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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
but - do Dura Ace brake pads/holders fit Campy Skeleton brakes? I want to swap between alumn and carbon wheels, and fighting the campy pads out of the holders is a PITA, and I don't want to replace the pad and holder each time.
 

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Fast No More.
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I think Kool Stop's Zipp pads have been OK'd to use on both materials interchangeably. They come in both Shimano and Campy flavors.

Don't know if you could swap DA pads onto campy arms - I'm guessing if the slots are the same width, you should be golden.
 

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Campy holders for campy brakes. Three options: swap the pads between wheels, buy another set of holders for your carbon pads, or buy a set of Centaur brakes for your carbon pads and swap out the brakes when you use your carbon wheels.

I use option three since the brake track is slightly higher for my carbon wheels plus I don't have to mess with brake toe-in. It takes me about five minutes to swap out the brakes. My spare brakes are old dual pivot chorus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
bigbill said:
Campy holders for campy brakes. Three options: swap the pads between wheels, buy another set of holders for your carbon pads, or buy a set of Centaur brakes for your carbon pads and swap out the brakes when you use your carbon wheels.

I use option three since the brake track is slightly higher for my carbon wheels plus I don't have to mess with brake toe-in. It takes me about five minutes to swap out the brakes. My spare brakes are old dual pivot chorus.
That's why I'm wondering if Shimano holders/pads will work. (except for the brake track issue).

I don't know why Campagnolo followed up such a smart brake quick release with such a goofy pad changing system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Let me ask a different way.

Are there any physical limitations (depth, fixing bolt size, etc) that would prohibit me from using a set of Shimano brake holders on my Chorus Skeleton Brakes?
I'm afraid of knocking teeth out or an eye trying to pull the pads out of the holders.
The Shimano design is superior here, IMHO
 

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Use a vice to pull the pads out of the holders. It makes it really easy. In the alternative, buy a set of Jagwire brake pad holders, pads usually included, and replace them with the carbon pads. Then, just swap the pad holders when you need to.

Me, I just have bikes that are carbon wheel only, and others that are metal wheel only. I just got too tired of swapping pads every time I changed wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks - I'll look up the jagwire holders

It's one of those things where if I'm taking the brakes off, or pulling the holders out to replace the pads, it seems like it defeats the purpose of a replaceable pad.
 

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It depends on what your definition of the purpose of replaceable pads is. Personally, I think their replaceability is for when they wear out, which isn't once a week like swapping out wheels. Chainrings, cassettes, and chains are replaceable, but they do take a little bit of time to replace. Just like replacing pads on the brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
fabsroman said:
It depends on what your definition of the purpose of replaceable pads is. Personally, I think their replaceability is for when they wear out, which isn't once a week like swapping out wheels. Chainrings, cassettes, and chains are replaceable, but they do take a little bit of time to replace. Just like replacing pads on the brakes.
I want to be able to swap between a carbon and alum wheelset quickly, and w/o having to adjust the shoe, if possible.
Nothing easy about swapping out campy pads, and besides, do the black campy pads ever wear out?
 

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Depends on how much you ride and how often you use your brakes. I've got over 4,000 miles on one set of black Campy pads and it doesn't even look like they have worn. On the other hand, my Zipp pads show wear right after the brakes are applied for the first time.

I too wish I could swap wheels on the bikes without having to deal with the pads. That is why I have one bike for training and a couple others for racing.
 

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millerinva said:
Are there any physical limitations (depth, fixing bolt size, etc) that would prohibit me from using a set of Shimano brake holders on my Chorus Skeleton Brakes?
I'm afraid of knocking teeth out or an eye trying to pull the pads out of the holders.
The Shimano design is superior here, IMHO
I'll start by commenting on your comment on the Shimano design being superior. I removed a wheel on my commuter bike that has Shimano pads and holders but the brakes have no quick releases. I pushed the wheel on to the frame through the pads and one of the pads popped out without much effort. So much for the Shimano design being superior. Luckily, they were easy enough to put back on.

Campy pads are installed on the holders through a tight dovetail interference fit. Shimano pads have a slot on either side that the pads slide on through with a setscrew to prevent the pads from sliding off. Can Shimano pads be used on Campy holders (or vice versa)? I absolutely would not recommend it for safety reasons, though they could be forced on to the wrong holders. Don't do it!

To get the Campy pads off the holders I bolted the holders on to a steel bar then used a screwdriver and a mallet to push the pad off the holder. Putting a new pad back on was the reverse of removal but with a lot of finger pressure to push the pad on to the holder. I used the side of the screwdriver for leverage. Worked well for me.

Shimano pads just require that you back out the setscrew by about 4 complete turns then sliding the pads off with finger pressure. Putting them back in is the reverse of removal and can be done with the holders still on the brakes!

Shimano holders will bolt on to Campy brakes (and vice-versa).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Squidward said:
I'll start by commenting on your comment on the Shimano design being superior. I removed a wheel on my commuter bike that has Shimano pads and holders but the brakes have no quick releases. I pushed the wheel on to the frame through the pads and one of the pads popped out without much effort. So much for the Shimano design being superior. Luckily, they were easy enough to put back on.

Campy pads are installed on the holders through a tight dovetail interference fit. Shimano pads have a slot on either side that the pads slide on through with a setscrew to prevent the pads from sliding off. Can Shimano pads be used on Campy holders (or vice versa)? I absolutely would not recommend it for safety reasons, though they could be forced on to the wrong holders. Don't do it!

To get the Campy pads off the holders I bolted the holders on to a steel bar then used a screwdriver and a mallet to push the pad off the holder. Putting a new pad back on was the reverse of removal but with a lot of finger pressure to push the pad on to the holder. I used the side of the screwdriver for leverage. Worked well for me.

Shimano pads just require that you back out the setscrew by about 4 complete turns then sliding the pads off with finger pressure. Putting them back in is the reverse of removal and can be done with the holders still on the brakes!

Shimano holders will bolt on to Campy brakes (and vice-versa).
I'm a campyphile, but frankly, in this instance, the Shimano design is superior. You can swap out pads w/o distrubing the toe of the shoes, making it much easier to swap out wheelsets.

I've never seen a Shimano pad fail and pop out on the road.

I'm just going to buy a set of Dura ace shoes and be done w/ it.
 

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Quick way to remove the pads from the holders

I just pull the wheel off allowing easy access to the pads. Then I use a small thin screw driver and gently slip it between the pad and holder from the open end of the brake shoe and pry out the pad. It takes maybe 3-4 seconds to get it out. Very easy. I used to try to push them out as well, and it was very difficult. To put them back in, just use some spit or rubbing alcohol and push them back in.
 
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