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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
I want to get away with my Aluminium Cyclocrosser and want to build a Titanium Cyclocrosser.
But my budget is not endless and I would like to "save a bite" for later.
What ar your titanium Cyclocrossers?
Why have you choosen this one? Any Pics?
And do you have any recommendation for "budget" titanium crossers?

Thanks
Oliver
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I am willing to spend some money, but the price-value should be allright, I am aware that cheap titanium is not availble/ or has some limitations.
But on the other hand I am not willing to pay an extra fee just for the "name" of the brand and less of the craftmanship of the work, you know what I mean?
For example I am questioning the price-value ratio of Litespeed/ Merlin..:aureola:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What steel recommandation do you have?
Would that be Salsa LaCruz? Or other? Is the Salso stiff enough for a heavy rider with their disc brake mount? I heard different messages, from stiff enough, too to much flex if you pedal to hard (disc brake is making noises)...
Thanks
 

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I have a habenero cross frame with stock 59 (really like a 61) geometry and I had them upsize the downtube for more stiffness. The bike rides nicely and is plenty stiff but probably weighs a most of a pound more than a high end Al bike. the quality on the frame is excellent and Mark the company owner was great to work with. Even with the upcharge for the tubing switch the frame was still under 1K. I like the bike and it makes a great rain bike for road training after cross season is over, but have to say if i was doing it over for a pure race bike I would save some money and buy a kona or salsa scandium/al frame with a carbon fork for less money and end up with a lighter bike. What exactly are you trying to get by going ti?
 

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I think the operative words used by g-Bike regarding steel were: "High end Custom". He/she is talking about a frame made to order to your fit needs by more than likely a boutique shop, such as Hunter, Steelman, Sachs, etc. etc.
 

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You call that running?
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Disc brakes are likely to rub a bit on bikes made of any frame material. Disc brake rotors are easy to bend slightly out of true and the pads need to be very close to the rim to function. This is the nature of currently available disc brakes.
 

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Number 2 on the course.
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The Sundance Kid said:
"The Pro-Cross is made expressly for the discipline of Cyclo-Cross racing."

"135mm rear spacing accommodates a broad selection of rear hub and gearing options."

Nothing says pro like MTB/hybrid hub spacing on a $2K frame.
They must be referring to the speed holes in the DT and ST. . .

Still not quite up to the standard set by Chris Kelly's take on cranks (he was also a 135mm guy). Not to pile on poor Chris, but the line about being free to do what you want and being successful not always going hand in hand is particularly poignant:

http://www.kellybike.com/order_techquestions.html said:
. . .
Can I run road cranks on the Knobby X?
I suppose this is a free country and people are free to do what they want (for the most part). However, being free to do what you want and being successful don’t always go hand in hand.

The real question is: why would you want to use road cranks?

* Is it because you wish to be over geared all the time and not have fun?
* Is it because you want a poor chain line?
* Is it because you want a gear and crank set that has less strength and durability?
* Is it because you think road cranks will weigh less?
* Is it because you think mountain cranks will make you slower?
* Is it because you enjoy spending more time, money and grief and are the type of person who always has to figure out things the hard way?
* Is it because you only wish to do road rides on your Knobby X and never want to ride it off road?
* Is it because your friends who don’t know any better told you to do it?
* All the above?

The Knobby X “Builders Choice™” specified group is the recipe for success. Whether you are piecing the bike together yourself or buying it complete from us -- save yourself (and us) a whole bunch of time, trouble and grief (that’s right – grief).

All you have to do is use our well thought out spec sheet for building a turn-key -- race winning Cross bike that will give you years and years of trouble free enjoyment.

In other words, if you want to –

* Always have the right gear for the right situation -- whether it’s racing or recreational riding.
* Never worry if your gearing can handle harsh off road abuse.
* Enjoy many miles of being able to ride just about anywhere.
* Never worry about riding the bike as hard as you can.

Then stick within the guidelines set forth in the builder’s choice spec sheet. Knobby X is one of the easiest bikes to build yet one that is most often goofed up by a wrong spec. We don’t recommend anything but the Builder’s Choice spec.
Any questions?
 

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The Sundance Kid said:
"The Pro-Cross is made expressly for the discipline of Cyclo-Cross racing."

"135mm rear spacing accommodates a broad selection of rear hub and gearing options."

Nothing says pro like MTB/hybrid hub spacing on a $2K frame.
Ha, I thought that to be odd as well. But then I thought it to be better, wider hub flange stronger wheel build. Yes?
 
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