Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have lots of experience patching MTB tubes, more than 15 years, and i have used succesfully MTB tubes with over 10 patches on them.
I had a flat last week on my road bike i took the tube off and i cleaned the area of the puncture, it was a little hole in the center of the tube. I sanded it and i applied the cement i use on my mtb tube i let it dry and i applied the patch, it stucked succcesfully but one of the corners wouldnt get glued correctly so as i inflated teh tube it allowed air to leak and/ or it would come off.
I had nothing to do so i worked on the tube for a while and after over 5 tries the patch always ended coming off.
what am i doing wrong?
Maybe its so stupid as you shouldnt be inflating the tube outside the tire to check on your patch kind of answer but i would apreciate any help on this matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Viva Mexico! said:
I have lots of experience patching MTB tubes, more than 15 years, and i have used succesfully MTB tubes with over 10 patches on them.
I had a flat last week on my road bike i took the tube off and i cleaned the area of the puncture, it was a little hole in the center of the tube. I sanded it and i applied the cement i use on my mtb tube i let it dry and i applied the patch, it stucked succcesfully but one of the corners wouldnt get glued correctly so as i inflated teh tube it allowed air to leak and/ or it would come off.
I had nothing to do so i worked on the tube for a while and after over 5 tries the patch always ended coming off.
what am i doing wrong?
Maybe its so stupid as you shouldnt be inflating the tube outside the tire to check on your patch kind of answer but i would apreciate any help on this matter.
Using glue. Get one of the patch kits where the cement has already been applied to the patch. Those work much better.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,360 Posts
Got to disagree about those patches--I hate 'em

JJCole said:
Using glue. Get one of the patch kits where the cement has already been applied to the patch. Those work much better.
I've tried a couple of different brands of so-called "glueless" patches, and my failure rate on road tires is at least 50 percent. Even friends who use them consider them a temporary fix, to be replaced with a "real" patch when they get home (which more than cancels the minute you wait for glue to dry).
If you're inflating the tube more than just enough to make it hold its shape while you stuff it in the tire, that may be the problem. Think of the sandpaper as a cleaning agent, not a serious abrasive--you just have to scuff the rubber enough to get the dirt and mold-release stuff off it. Then put on a THIN layer of cement, let it dry until it's not shiny, DO NOT touch the glue or the sticky side of the patch with your finger, and press the patch down over the hole. Then put the tube against something hard and rub the patch down with something else hard, like the little rounded end of the lever, paying special attention to the edges. Blow it up by mouth just enough so it keeps its shape--you don't need more pressure than that--and put it back in the tire. I've been doing it that way for more than 30 years, probably 150-200 patches, and I can remember only one failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,504 Posts
A couple of things wrong

First, Cory pretty much covered it, but I would add a couple of things. First and foremost is that you should be carrying a spare tube. The side of the road, particularly on hot, humid days, in dusty locations, if it's raining, etc. is a poor place to be patching tubes. Second, when you are back home and patching that tube, make sure that your "glue spot" extends well beyond the area that the patch will cover, so as to make sure that the edges of the patch are held down well. Other than that, follow Cory's advice.
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,979 Posts
I'm not a spend-thrift, but personally, I never patch tubes. I throw them out & put on a new one. Road tubes can be had for $2-4. That's cheap enough for me to have peace of mind. A patch is defined as a temporary repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
With patches you have to glue on, you're supposed to put a small amount of glue on both the patch and the tube. You let both dry, then apply them. Don't inflate the tube until you have it fully mounted inside the tire. Once a tube is patched it should last the life of the tire. Even the glueless patches last me through a couple flats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys i think that he just nailed it:
"If you're inflating the tube more than just enough to make it hold its shape while you stuff it in the tire, that may be the problem"
But all your recomendations are correct, i always carry a spare tube, but it felt weird to dispose of a single hole tube when in mtb i patch tubes over 10 times without any problem.
Well not anymore since i went tubeless... i cant wait for road tires to become tubeless too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,504 Posts
Old debate

Mr. Versatile said:
I'm not a spend-thrift, but personally, I never patch tubes. I throw them out & put on a new one. Road tubes can be had for $2-4. That's cheap enough for me to have peace of mind. A patch is defined as a temporary repair.
Some of us would disagree strongly. I would say that in the last 100K miles, between my wife and I we have had approximately 2 patch failures. Between our two bikes right now, I wouldn't be surprised if there were 10 patches on the 4 inner tubes. I do not see a patch as a temporary fix unless you are using bad patches/have poor technique. YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,504 Posts
That would be . . . wrong

srf said:
With patches you have to glue on, you're supposed to put a small amount of glue on both the patch and the tube.
This is simply not correct. A proper patch comes with aluminum or plastic covering the "sticky" face, and there is absolutely no need to apply glue to that surface before putting the patch on the tube. Full stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Kerry Irons said:
This is simply not correct. A proper patch comes with aluminum or plastic covering the "sticky" face, and there is absolutely no need to apply glue to that surface before putting the patch on the tube. Full stop.
I wouldn't say that is true for every patch kit out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Kerry Irons said:
Some of us would disagree strongly. I would say that in the last 100K miles, between my wife and I we have had approximately 2 patch failures. Between our two bikes right now, I wouldn't be surprised if there were 10 patches on the 4 inner tubes. I do not see a patch as a temporary fix unless you are using bad patches/have poor technique. YMMV
Same here. I could probably count on one hand the number of bad patch jobs I've done in the 11 years I've been riding.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top