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Last year I rode my first century, with the benefit of a professional coach to helping me train. I'm doing another century in a couple weeks; no coach now. I seem to recall advice to keep my heart rate in a specific zone during the ride. Can someone help me out here?
 

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Most people keep their HRs in zone 2 for a century.
If you are nuts, or using the century as a training ride, you can aim for a combination of zones 3 & 4.
 

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I guess it all depends on what you are capable of and what you want out of it and the terrain.I have done sub 5 hours centuries solo and my average HR was almost 80% of my max.I have done them in the same time with friends and it was 65%.

It might be a lofty goal to keep your HR in the lower zones if you are doing this in the mountains unless you climb with ease and are really fit.
 

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I did a century last week, until 75 miles i thought i was going at a reasonable pace and then decided to back off with effort because i hadnt done any rides longer than 65 this year. When i finished my av. hr. was 81% max.
 

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I'm new to this, have now done 4 centuries over 18 months, first one 5hrs 57 and I tried to pace myself according to HR, most recent one I did in 4hrs 17 (faster flatter course) and didn't worry about my HR. I believe that HR monitors are better for training than using in the event - everything changes when you're in an event and for some odd reason you can usually maintain a much higher HR in an event than when training, and feel fine. My 2c, just do it, don't worry about your HR, you'll probably be very pleasantly surprised by what you can do...
 

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WingNut said:
I'm new to this, have now done 4 centuries over 18 months, first one 5hrs 57 and I tried to pace myself according to HR, most recent one I did in 4hrs 17 (faster flatter course) and didn't worry about my HR. I believe that HR monitors are better for training than using in the event - everything changes when you're in an event and for some odd reason you can usually maintain a much higher HR in an event than when training, and feel fine. My 2c, just do it, don't worry about your HR, you'll probably be very pleasantly surprised by what you can do...
Depending upon how new you are to this, as you say, thats very impressive. Nearly 23.5 mph average for a century? Your body is very pre-disspossed to cycling, you'll go far. And i agree with what Wingnut says, once your in a n event your be surprised how much quicker you can go, and how much easier it will feel.
 

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Last one I did had 5500' of climbing, was done in 4:50, and the avg HR was 165 - max is 200.

Being an ex old school racer I'm not all sold on the "zone' training deal - although I do agree that you need to train at different intensities for different purposes. I've just heard too many chumps talking about zone this, and zone that.
 

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I have commuted by bicycle for years, took up road cycling training in 2004. 4 centuries 2004 5hrs 57, 2005 5hrs 15, 2005 5hrs 02 and the 2006 4hrs 17 (Round Mt Taranaki, NZ), the last one was a perfect day, I got in a very quick bunch and just hung on, still can't believe it. Thought I was gonna end up as the next Lance or something so joined the club to start racing, but get my butt kicked regularly, there's always faster guys out there. Don't know if i'll ever repeat the 4hr17.
 

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WingNut said:
I have commuted by bicycle for years, took up road cycling training in 2004. 4 centuries 2004 5hrs 57, 2005 5hrs 15, 2005 5hrs 02 and the 2006 4hrs 17 (Round Mt Taranaki, NZ), the last one was a perfect day, I got in a very quick bunch and just hung on, still can't believe it. Thought I was gonna end up as the next Lance or something so joined the club to start racing, but get my butt kicked regularly, there's always faster guys out there. Don't know if i'll ever repeat the 4hr17.
I feel for you, thats the problem with cycling just when your really happy with a result and think your the next Lance Armstrong, the next Lance Armstrong comes along and kicks your butt.
 

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You guys really call centuries "events"? I call them long rides that I don't have to worry about food on. I agree, in a race you will be able to push your body way beyond what you thought you could but centuries are totally different. I've done 4-5 centuries for training and it seems 99.9% of those people take 7+ hrs to finish. I agree, if you want to feel like the next LA go ride a century. Racing is a completely different world. Once you have ridden enough you will know your body and your current fitness for that event and adjust accordingly.
 
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