars on is a couple of centimeters taller than the others, allowing me to freely use the drops. I really think that it was worth it for me to run the bars higher for the freedom to use more of the bars, and that in conjunction with the added length of the Maes allows me 5 or 6 distinct positions on the bars, 7 if I was to use the tops.
I have tried flipping my 6 degree stem up, but then it makes the bike feel like a goofy recreational bike, with odd handling and not good ergonomics for climbing.

no I like my tops where they are, and am on the drops on tough descents and the occasional headwind, but that might be less than 5% of the time or less.

Reason I say I am looking for longer reach (and short drop) bars is cause I am tempted to try out that new suspension stem which only comes in max 120mm, and I need 140mm to feel right. So with the hoods out further using those special randonneur bars it might be OK for me.
 

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How much have you spent in search of the right handlebar?

two bikes worth.

i got lucky the second bike had cinelli 64-38 bars. all four keepers have those now. two of them have the old crest logo on the sleeve. none have their original anodization, unfortunately.
 

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When I restarted cycling some seven years ago I tried the 3T Ergosum (cheapest version) which was too long and deep, and Ergonova (most expensive version) which was too short in the drops. Then I tried the Deda RHM-bend Zero100 which I thought was perfect for a while. Then I decided to try FSA Compact, and bought the expensive K-Force version. Perfect in a different way, but I crashed it and brought out the Deda RHM again. My mind was made up and I bought another FSA Compact, but a cheaper single butted round top Al version. I love it with double bar tape.

How much is that?
 
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