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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Curious...

How many Roadies here use Hydration Packs?

(Camelbak, Dakine, etc...)

When I ride, I will use one instead of bottles (most likely a Camelbak Rogue)
for all the benefits they provide (carrying tools, tube(s), 1st Aid Kit, nutrition,
camera, flat kit, I.D., keys, wallet, etc...),
plus, a liter or two of water or sports drink.
 

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I use a camelbak, because I sweat a ton. It's the only way i can drink enough on long, hot rides. On really long rides, I have the 2 liter camelbak, and hammer perpetuem in the water bottle(s). I never used a camelbak in a race, though. Has anyone?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I'm hooked on Hydro Packs.

It's just so great to have everything you need in one place where I won't worry about it falling off or having to have several different storage options.

I love being able to "sip" water regularly replenishing myself as I need and not having to stop to do it.

I love being able to just pull over and whip out a snack out of my pack to eat
(apple, fruit, sandwich, etc...) then hitting the road again.

Granted, it ain't "slick" to have a hump on top of your back while riding and probably ain't aerodynamic (say probably because it's possible that air "might" ride over the pack due to the hole the helmet in front of it is punching through the air).

But the convenience is great.

And, I use my bikes to train and to get stronger so for me a 10-20lb
pack on my back is just more weight for me to have to work on my body.
 

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Used to use one when I did mountain bike megarides, but for everyday road rides I just carry a bottle or two. I never have liked riding with a pack, and this time of year I'm not usually far from home/convenience stores/gas stations.
 

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I use a Camelbak pouch in a NorthFace pack (The NF pouch broke). I keep my mini-pump in there and sometimes a lock in the straps on the back.

I live in the tropics and usually ride by myself either in the mountains or on long 4-6hr rides. I like to have water on me. When it is 95 degrees and humid the Camelbak is the nicest thing you can have.
 

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Anybody seen these yet? Saw a couple of TT guys at ToC wearing them under jersey's. Interesting to say the least.
 

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I'm hooked on Hydro Packs.
It's just so great to have everything you need in one place where I won't worry about it falling off or having to have several different storage options.

Close the zipper on your seat pack?

I love being able to "sip" water regularly replenishing myself as I need and not having to stop to do it.
You can learn to reach for a bottle without stopping.

I love being able to just pull over and whip out a snack out of my pack to eat
(apple, fruit, sandwich, etc...) then hitting the road again.

If you reach into your jersey pockets, you can keep riding and eat at the same time.

Granted, it ain't "slick" to have a hump on top of your back while riding and probably ain't aerodynamic (say probably because it's possible that air "might" ride over the pack due to the hole the helmet in front of it is punching through the air).
I don't think aerodynamics are a concern for many of us.

But the convenience is great.
Jersey pockets #2.

And, I use my bikes to train and to get stronger so for me a 10-20lb
pack on my back is just more weight for me to have to work on my body.

Go faster?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
rward325 said:
Anybody seen these yet? Saw a couple of TT guys at ToC wearing them under jersey's. Interesting to say the least.

I've seen them on Camelbak's site...their supposedly moister wicking material.

Looks like a good idea, but I can't imagine how it'd feel in 90 degree weather.

If I'm going to strap something on my body (especially that tight),
I'd like for it carry more than just water.

But the H20 pouch should help on keeping the core cooler.
And maybe the material stays cooler too.
Maybe it wraps the body in a cool blanket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
SeeBorough, you bring up good points that deserve a dedicated thread... :)

You can learn to reach for a bottle without stopping.
How many hours can you ride on 1 or 2 bottles?


If you reach into your jersey pockets, you can keep riding and eat at the same time.
I think that shirt pockets would be inconvenient for food storages cases that I use.
I'd look like I was smuggling tupperware.

:lol:


I don't think aerodynamics are a concern for many of us.
That's my "newb" assumption...that aerodynamics truimph a lot of convenience options that MTBers would utilize.




Jersey pockets #2.
Would Jersey Pockets carry the stuff that doesn't fit in the bags "on" the bike?

:confused:

When I ride, I like to ride for hours. I thought about outfitting a bike with frame and saddle mounted bags, a pump on the frame, two water bottles, stuffing a jersey with the rest of my personal needs, etc...but personally, I think that the bike should be as naked as possible with as little as possible on it.

Most I'd put on would be a computer...possibly lights if I were riding nights.

Which begs the question...just how many "things" does one need to ride for hours?

That all leads to personal preferences, but for me with the experience I've had in MTBing, I find that it's better to be prepared for events that never happen than to get caught up in something and "not" be prepared.

:)

Don't get me wrong...I'm all for the minimalist rider who has nothing on his/her bike but the clothes that they wear and a water bottle or two and a small bag under their seat. To each his/her own I always say. And if they ride without crashing, without mechanical failures, without getting flats...that's all great.

Me? I need at least a liter an hour of water. I'd go through a pair of bottles by my first hour and a half. I couldn't see myself riding all day without having what I need with me. A short ride for me is easily 2 hours.




Go faster?
I need the strength more than I need the speed right now (personally speaking).

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dajianshan said:
I use a Camelbak pouch in a NorthFace pack (The NF pouch broke). I keep my mini-pump in there and sometimes a lock in the straps on the back.

I live in the tropics and usually ride by myself either in the mountains or on long 4-6hr rides. I like to have water on me. When it is 95 degrees and humid the Camelbak is the nicest thing you can have.
Not only that, it's nice to have a pack on "if" one should fall. For MTB'rs, it's helped avoid injury.

[I have a place in Puerto Rico (tropics too)...I can't wait to ride the coast down there.
I'm going to try to make a loop around the island (about 270 miles).]
 

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-2 large bottles will get you through 3ish hours of hard riding in all but summer desert conditions. A third bottle carried in the center jersey pocket disappears, comfort wise, and that makes for 72 oz of water on board.
- Don't use food storage containers. It's just unneeded bulk and weignt no matter the carrying method. A bit of tinfoil or a zippy bag will carry anything you ought to be eating on a bike. If you are out for a picnic, different story. :)
-Squeezing the last bit of aero is important in a race, but matters not at all for training / JRA.
-Jersey pockets hold an amazing amount of stuff.
-Small seat pack holds tube, minitool, cell, and cash. Minipump under a bottle cage, food and water in the jersey pockets, and you're good to go for about as long as you can bear.

-Road riding has a different risk profile than being out in the boonies on an MTB. There's less to be prepared for, and far more options for solutions. A packful of crap just isn't needed. Wanting a nekkid bike is a fashion statement - nothing wrong with that. But in this neck of the societal woods, camelback is less fashionable than a bottle in a cage.

-And continue to remember, you aren't out in the boonies. I've never seen a ride where there hasn't been a way to replenish along the way, unless you are completely anti-social. Seldom too hard to find a gas station, but I've never hesitated to roll up a farmer's drive and ask for a bit of water. Met some terrific folk that way, heard about routes and sites I'd never have known about any other way, been invited for beers on the porch, lunch, gotten lines on the best farmstands, cheese, and furniture stores (gotta love riding in Amish country:) .)

Release your fears. Ride free.

BTW, I will ride with a camelback when doing a century for time. Good tool in that instance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
danl1 said:
-2 large bottles will get you through 3ish hours of hard riding in all but summer desert conditions. A third bottle carried in the center jersey pocket disappears, comfort wise, and that makes for 72 oz of water on board.
Not for me...I sweat a lot (and drink a lot).


- Don't use food storage containers. It's just unneeded bulk and weignt no matter the carrying method. A bit of tinfoil or a zippy bag will carry anything you ought to be eating on a bike. If you are out for a picnic, different story. :)
:lol: Again, not for me...I have a super high metabolism rate. I "have to" eat. I have to snack on something pretty much hourly when I'm doing something like exercising or working.


-Road riding has a different risk profile than being out in the boonies on an MTB. There's less to be prepared for, and far more options for solutions. A packful of crap just isn't needed.
Until you need it.


But yeah, I could see how there are different types of dangers.
For example, it'd be more likely for an MTBer to flip over their bike and
a roadie to crash at a much higher speed if say a car cuts him off or something.






Wanting a nekkid bike is a fashion statement - nothing wrong with that. But in this neck of the societal woods, camelback is less fashionable than a bottle in a cage.
For me (personally speaking), I like the bike to be as minimalist as possible with just the essentials (and everything else to be in "one" place).

Here's the pack I'd get for roading:



They also have this more aero H20 Pack, but doesn't have the same capacity (this might appeal more to the guys who don't like to carry as much as I do):







-And continue to remember, you aren't out in the boonies. I've never seen a ride where there hasn't been a way to replenish along the way, unless you are completely anti-social. Seldom too hard to find a gas station, but I've never hesitated to roll up a farmer's drive and ask for a bit of water.
I got you on that. :thumbsup:

What pack are you using?

I'm liking either the Rogue or the Slipstream (I have a M.U.L.E right now...a bit "too" much for RBing).

But, me? I don't get to ride as much as I want to, but when I do, I personally hate to stop for anything. What starts out as a spin around the block usually turns into a 2 or 3 hour excurstion.

:D

Where I live (suburbs of New York City), there's certainly no shortage of available pitstops...but most times, I prefer my own food to food I eat out. Besides convenience & the frugality benefits to it, there's also taste. For example, I like to prep chicken breast meat in chunks that are a nice hearty meal and easy to consume. I still have that MTB mentality in me. I don't like Granola Bars or light foods like that. I'd probably have to eat twice as much as the ordinary person. But hey, that's just me! :p




Release your fears. Ride free.

BTW, I will ride with a camelback when doing a century for time. Good tool in that instance.
I'm sure I'm going to ride with far less than what I ride with when I MTB.

"Release your fears. Ride free."

That sounds like a cool thing to put on your chainstays! :thumbsup:
 

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In my early mtb. days, I, too, carried a mid-sized hardware store around with me. Today? Tire, CO2, 2 bottles, maybe a bar/gel for long rides.

The rest is covered by a $20 in the back pocket.
 

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How many Roadies here use Hydration Packs?

Let me fix that for you.

How many Roadies here use sissy Hydration Packs?

Hydration Packs are fine for the mirror and 10 gallon seat bag crowd, but you won't see them much on real roadies. The were made for mountain bike people because a mud covered water-bottle tastes real bad. Specially if it has horse dung mixed in with the mud.
 

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Flat-out truths, that you may or may not choose to believe:

Jersey pockets will hold more stuff than either of those camelback models.

I sweat a lot, too, and tend to drink rather more than I should, but what I use is plenty. You can, too. Learn to hydrate well before you leave, then drink lightly but often while you ride. Learn to figure out how much you *should* be drinking, rather than how much you *want* to drink. It's relatively hard to drink too much for health, though hyponatremia is a real concern. But it's not at all hard to drink an amount that will hurt your performance.

As with hydration, you are likely mistaken about what your metabolism means for how much and what you should be eating. Yes, you likely do need to eat hourly, but you don't need (and probably don't really want) anything that requires 'food containers' or has significant bulk. There is a limit to the amount and type of food your body can efficiently process while exercising. Learn more about the types of foods appropriate for eating while riding, and most of your imagined problems with food carriage will disappear. Your performance will improve, too. And don't forget about gels, blocks, and energy drinks. Perhaps not as much fun to eat, but during exercise they are utilized far more effectively than 'real' food.

These things are true unless you are considerably (and I mean WAY) overweight. Then there's a different set of math controlling.

High speed crashes aren't all that more dangerous or damaging than low-speed ones. You fall the same distance either way, it's only a matter of how much skin gets scraped off. Road riding is much less likely to have a bike-stopping mechanical, and there's little on a roadie that a few minutes with a minitool won't get put right enough to continue. But most importantly, you are in the midst of civilization. There's just no need for the 'carry everything' ethos of MTB'ing.
 

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danl1 said:
BTW, I will ride with a camelback when doing a century for time. Good tool in that instance.
And I bet you still can't stand riding around with a rucksack for 5 hours!

Or 4. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
seeborough said:
In my early mtb. days, I, too, carried a mid-sized hardware store around with me. Today? Tire, CO2, 2 bottles, maybe a bar/gel for long rides.

The rest is covered by a $20 in the back pocket.
Yeah, I'm going to work on that SB.

I'm going to see how minimalist I can go.

If I can swing it by getting everything into 1 small under-saddle bag and a pair of bottles,
I'll be good.

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
danl1 said:
Flat-out truths, that you may or may not choose to believe:

Jersey pockets will hold more stuff than either of those camelback models.

I sweat a lot, too, and tend to drink rather more than I should, but what I use is plenty. You can, too. Learn to hydrate well before you leave, then drink lightly but often while you ride. Learn to figure out how much you *should* be drinking, rather than how much you *want* to drink. It's relatively hard to drink too much for health, though hyponatremia is a real concern. But it's not at all hard to drink an amount that will hurt your performance.

As with hydration, you are likely mistaken about what your metabolism means for how much and what you should be eating. Yes, you likely do need to eat hourly, but you don't need (and probably don't really want) anything that requires 'food containers' or has significant bulk. There is a limit to the amount and type of food your body can efficiently process while exercising. Learn more about the types of foods appropriate for eating while riding, and most of your imagined problems with food carriage will disappear. Your performance will improve, too. And don't forget about gels, blocks, and energy drinks. Perhaps not as much fun to eat, but during exercise they are utilized far more effectively than 'real' food.

These things are true unless you are considerably (and I mean WAY) overweight. Then there's a different set of math controlling.

High speed crashes aren't all that more dangerous or damaging than low-speed ones. You fall the same distance either way, it's only a matter of how much skin gets scraped off. Road riding is much less likely to have a bike-stopping mechanical, and there's little on a roadie that a few minutes with a minitool won't get put right enough to continue. But most importantly, you are in the midst of civilization. There's just no need for the 'carry everything' ethos of MTB'ing.

Hey Dan,

All good info. Thank you.

I like to eat natural food (except for Sports Beans).
I prefer to have fresh fruits on my rides (berries, apples, bananas, etc...).
And when I say I eat, I eat modestly (just enough to tame the hunger and to keep me fed with energy).
When I drink, I always have a Sports Drink before I ride and "sip" water throughout the ride as I feel my body calling it (being careful not to overhydrate myself).

I worked on roofs for 25+ years under some of the most extreme conditions with temperatures being an average of 30-40 degrees higher and more concentrated than on the ground (if it was 70 on the ground, it was over 100 on the roof and when it was 95 on the ground, it was even more of an oven up on the roof). So, I naturally came to master proper hydration for strenuous work (and biking is nothing compared to roofing).

When roofing, I'd eat at hourly or at 2 hour intervals snacking on something rather than having a meal of any sort (possibly eating something more substantial for lunch after a 4 hour period). My work was fast and hard. I climbed ladders all day, never stayed in one place for more than a minute or so and sometimes didn't stay still for hours. So, my body conditioned itself to that type of work enviroment. I found this to be extremely useful with biking. When I've ridden with experienced riders, they were surprised at my stamina and at my ability to keep up with them despite my limited "recent" riding experience.

And finally, if I can get it all in a bag and not have to carry anything on my person, then I might be able to uncluth my H20 pack.

If I can't? Then I just can't.

I'll pick up a nice small Roadie Pack and ride with what I need. I'd like to be able to ride "bare back" (pun intended! :lol: ),
but I'll end up doing what's best for me.

Again, thanks for the info. :thumbsup:
 
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