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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brother and I bought two road bikes last year. His weighed about 40 lbs (I think he said they started the production in 1960). and is pretty old. Mine is probably 6 - 10 years old. We bought these at a garage sale, we just wanted to start riding in the bike trails. And we were hooked.

So anyways we want two cheap bikes. At around $200

Here are some I found:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BTEIIU/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-7723219-8813638?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=3375251

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FDDDGU/ref=nosim/002-7723219-8813638?n=3375251

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?dest=9999999997&product_id=4698938&sourceid=1500000000000001245810

Do you think these are good?

Maybe you can suggest some better ones.
 

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No sh*t. You can still buy a Scwinn Varsity? I wonder how many miles I put on the 2 I had when I was riding back and forth to the BigT Burger in my teens. No question which one I'd get, just for nostalgia's sake. Only thing is, I'm on a crusade to put Wal Mart out of business, so I'd have to find it somewhere else. And in all seriousness, can't you find a better quality used for $200? I gave away my old Raliegh Technium, sold my old Cannondale for around that, I'm sure there's others in your area like me that would be happy to see their old bike get into the hands of somebody who would appreciate it. Good luck!
 

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They just brought the thing back out.

Maybe they're trying to invent the hardware-store 10-speed that I heard was popular in a life before mine?

Do your current "old" bikes work all right? If so, I don't know how much improvement and pleasure you'll get out of a bike that costs as much as a high-end helmet.

Perhaps you can milk a bit of extra life out of those. For $400-600 instead of $200 (I know, it's a 150% increase, but not much in the bigger scope of things) you can get a nice, entry-level bike by a reputable manufacturer with quality components.

My friend works at a local bike shop, and one of those "GMC denalis" came in when he was on shift to fix a flat tire. Here's what we found:

* They have no brake quick release whatsoever. You cannot install a wheel with an inflated tyre.
* They use a bizzarre, long-stem schraeder-valved (the big car-type) tube in their deep-section, 36-spoke wheels. It's not available anywhere else we know of. Ended up just having to patch it; thankfully it wasn't too bad
* The bolts are, of course, made out of very cheap metal, and are extremely easy to strip out.
* Hopefully they rigged up that multi-piece, glued together handlebar well enough to avoid it breaking and big lawsuits! I would feel uneasy trying to grip-shift a roadbike down a descent or something, especially on a bar like that. I haven't heard of anyone breaking them, though.
* "Aluminum" aside, it weighs around 30 pounds. I swear those wheels alone weigh 8-10 lbs.
* The brakes do stop the bike. So would dragging your feet on the ground like Fred Flintstone.

It seemed a functional, but disposable, thing. I won't bother with my ethics about that, for the moment, but if you're at all interested in riding farther and have ever held a wrench in your life, I think your used bikes could go a lot longer. Certainly a lot of life and a half has been had from many decent steel bikes that are still in service.

Another buddy who's not a cycle freak like me has put perhaps 10,000 miles in the past 3 years, commuting and fitness training, on a Trek roadie fromt the 80's he got at a garage sale for $175.
He's really not had to do much to it, and it still soldiers on quite well. It's got a 6-speed freewheel and downtube shifters, Shimano components (600, I think.) Chains cost him like $11...
 

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n00bsauce
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I've bought and sold many bikes in the $200 price range. My most recent sale was an 8spd Softride Solo to my bro-in-law for $150. My most recent purchase was a pristine 1989 7spd Schwinn Circuit for $200. Both of these would be better than the dime store variety bikes you listed.

Go to your local bike shop and have them show you their used bike section. Ask for advice on what to buy. Tell them how you intend to use the bikes. Don't look at the new bikes, you'll just get bike lust. Don't worry about how many speeds the bike has or what the frame is made of or even the make or color. Look for the highest quality components and frame you can get for your money. Buy the bikes and ride the begeezus out of them. When you're ready to upgrade you'll be able to sell the bikes you bought (assuming you kept them in good shape) for about what you paid for them. You'll be older and wiser about what you want and how much you're willing to invest. That will be the time to go to the local bike shop again.

This time you will be allowed to look at the new bikes, care about how many speeds they have, what they're made of, who makes them and what color they are. Buy the bike that makes your heart flutter and ride the begeezus out of it. Repeat (only if you're like me you won't want to sell the old one and you'll start your collection).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Argentius said:
They just brought the thing back out.

Maybe they're trying to invent the hardware-store 10-speed that I heard was popular in a life before mine?

Do your current "old" bikes work all right? If so, I don't know how much improvement and pleasure you'll get out of a bike that costs as much as a high-end helmet.

Perhaps you can milk a bit of extra life out of those. For $400-600 instead of $200 (I know, it's a 150% increase, but not much in the bigger scope of things) you can get a nice, entry-level bike by a reputable manufacturer with quality components.

My friend works at a local bike shop, and one of those "GMC denalis" came in when he was on shift to fix a flat tire. Here's what we found:

* They have no brake quick release whatsoever. You cannot install a wheel with an inflated tyre.
* They use a bizzarre, long-stem schraeder-valved (the big car-type) tube in their deep-section, 36-spoke wheels. It's not available anywhere else we know of. Ended up just having to patch it; thankfully it wasn't too bad
* The bolts are, of course, made out of very cheap metal, and are extremely easy to strip out.
* Hopefully they rigged up that multi-piece, glued together handlebar well enough to avoid it breaking and big lawsuits! I would feel uneasy trying to grip-shift a roadbike down a descent or something, especially on a bar like that. I haven't heard of anyone breaking them, though.
* "Aluminum" aside, it weighs around 30 pounds. I swear those wheels alone weigh 8-10 lbs.
* The brakes do stop the bike. So would dragging your feet on the ground like Fred Flintstone.

It seemed a functional, but disposable, thing. I won't bother with my ethics about that, for the moment, but if you're at all interested in riding farther and have ever held a wrench in your life, I think your used bikes could go a lot longer. Certainly a lot of life and a half has been had from many decent steel bikes that are still in service.

Another buddy who's not a cycle freak like me has put perhaps 10,000 miles in the past 3 years, commuting and fitness training, on a Trek roadie fromt the 80's he got at a garage sale for $175.
He's really not had to do much to it, and it still soldiers on quite well. It's got a 6-speed freewheel and downtube shifters, Shimano components (600, I think.) Chains cost him like $11...
They work enough to get you from point a to point b. My brother's bike is a light blue like this " :ciappa: " I laugh inside everytime I see it. My bike is a burgundy color.

The trail we go to is 5 miles long and we do 10 miles. It has some hill parts to it and I gotta tell you it's pretty exhausting going up them with those bikes especially with the 40 lbs. bike.
 
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