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If im leading a chase group with several riders behind me what is the right way to pull off and let someone else lead the chase (Im toast) so that we don't lose a lot of momentum. I know in a group ride you usually wiggle your elbow and pull off...but how do you do this in a race?
 

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If im leading a chase group with several riders behind me what is the right way to pull off and let someone else lead the chase (Im toast) so that we don't lose a lot of momentum. I know in a group ride you usually wiggle your elbow and pull off...but how do you do this in a race?
No different in a race. Just don't get so gassed you can't hang on. If you've taken a long pull and the chase is fairly close the guy on your wheel might decide its a good time to thin the herd.
 

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IME, successful breaks have happened using the TTT format: pull through the front, float back; pull through the front, float back; repeat. I usually will make a circle with my finger in the air to indicate the direction of rotation (clockwise or counter) just depending on wind.

In theory, a chase group should do the same format, but doesn't always work because of a lack of coordination, experience, and/or variation in engine sizes (it sucks when one guy tries to rip everyone else's legs off). But most times, when the chase group latches back on, most of us would get blown off again anyway at the next key section of race, because of our lack of engine size compared to lead groupers.

But in one race I did make the podium once chasing. About 6 of us chased after some tough hills to a lead group of mostly climber types (I remember mostly just sitting in during the chase, since I was totally gassed and trying to recover, and the other chasers were pretty motivated). Being with the climber types made the sprint much easier for me and other sprinter types who managed to latch on the lead group of 19 (out of 50 racers).
 

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I'm sure you know and of course it goes without saying, don't sit up, slow down, stop pedaling, or anything else until you've moved over and it's clear that you're no longer the front of the paceline and even then don't do it abruptly. It's best to do this well before your totally toasted.

Also, riders can miss a quick wiggle if their attention is elsewhere when you do it. I like to hold my elbow out for several seconds or wave it a couple of times to help ensure they see it.
 

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I'm sure you know and of course it goes without saying, don't sit up, slow down, stop pedaling, or anything else until you've moved over and it's clear that you're no longer the front of the paceline and even then don't do it abruptly. It's best to do this well before your totally toasted.

Also, riders can miss a quick wiggle if their attention is elsewhere when you do it. I like to hold my elbow out for several seconds or wave it a couple of times to help ensure they see it.
^^ This. Plus, when moving over to allow the next person in line to move up, do it slowly. I was pulling off of a paceline and wiggled my elbow several times. The guy behind me didn't see my multiple wiggles. When I moved over, it was a bit too fast and I took out his front wheel. This was a combination of my pulling off being too fast and him not paying attention (fatigue had set in).

Now, I always assume they don't see me and very gradually pull off.
 

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I'm sure you know and of course it goes without saying, don't sit up, slow down, stop pedaling, or anything else until you've moved over and it's clear that you're no longer the front of the paceline and even then don't do it abruptly. It's best to do this well before your totally toasted.
Well unless of course no one else will pull through. I have been in situations where no matter how I indicated I was done being on the front (moved over, arm flick etc) the guys behind me would not let me off the front (snaking around behind me no matter where I moved) at that point I just stop pedaling at all that usually ends that nonsense pretty fast.

I don't tend to use this tactic on the track tho.
 

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Well unless of course no one else will pull through. I have been in situations where no matter how I indicated I was done being on the front (moved over, arm flick etc) the guys behind me would not let me off the front (snaking around behind me no matter where I moved) at that point I just stop pedaling at all that usually ends that nonsense pretty fast.

I don't tend to use this tactic on the track tho.
SKID!!!!!!

made me lol
 

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Chases work best with rolling turns (assuming you are not racing for a team for which you are expected to work on the front etc).
You cannot assume those behind are interested to chase. They may have buddies in the break. Or they may be thinking to let the break go a bit longer, because lower grades tend to chace every little break down rather than let one get far enough away to deter others.
 
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