Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This January I will turn 50, no big deal but thought some background might apply. I got back into riding in November after a 10 year break and although it rained a ton here in N. Calif I have around 1,800 miles under my belt, since I do not race I guess that makes me a recreational rider. I am out at least 4-5 times a week and the length of each ride varies depending on my work schedule with a longer ride on Saturday or Sunday.

Many times I have "no legs" and feel fatigued, would this be because I don't rest enough or often enough, is there a "general" rule of thumb for recovery? thanks....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
995 Posts
I was in a similar situation you're in except i'm 60 and have been back riding for about 20 months. You don't state how much time or miles you are putting in or whether you jump up your long distance on the weekends too much. My guess is that unless you have over done your longer weekend rides, you are not riding too much in terms of total endurance miles.

But is suspect you are riding too hard most or all of your rides. Twice a week doing a "hard" ride is sufficient-more and you may not be able to recover. Common mistake is to go too hard on days that should be easy and not hard enough on days that should be hard-if you want the ability to ride stronger and faster. Hard is climbing hills, or long distance, or riding fast solo or in a group or doing intervals. I fiind on of the advantages of a heart rate monitor is to help hold me back on my easy days so I can recover. An example of what I'm suggesting is to go hard on Tuesday and the on Saturday. Recover on the other days with short easy rides and only ride the 4-5 days a week that you are riding. If Saturday is a long ride, resist going long on Sunday just because you have the time. Also be sure you are not dehydrated and are eating properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The missing details

I have 3 "loops" I do which are dependent on time available.

Loop (1) Flat for a total of 15 miles, I try to be at around 20-23 mph.
Loop (2) 25 miles with 3 short hills, I jam each hill as hard as I can
Loop (3) This is a 40 mile ride with a very difficult climb (difficult for me anyway) and I only rotate this loop in when I feel good, which is to say not that often.
My "longer" weekend ride is anywhere from 50-60 miles, any more would be pushing it as I am waisted from that effort.

Switching topics... I lost weight the first few months down from 220 to 195 and feel much better but I can't seem to get below 195. I am 6' tall and would be considered "thick" in the upper body, does a person's body only respond to a certain level when you age? Used to be I could get to 170 when I was younger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
995 Posts
Back to my question and hopefully point-these are all "hard" rides. If you are doing these 4-5 times of week you will get (and apparently are by your OP) over trained and not recover. Go hard only twice a week and later see if you can tolerate three times-ie Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. I suspect you'll do better on just twice a week. You are going to have to ride a lot slower and easier in order to feel better and get faster, stronger if that is your goal, except for your designated "hard" days. I wouldn't worry about weight loss this time of year. Late Fall and Winter you can determine if you need to cut back on the calories. You initally loss weight easily because the riding shocked your body. It has adapted to the stress and losing more weight is hard-I know I want to loose some more but I'll get weak if I try it now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
weight loss issue...

Unfortunately, there comes a point when the only way to continue to lose weight is to begin watching the diet. I wouldn't concentrate so much on cutting calories, as it sounds like you are doing some good riding and may well need the calories you consume. Instead, I would try replacing some of the bad calories you are likely eating with better stuff. Instead of a few eggs and pancakes in the morning, head towards some fruit w/ cottege cheese and granola and a bagel. Get yourself on a good healthy eating schedule and make your calories count. You are already working out well, that is the only piece of the puzzle that may need some changing.

oh...and btw...don't be afraid to suck back a cheeseburger and some ice cream on sunday night while you're watching cyclism sundays as a reward for your long ride of the week. I'm 6'3" and about 203 - 205lbs (a pretty darn lean 205, if that's believable for cycling sized people)...I understand the need for some beef and ice cream
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
yeah if your trying the whole weight loss thing...eat in moderation, and high intensity training in moderation.

Anyways I wont be turning 50 for anthother 28 years so I really dont have that much advice:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,358 Posts
If I feel tired and slow after a half hour or so into a ride, I know I'm tired and need a rest day. I always take a rest day on mondays after the weekend rides, and usually take one other day off during the week. I also take an easy week about once a month, usually after a particularly hard week or event. I started cycling five years ago after an eight year layoff. For the first year I only rode about three times a week. Don't push it. Listen to your body. If you need rest, rest. Erring on the side of more rest is better than erring on the side of too much riding.

Longer rides at an endurance pace will burn more calories than short fast rides. Are you eating on your 50-60 mile rides? You have to eat.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
657 Posts
Rondo said:
This January I will turn 50, no big deal but thought some background might apply. I got back into riding in November after a 10 year break and although it rained a ton here in N. Calif I have around 1,800 miles under my belt, since I do not race I guess that makes me a recreational rider. I am out at least 4-5 times a week and the length of each ride varies depending on my work schedule with a longer ride on Saturday or Sunday.

Many times I have "no legs" and feel fatigued, would this be because I don't rest enough or often enough, is there a "general" rule of thumb for recovery? thanks....
What happened to the "rule of thumb" gage where you measure your resting heart rate in the morning soon as you wake up before you get out of bed. Get a baseline measure w/ easy training. You can tell if you are still recovering if your rate is up. Helps you not to over train. Over training does not increase performance unless done w/ more scientific equipment than you can afford. Take the day off & eat really well –lots of high quality protein & carbs.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top