Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes, I admit it, the only reason I'm thinking of getting an additional high end bike is because of bike lust. I have a 2008 Cervelo RS with Dura Ace and DT Swiss RR1450 wheels and it is a fantastic bike. Then again, I only started riding last July at age 52, so other than 2 weeks on a Soloist Team, and a Scott CX Team Cross Bike as my winter bike, I have no experience with others. I am overweight right now (190 lbs at 5'10") and trying to get fit again.

A lot of the guys at my LBS ride Cervelo R3.

I ride between 50-65K per day on weekends, and 25-30K or so on weekdays when weather permits. I don't see myself racing. I want to do some metric and imperial centuries and signed up for a metric one here in April.

LBS has suggested the Colnago C50, the guy who suggested it is a good rider and he has a Kuota KOM (I thought my RS was light, but the KOM, wow) Colnago EPS was also mentioned, but I think thats more for racers (sprinters) Is that correct?

I want a bike that is fast, light and comfortable. The RS for the most part does fit that part.

So, your comments and suggestions are most welcome.

Thanks from Vancouver. BC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
A bike is tool. Ask yourself, what is it that I want a new bike to do for me that my current one is not? If you can answer that, then you have a logical reason to buy a new one. If you can't, then you are buying on emotion, and you will never be satisfied with whatever you buy. Of course, I can't follow my own advice half the time.

brewster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thats why i stated up front that its a matter of bike lust and not a matter of need. Think of it this way, if someone gave you $15,000.00 to buy a bike, what would you do, even if you already had a really good bike that you loved.

brewster said:
A bike is tool. Ask yourself, what is it that I want a new bike to do for me that my current one is not? If you can answer that, then you have a logical reason to buy a new one. If you can't, then you are buying on emotion, and you will never be satisfied with whatever you buy. Of course, I can't follow my own advice half the time.

brewster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
The RS is already plenty sexy; it's basically an R3 with a taller headtube and longer chainstays, right?. I vote that you upgrade your hoops. That did a lot to quench my recent attack of bike lust.

I went from a set of Topoline C19's (1420g actual) to the 2009 Reynolds DV46T UL's (1080g actual). The deep-ish carbon rims added lots of appeal to my ride, and the performance & comfort both took significant jumps upwards.

If you're not into sew-ups, I know Reynolds has the DV46C UL (1405 g claimed) for clincher users. That'd trick your bike's looks out, lower the weight, and likely increase comfort (carbon's muting characteristics). I know lots of people look at wheels built using Edge rims, too.

My braking is fine, and if you're hesitant to use them in poor conditions, that's why you keep the DT Swiss set.

The nice thing about pimp wheels is that you can easily carry them over to your next bike.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats a good idea. Only thing is, with wheels like that, people expect me to be fast and strong. It doesn't look very good to be laboring up the hill with fancy wheels like those. :)

Which EDGE wheels are recommended?

Thanks
{/QUOTE}

If you're not into sew-ups, I know Reynolds has the DV46C UL (1405 g claimed) for clincher users. That'd trick your bike's looks out, lower the weight, and likely increase comfort (carbon's muting characteristics). I know lots of people look at wheels built using Edge rims, too.

Hope this helps.[/QUOTE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Man, if you get on a C50, people will expect you to be fast and strong, AND they'll wonder why you aren't spinning on carbon rims.

Embrace that fact that you're a poser with a good budget to work with. That's what I do. Of course, if the stakes are high, just tell people that you're on a recovery ride.

Bam. Bases covered.

I'm not at all studied up on the offerings from Edge Composites. I just see them spoken of highly on the forums here.

I went as far as deciding to go with Reynolds over Zipps, and I left it at that. No offense to Zipp owners! I have several shop buddies that swear by Zipp. It's that for my desired rim depth, I found the weight and my personal aesthetic preferences pushing me towards Reynolds. Apparently, I'm not a dimples kinda guy.
 

·
eminence grease
Joined
·
18,538 Posts
If I was suffering from lust I'd pick up the phone and call one of the builders on my short list and then start thinking about paint jobs. Nothing better for lust than to commission something that makes you wait a while before getting it.

Or I'd start haunting eBay looking for a frame to build.
 
G

·
If I were in VAncouver, and suffering from bike lust I would exactly as Terry suggested above, but - being in Vancouver - I would call Sam Whittingham on Quadra Island and get him to build you a new "for life" dream bike.

There are lots of Colnagos and Treks and ...............

You will have just another of them.

But if you get a custom, it will be the only one and it will be yours.

I was at a sponsored event last fall and came across two guys at one the pee stops. One had a Colnago ( I was told later ), the other had a sweet Indy Fab custom. The only one of the two bikes I saw was the Indy Fab.

Decide what you want the bike to do, then order it from a good builder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
cervelo-van said:
Thats a good idea. Only thing is, with wheels like that, people expect me to be fast and strong. It doesn't look very good to be laboring up the hill with fancy wheels like those. :)
It's not like Colnago is a name people won't recognize. Some people may see the Colnago logo on your frame and expect you to be fast and strong. One option if you want to avoid those expectations is to spend the money and get a coach. You avoid the expectations and you will get faster.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
976 Posts
Depends where you live. . .

Moon said:
Man, if you get on a C50, people will expect you to be fast and strong, AND they'll wonder why you aren't spinning on carbon rims.
Where I live you see Nagos all the time, so It's not big deal. Generally affluent people are riding highend bikes (and cars) and therefore don't have the time to commit to being a fake racer. IMO, only paid pros are actually "racers," as anyone can race at an amateur level. So to the OP, buy whatever you want as that what makes the world go round. You will hear too much of that working class hero crap on these forums to get a real answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,372 Posts
My thoughts: When I see bikes like Colnago, its nice but not exclusive. It is more the name image depending who is riding it. Kind of like a trophy bike taken out for the nice weather weekend rides.

I concur with toomany...a custom in my eyes says classy and discerning rider. There is a group at one of the coffee stops that have Moots, Seven, Indy, Calfee...I lust after those. When I get 50+, a custom is what I would like. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks all, I think I will go for the nice wheels (Either the Renoylds or EDGE 45) at this time. I already bought 3 bikes in the past 7 months( though I sold one) so the new bike (and it might just be a Parlee Z1 or Z4) will wait for next year.

Those of you who use these kind of expensive wheels, do you use them for everyday rides?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
wheels:

Build up some edge 45's tubs with DT190's or DT240's and DT Aerolites for a bombproof , light, reliable wheelset.

Frame:

Go custom - Crumpton would be my carbon pick for the price/service. Baum here in Melbourne make beautiful steel and Ti bikes and if your based in the US - probably for a steal with the current exchange rate!

If factory built - A C-50 would be a really nice ride - not as stiff as your RS though.
and look at a Time VXRS. Beautiful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
QQUIKM3 said:
Generally affluent people are riding highend bikes (and cars) and therefore don't have the time to commit to being a fake racer. IMO, only paid pros are actually "racers," as anyone can race at an amateur level.
I disagree with this wholeheartedly. While it may be debatable whether someone who does one criterium a year is actually a racer or not, I think that most people will agree that a category one rider is actually a racer. As someone who has done a limited amount of racing, I have a great deal of respect for the people who manage to hold down a regular job and compete at that level.

I also find the comment about affluent people somewhat curious. I find that there are plenty of affluent people who manage to find time and be what you might term "fake golfers" or the like. You also seem to indicate that people don't have time to race because they own these high end bikes and cars, which does not seem logically sound.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top