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· Fast No More.
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Did they even have the 4-Axis in 2005? Looks like the smudginess under the 1st half of the logo could be WCS, but no rainbow stripes. I think Pro's came in 73 deg with that graphic scheme - looks 73 to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback and extra photo.

I spent some time searching through google images for pictures of Ritchey stems and I couldn't see any that had the same logo. Now that I know it is a 73 degree that is all that I need to buy a similar Ritchey stem at the same angle.
 

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wim said:
This 15 July 2005 Tour de France picture shows him with a Ritchey Pro stem—the one with the two separate silver front clamp pieces.
WCS stems of that era also had two silver clamps.

It looks like a Ritchey Pro to me...that decal scheme plus the steerer clamp bolts don't look right to be WCS. If they were adding weight to get over 6.8kg then the Pro would make sense as the WCS was pretty flexy and would be a good place to add a few grams.
 

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Wasn't that the year one of the Gerolsteiner guys snapped a WCS stem in the finale of one of the classics or early stage races? Seem to remember CN making a point that lots of dudes were running Pro vs WCS level components as the season went on for exactly the reason LW mentioned - flex-o-rific.
 

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I thought that Pro stems had black clamps, and the WCS had silver. Could it be a Pro stem with WCS clamps????
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What is the 'standard' length for a stem? I bought a new frame and will be buying all the parts online. Is the average stem length about 110mm? Would that be the safest length to start?

I am now looking for a Ritchey Pro in a 73 degree but unfortunately there are none in stock at probikekit. None on ebay either :( ... Any other online ideas?
 

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advice...

The Ritchey 4-axis is the best stem I've ever used. That's what I would recommend.

I also ge the impression that you may be buying a stem based on looks rather than what you know fits properly. If you're buying a new frame you should know before you buy the frame, what length of stem is required and what angle, combined with a specific head tube length, headset height and spacer combination will produce you desired handlebar height.

I'd never buy a frame without knowing how it would be setup FIRST.

As an example, I want the top of my bar about 87cm from the floor to the top of the bars. That requires a total stack height of 145mm, with an 84 degree stem. I get that with a 125mm head tube, a 15mm headset and a 5mm spacer under the stem. If I were to buy a 73 degree stem, I'd need another 20mm of spacer and I don't like the looks of that.

Stem length needs to be figured by comparing the reach of some other bike you've owned. If you're a beginner, then you need a fitting. Buying a 110mm stem is as good a guess as any, but you can expect to buy at least one more, when your first guess doesn't work out. Your choice of stem length is also affected by handlebar reach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hmm interesting C-40!

Yes. You are sort of correct with your comment that I am buying the stem based on the looks rather than the fit. I bought a frame on eBay and felt that I was between sizes M or L. I saw the CR1 of Chris Horner and he is the same height as myself (not sure about inseam and other measurements though) ... and was trying to match the reasonably aggressive look.

I am not sure that I am sufficiently experienced to have such confidence in my bike set-up measurements. I assume you need to a lot of kms on a lot of bikes to get a feel for what is the best setup - or find an experienced fitter. Not sure I really trust the guys in my LBSs.
 

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rules of thumb...

An agressive position will place the top of the bars 8-12cm below the saddle. Always set the saddle fore/aft position first, then adjust the stem length. An agressive length will allow you to pedal in the hook section of the bars with the upper back nearly horizontal and not have any contact between the arms and knees. Any longer length serves no purpose.

As a rough guideline for saddle height, position the saddle so you foot sits horizontal with the leg locked out at the bottom of the stroke. During normal pedaling, a 2-3cm rise in the heel will produce the commonly recommended 30 degree bend at the knee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the tips C-40. I have a big shopping weekend lined up to get all the bits together! Once all the deliveries arrive, then I can cross my fingers and start assembling & adjusting according to your tips :)
 
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