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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an earlier thread I suggested that the 585 frame was flexy, which was causing instability at high speeds and on descents. I was wrong.

I have done a lot more riding on the 585, tightened up a few things (headset and hubs), and come to the conclusion that there is no noticeable frame flex. While it certainly isn't the world's stiffest frame, there is no real flex worth mentioning.

I think what I was describing was the effect of a combination of things, including faster steering, a slightly "softer" ride, a more aggressive position and a shorter wheelbase than my previous bike (a Trek 5500) which has fairly relaxed handling. With the Look, it has been necessary to adapt to the handling of the bike, get used to the faster steering, move further back in the saddle on descents, and a few other minor adaptations to the "new" (now 5 months old) bike. And after all that - I now love the 585.

So I withdraw my earlier comments and I apologise if I misled anyone or caused anyone to hesitate in buying the 585, which is a truly outstanding bike.
 

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great to hear.

rossb said:
In an earlier thread I suggested that the 585 frame was flexy, which was causing instability at high speeds and on descents. I was wrong.

I have done a lot more riding on the 585, tightened up a few things (headset and hubs), and come to the conclusion that there is no noticeable frame flex.
FWIW, re-check that your front wheel is *dead-straight* in relation to the handle-bars (90-degrees). I had just the tiniest off-centre front wheel on my Madone 5.9 and experienced nervous down-hills trips at any speed above ~35-40kmh. Once I spent some time making sure the front wheel was 90-degrees in relation to handle-bars (and straight in relation to the frame) the Madone started to go dead-straight too. I reckon this might explain some of the nervous high-speed handling of your Look (or any other bike for that matter).

Enjoy, stay upright, be mindful of the morons driving cars.
 

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I like my 585 better when it is fitted with a 120 stem, rather than a 110. I feel more planted on the front end when required. This would probably be true of any frame, but especially the 585: with such a light front end (HSC5SL), it can bounce if you aren't weighting the front wheel enough. With the right amount of weight up there, it tracks very straight. The only frame I have ridden that was noticeably better in the front end is a Pinarello Dogma, but at a substantial weight penalty (1225g frame/390g fork).
 

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On my bike, I shortened the stem from a 110 to a 90. It tightened up the ride for me it seems. I've done a couple of big descents on it and it was very confidence inspiring.

francois
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On my bike, I shortened the stem from a 110 to a 90. It tightened up the ride for me it seems. I've done a couple of big descents on it and it was very confidence inspiring.
Perhaps shortening the stem causes you to move back in the saddle, putting more weight over the rear wheel?
 

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dawgcatching said:
I like my 585 better when it is fitted with a 120 stem, rather than a 110. I feel more planted on the front end when required. This would probably be true of any frame, but especially the 585: with such a light front end (HSC5SL), it can bounce if you aren't weighting the front wheel enough. With the right amount of weight up there, it tracks very straight. The only frame I have ridden that was noticeably better in the front end is a Pinarello Dogma, but at a substantial weight penalty (1225g frame/390g fork).
Start with a 120 stem then find a frame that fits it.
 
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