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Frog Whisperer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put a new chain on my Bianchi (record c-9). I showed NO sign of elongation with a ruler OR gauge (parks) BUT the lateral play was excessive. I rode it today and sure enough the smallest two cogs, have skip...on all 3 rings.....damnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn!
OK, since I am sharing wheels with my new build I ordered a new cassette and ANOTHER new chain.

Even though I am anal about chain cleaning and lube...

I have 2 years and maybe 6000 miles on the cassette and chain, so I don't feel TOOOOOO bad, but..

For reference a chain can be WAY worn out before it shows ANY measurable elongation!

another hundred bucks..........
 

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Old man, telling stories.

Just as a bit of levity: long ago when no one had much money for bike stuff, this was the standard advice for people whose new chain skipped in certain cogs: avoid those cogs until the new chain gets some wear on it. Once it does, no more skips on those cogs. Doesn't play today, LOL :D
 

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brand???

This can definitely happen with a Campy chain. I posted my results a couple of years ago. A Campy 10 chain with 6,000 miles on it showed almost no elongation, measured with a precision 12" scale, but when I changed to a new chain, I got chain skip on the 19T cog.

Further measuring showed that the roller spacing had increased from .200 inch to .235-.240 and the side clearance had nearly doubled. The chain was shot, despite the small amount of elongation. This contradicts the writings of "experts" who claim that elongation is the only dimension that requires measuring. Measuring elongation (only) works for most chain brands, but not Campy.

What I figured out is that you need to alternate the use of 2-3 chains to avoid chain skip. I can put a slightly used chain on that worn cassette and it will not skip, so I still use it.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
C-40....it is indeed a campy C-9 and in fact I could ALMOST roll the damn thing up sideways! (exaggerating BUT........)
I may order a 3rd chain in a couple of weeks but right now I am pretty much tapped out trying to build up my new frame. As it is I am using ALMOST all old "take off parts"

Wim, that is EXACTLY what I am doing and would just put the old chain BACK on except for the sharing wheels issue..
 

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not surprised....

I found the side clearance on my chain to be about .013 inch after 6,000 miles, which is close to twice the new clearance.

It just goes to show you that most people are used to Shimano chains that elongate at least four times faster. In that case, you can use a scale to see if the chain is worn out.

I've found that a chain with even a few hundred miles of use is not likely to skip, where a new one will.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the ONLY chain I have that really does not belong in the recycling bin has 18 miles on it...LOL

tell me, how do you measure "side clearance"? I do have a digital caliper I use for my work.

I ended up ordering both from Lickbike, it was easier and was almost the same price as paying 2 sets of shipping.

I am still waiting for my braze-on front for my Trek but that has my OLD chain on it so it won't skip....SO....what I should have done was ordered a set of wheels (tape, tubes. tires) for that and just used the old stuff for now....LOL....yeah that would have been the cheap way to go....
 

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Changing riding style

Touch0Gray said:
I put a new chain on my Bianchi (record c-9). I showed NO sign of elongation with a ruler OR gauge (parks) BUT the lateral play was excessive. I rode it today and sure enough the smallest two cogs, have skip...on all 3 rings.
It sounds like you spend a lot of time in a smaller chainring than you should if you want to reduce cog wear. If you ride in the larger chainring and therefore larger cassette cogs, you'll reduce cassette wear, chain wear, and chainring wear. It's a win-win-win.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Kerry Irons said:
It sounds like you spend a lot of time in a smaller chainring than you should if you want to reduce cog wear. If you ride in the larger chainring and therefore larger cassette cogs, you'll reduce cassette wear, chain wear, and chainring wear. It's a win-win-win.
You know what, you are right on that call...I do tend to run the 42 rather than the 52, (campy 9 speed triple) I rarely use the 30 but tend to mash up light grades in the 42/13 or 42/14 too. Thanks for the tip I will try to remember that.... I am building up the new one with a double so it should help.
 
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