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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it finally happened. I rode in the rain and I will confess, its was not THAT bad.

I rode to work knowing there was a chance for rain in the afternoon. Well, 2 storm cells moved through right around the time I was about to leave with the bigger one trailing. I decided the window of opportunity was to thread through the 2 storms. 1/3rd of the route was still pretty dry with a light drizzle. The remainder of the trip was a pretty steady rain.

In short, it felt kinda nice (its also been pushing 100 degrees for the past 2 weeks). I also made it home 4 minutes faster than usual.

I guess I need some fenders... :)
 

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I like riding in the rain... as long as it's gentle.

I've been hailed upon, snowed and icy rained upon - that sucks. Ice buildup forming on my brake cables.

Be sure to turn the bike upside down when cleaning it after a rain ride to drain the bottom bracket. I always have water in bottom bracket area after a rain ride. It's amazing how much water collects in there. water pours out of the small holes in the aft end of the chainstays
 

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A light to medium rain is fine to ride in as long as it's not cold. Cold + Rain = TehSuck.

Hard/Heavy rain that makes it impossible to see sucks too. Fortunately those kinds of rain are usually short and you can wait them out.
 

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I'm totally fine with rain as long as it's fairly warm out. Been stuck in a few torrential downpours where it was hard to see anything and water was up over my deep wheels. Didn't bother me in the least, feels pretty good actually.

And then there was the 2013 NY Gran Fondo. My friends and I went out ready for 70* weather and it was below 60* and rained the entire route. There were a few bouts of uncontrollable shaking, not a good feel when descending mountain switchbacks on wet roads. I think we were borderline hypothermic at the end, it was absolutely miserable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Be sure to turn the bike upside down when cleaning it after a rain ride to drain the bottom bracket. I always have water in bottom bracket area after a rain ride. It's amazing how much water collects in there. water pours out of the small holes in the aft end of the chainstays
Good advice, didn't even think about that. I'm overdue for a thorough bike cleaning anyways. Guess I know what I am doing this weekend.
 

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Rain rides in the summer are awesome! Did one last year, at night, and I was amazed how much of a big deal it was NOT. Just lots of fun.

What sucked was my partly-suede shoes getting drenched, and washing the road grit off the panniers etc. I'd do it more often if I weren't concerned about ruining everything.

Luckily we have a dehumidifier in the basement, often has bike stuff in front of it!
 

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A light to medium rain is fine to ride in as long as it's not cold. Cold + Rain = TehSuck.

Hard/Heavy rain that makes it impossible to see sucks too. Fortunately those kinds of rain are usually short and you can wait them out.
+1
a warm summer rain is nice. winter rain, not so much.
 

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Rain rides in the summer are awesome! Did one last year, at night, and I was amazed how much of a big deal it was NOT. Just lots of fun.

What sucked was my partly-suede shoes getting drenched, and washing the road grit off the panniers etc. I'd do it more often if I weren't concerned about ruining everything.

Luckily we have a dehumidifier in the basement, often has bike stuff in front of it!
Keeping my feet dry is the biggest deal in riding in the rain. I try to not let the weather dictate whether or not I'll ride (with the exception of ice and or really bad visibility). I picked up a pair of VeloToze, which are basically a thick swim cap type bootie, with no seams. So far, so good. Worth the $15 or whatever they cost.
 

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There's rain and there's rain

I got caught in a thunderstorm in Florida and it wasn't bad. It was hot before it rained and it was hot when it was raining. The only difference was that I couldn't see anything when it was raining.

But I got rained on a lot in New Zealand and it was very unpleasant. Cold and miserable. And long-lasting. So I don't find water all that terrible but I got a major beef against cold water coming out of the sky.
 

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I live in Seattle and ride year round. I agree with others - riding in the summer rain - awesome. Riding in the winter rain - suckfest. However, the biggest way to make it NOT a suckfest is to be properly outfitted. Good shoe covers, rain resistant tights, and a rain jacket.

On another note - I ride without fenders too. That means, if I ride with a group, I'm on the back. I personally never mind being behind someone without fenders. I do mind getting a soggy butt, so I often use an a$$-saver.

Just watch out for railroad tracks and bridge expansion joints. Those be-otches get mighty slippery. I've had 2 nasty wrecks due to tracks. No matter how confident you are, or how good you are at bike handling, you're not better than a wet railroad track. Bunny hop it or dismount.
 

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Yeh, watch your speed. A couple of years ago I got caught in a summer rainstorm. Decided I had to hurry up and get back. I don't really know why, since I was already soaked. Moving way too fast for the conditions, I turned off the trail onto a wooden bridge. The next thing I know, I am slamming my head on the ground. I never realized I was falling. Just one moment riding along and the next BAM. Blew out my rear tire as well. Not really hurt, fortunately, just some bruises.
 

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I live in Seattle and ride year round. I agree with others - riding in the summer rain - awesome. Riding in the winter rain - suckfest. However, the biggest way to make it NOT a suckfest is to be properly outfitted. Good shoe covers, rain resistant tights, and a rain jacket.
The problem with all that stuff is.. it's just too much stuff... stuff to keep clean, and dry, and ready.. you have to carry it in case you might need it. It kinda saps the fun out of the bike riding experience.

Just watch out for railroad tracks and bridge expansion joints. Those be-otches get mighty slippery. I've had 2 nasty wrecks due to tracks. No matter how confident you are, or how good you are at bike handling, you're not better than a wet railroad track. Bunny hop it or dismount.
Don't forget wooden bridges. Those suck when they are wet too. Many of the MUT's have them, and lots of them out in the woods covering creeks etc...
 

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The problem with all that stuff is.. it's just too much stuff... stuff to keep clean, and dry, and ready.. you have to carry it in case you might need it. It kinda saps the fun out of the bike riding experience.
Never had a problem with that. If I ride out in the morning (say for a commute) and it's not raining, I throw it in a backpack. If it is raining, I hang it up to dry when I get to work. Then, when I get home, toss it all in the wash on gentle and hang to dry. Easy as pie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Don't forget wooden bridges. Those suck when they are wet too. Many of the MUT's have them, and lots of them out in the woods covering creeks etc...
Also underpasses. I was crossing under one once after it had stopped raining for a few days, but there was still some water draining into the underpass, I had slowed down and unclipped just in case, good thing as there was just enough algae that my rear wheel broke loose. I was able to skid to a stop without getting injured but the rear wheel hit the metal grate HARD.
 
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