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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to upgrade from my 20+year old steel frame Trek with a new CF bike, perhaps the Specialized Roubaix. I currently have a small rear rack to carry my jacket, lunch, energy bars etc. One problem with the CF bikes is you can't put a rack on back or use the carbon seat post to hold one of the racks that attaches to the seat post.

My question is how do others bring along enough supplies to last for a 75-100 mile ride? You can onlystuff so much in those jersey pockets!
 

· Weed
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eyefly said:
I'm looking to upgrade from my 20+year old steel frame Trek with a new CF bike, perhaps the Specialized Roubaix. I currently have a small rear rack to carry my jacket, lunch, energy bars etc. One problem with the CF bikes is you can't put a rack on back or use the carbon seat post to hold one of the racks that attaches to the seat post.

My question is how do others bring along enough supplies to last for a 75-100 mile ride? You can onlystuff so much in those jersey pockets!
You could just replace the carbon seatpost with an aluminum one that will support your rack. I really don't think you'd notice the difference between a carbon post and an aluminum one anyway. Or you could get one of the larger seat bags and put your stuff in that.
 

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Generally when i'm doing a longer ride i map out a route with a gas station or something on it so i dont need to lug my lunch around. If this isn't an option and you like the rear rack, i say get an aluminium seat post that's painted black and mount your rack to it. Tell you what though, I have an easton EC70 post on my CF bike, and if i was the bike rackin' type i'd have no worries about throwing something on there...especially if we're talking a jacket and a couple of sandwiches. It's a very sturdy post...if you're dead set on CF everything maybe look into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are the CF posts more marketing hype than anything, or is it a matter of the seat post reaches a point of diminishing returns that a fitness rider wouldn't notice but a higher milage serious rider would?
 

· Resident Dutchbag
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How much stuff do you NEED to pack for a ride? I can't imagine lugging so much gear around to actually need a rack.
 

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I had the same quandary with a full carbon-composite bike I had. I got a backpack to commute with, but that was not an optimum solution. Interstingly this is a common problem. You would think marketers would see the need and manufacturers would buid products that meet the needs.

I got a full-custom carbon bike set up as a commuter. The titanium drop outs are threaded for a rack and the top of the rack fits under the rear brake binder bolt. I put a rack trunk on the rack.

To answer the poster who wonders what reason there would be to carry so much stuff to need a trunk, look at audax biking. Look at commuting to work on a bike. Recreational riders are in a little universe and don't see the big picture. There are a lot of reasons a bike could be used instead of a car if it was more practicle. For example, there are rear panniers that will fit a standard shopping bag. It's a shame, we live in a culture that uses up oil at a prodigious rate, yet we have an avid cycling community that thinks they are doing a good thing by not using gas, but they are only riding recreationally or racing; doing nothing to practically reduce the use of gasoline.

For a lot of people a bike this would be better suitable for the kind of riding they want to be able to do: http://www.cyclestournesol.com/tlc.htm# This is just an example of a practical commuting bike that is not a tank that most people envision when you use the word, "commuting."
 

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Good points from Insight Driver.

I'm looking to upgrade from my 20+year old steel frame Trek with a new CF bike . . .
While a new CF bike is certainly a nicer bit of technology than your old Trek, it might not turn out to be the automatic "upgrade" you think you will be making. Insight Driver makes some very good points about how bikes are used in different ways by different riders. Judging from your question and reading between the lines of your post, I think you should give the ability to mount a rack more priority and the CF less. After the new wears off a sub-18 pound CF bike, carrying 5 pounds of stuff on your body will become a constant annoyance.
 

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eyefly said:
I'm looking to upgrade from my 20+year old steel frame Trek with a new CF bike, perhaps the Specialized Roubaix. I currently have a small rear rack to carry my jacket, lunch, energy bars etc. One problem with the CF bikes is you can't put a rack on back or use the carbon seat post to hold one of the racks that attaches to the seat post.

My question is how do others bring along enough supplies to last for a 75-100 mile ride? You can onlystuff so much in those jersey pockets!
Don't use a carbon seat post. I have a full-carbon Calfee frame with an aluminum seat-post. When I'm doing multi-day rides, I just attach one of these. Gives me plenty of room for jacket, lunch, camera, repair stuff, etc.

If it's just a one-day ride, I use this under-saddle bag. I can stuff a jacket, repair stuff and some cash in there, no problems. I stop at gas stations along the way if I need to replenish my supply of fig newtons.
 

· SoCal--S Beach to the Dam
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eyefly said:
I'm looking to upgrade from my 20+year old steel frame Trek with a new CF bike, perhaps the Specialized Roubaix. I currently have a small rear rack to carry my jacket, lunch, energy bars etc. One problem with the CF bikes is you can't put a rack on back or use the carbon seat post to hold one of the racks that attaches to the seat post.

My question is how do others bring along enough supplies to last for a 75-100 mile ride? You can onlystuff so much in those jersey pockets!
Saddlebag with my spare stuff and 2 bottles and a couple of bars. Leave the jacket,lunch and ect at home.
 

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It seems to me that you can get quite a bit of gear into a seat bag, if you have the right bag. A jacket can always go into a jersey pocket, and if you want to carry more gear without carrying a backpack, a good sized lumbar pack can hold quite a bit.

Of course, you can always replace your seatpost with an aluminum one--assuming that you can find something that fits, I would expect you to notice round about ... say, ZERO difference in ride quality or road speed.

I'd also question your suppositions about racks. Although most are a problem, some racks will mount to CF frames--it's really just a matter of the right attachments and some care in using them. Search the posts of this forum and you'll find, somewhere, a picture of a Colnago C40 with a touring rack built for road racing bikes. A solid CF seatpost should be able to tolerate a post rack too, if you are careful in mounting it--if a CF steerer tube can take the stress of high speed cornering with your weight pressing against the bars, a post ought to be able to take the stress of a lightly loaded rack.
 

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I have the Roubaix and have done a few long distance rides on it now so here are a few tricks:

- Don't put your spare tube(s) in the saddle bag, tape them to the inside of your frame
- Get a bento box or similar to store your energy gel
- Take two bottles of water and try to plan to have places you can stop to refill, if there is nowhere at all you can get refills then and only then should you take a camelbak (I only use one these days if I'm doing a long ride in the middle of the desert or somewhere away from civilization).
- Don't take your full wallet, just put your ID, health insurance card, credit/debit card and some cash in a little baggie and stash it in your saddle bag.
- Get a belt clip for your cell phone and clip it to the side of your shorts
- Get a lightweight windbreaker that can fold down so it easily fits in a jersey pocket or just use arm warmers

That should free up your jersey pockets for whatever else you want to take and plus leave extra room in your saddle bag, which I usually fill up with a little first aid kit just in case.
 

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Why would you need a rack's worth of stuff on a 75 to 100 mile ride though? Seems like overkill to the nth degree to me and I think it would be a shame to put a rack on something like a Roubaix just for centuries plus the extra weight wouldn't be welcome.

If you were touring or commuting on the bike it would be a different story but then you probably wouldn't be looking at a Roubaix for that. I think the CF seat post does make some difference as well if you ride on a lot of rough roads.
 

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eyefly My question is how do others bring along enough supplies to last for a 75-100 mile ride? You can onlystuff so much in those jersey pockets![/QUOTE said:
In my jersey pockets, and a small underseat bag.

You say 75-100 mile ride, so I presume you're talking long training rides / centuries, not touring or commuting, which are different as some have mentioned.
 
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