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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Oh there is a correlation. I promise. Just not the one you're expecting.

It seems that far too many cyclists are horribly unprepared for roadside mechanicals - even flats. I don't expect everyone to be able to true a wheel or repair carbon. I'm talking about adjusting a derailleur or changing a flat in under 5 minutes. I find that on many group rides, when someone flats, someone else ends up jumping in to help (read: take over so the group can resume before everyone cools down). On one hand, I think "let them do it so they can learn" on the other hand, "holding up 15 people is not the time to learn".

I really don't mind helping - not at all. But what I do mind, is working on a nasty grimy drivetrain that hasn't seen a brush in 2,000 miles! Then the person helping is left with nasty grimy hands. And I have white bar tape!

So, to you guys who'd rather ride than wrench (not that there's anything wrong with that), please please keep your bikes clean as a courtesy to that guy who's going to offer - and your going to accept - help in changing that tube. ;) Oh, and don't offer a mini pump - have some bigboy CO2s on hand... really. ;)
 

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Yeah, I see where you're coming from. I'm one of those who will change the flat out quickly. My bikes always clean and the car is always dirty...priorities are right. I always carry these little packs of wipes in my saddle bag. They come in handy for wiping off that black grime that's on all the bikes. There's just riders who are very good that never clean their drivetrain.
 

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I'm pretty good at fixing flats and doing other roadside repairs. Lots of experience. But I like to take time to do it right, which includes checking the tire carefully for something embedded that might have caused the flat. I don't try to pretend that it's a pit stop in the Indy500 with a stop watch on me. If it's a group ride, well then people just have to have a little patience. A couple extra minutes won't kill them. It's not a race.

And I really hate it when someone who thinks that they are Sheldon Brown reincarnated wants to jump in and provide unsolicited assistance.

BTW, a dirty drivetrain shouldn't be an issue. You should be able to repair a flat, front or rear, without ever touching the chain.
 

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OP - I've got a solution for your dirt dilemma. I carry 2 sets of surgical gloves in my seat bag...along with my tube changing equipment of course. This way whether I'm changing my tube, where I typically have a clean drive train or someone else's I'm guaranteed not to get my hands dirty. The surgical gloves take up practically no room in my bag.

Problem solved....at for me anyway. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm pretty good at fixing flats and doing other roadside repairs. Lots of experience. But I like to take time to do it right, which includes checking the tire carefully for something embedded that might have caused the flat. I don't try to pretend that it's a pit stop in the Indy500 with a stop watch on me. If it's a group ride, well then people just have to have a little patience. A couple extra minutes won't kill them. It's not a race.

And I really hate it when someone who thinks that they are Sheldon Brown reincarnated wants to jump in and provide unsolicited assistance.

BTW, a dirty drivetrain shouldn't be an issue. You should be able to repair a flat, front or rear, without ever touching the chain.
Wow... figured it'd take 5 or 6 posts before I had to "defend" my post. Okay, here we go.
1. I never jump in and help unless asked or it's obvious the person wants help.
2. I never swap tubes without inspecting the tire for what caused the flat.
3. I always take the time to partially inflate - checking for proper seating of tube/tire
4. Of course you can change a (rear) wheel/tube without touching the chain. The point about the filthy drivetrain was that that is indicative of a generally filthy bike (see post title) and even the late Mr. Brown couldn't change a wheel without touching the wheel.

Saturday, I helped swap tubes on a very nice ($4,000+) bike that was so dirty, the rim and tire left my hands black.

My point in this post had nothing to do with arrogantly rushing a tube swap for a PR. It was to suggest to those that seek/welcome help on bike repair/maintenance/tube swaps to do what they can to make that task easier on their helpers - such as keeping the bike clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OP - I've got a solution for your dirt dilemma. I carry 2 sets of surgical gloves in my seat bag...along with my tube changing equipment of course. This way whether I'm changing my tube, where I typically have a clean drive train or someone else's I'm guaranteed not to get my hands dirty. The surgical gloves take up practically no room in my bag.

Problem solved....at for me anyway. :D
That's a great idea. I keep a box of those on my bench at home. Why I hadn't thought to put a couple in bike kit is beyond me. Oh, and they have the added effect of scaring the help seeker into thinking they're in for more than a tube swap ;-)
 

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I'm lucky enough to have hardly any flats so I don't keep in practice. It's easy but would most likely take me longer than 5 minutes because it's been a while. I guess I'll need to do it a couple times in the basement to refresh - never hurts to keep sharp.

Great idea about the gloves in the bag. I use them when working on the bike at home but for some reason, didn't make the connection to take a pair when I ride.
 

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...................................., "holding up 15 people is not the time to learn"..............
Here's one solution.

Only two or three of the stronger riders should stay with the flatted rider and the remainder of the group should soft pedal on up the road.

After the flat is repaired. the strong riders can bridge back to the group. Sort of like real racing. :)

Having 15 riders stand around the side of the road is usually a dangerous situation since they often stand around IN the road.
 

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Wow... figured it'd take 5 or 6 posts before I had to "defend" my post. .
You started a new thread that was basically a gripe about other cyclists, and you didn't think you would get an opposong view? Are you new to this forum?
 

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Sorry for going off topic

A couple of weeks ago one of the guys in our four man paceline flatted. Another guy said he used to be a bike mechanic in college and volunteered to fix the flat. He took off the entire tire and tube barehanded, inspected the tire and rim for troublemakers, installed new tube in the tire, remounted the tire and tube on the rim barehanded, and then inflated the tire with a CO2 pump.
What's the big deal? It took him about 3 minutes from start to finish and he wasn't in a hurry. The rest of us were just slack jawed at his skills. Any other time the group stops to fix a flat, it's a 15 to 20 minute ordeal.
 

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You started a new thread that was basically a gripe about other cyclists, and you didn't think you would get an opposong view? Are you new to this forum?
You didn't offer an opposing view, you totaly twisted what the OP stated.

He posted about riders that don't know how to change a flat, not jumping in at every chance to help like a Sheldon.

He also said keep the bike clean, not the chain. I've seen plenty of bikes that are going to thrash your hands no matter where you touch the bike, chainstays, seatstays, seat tube.

Nothing wrong with posting an opposing view but please, keep in line! Your whiney post has nothing to do with what the OP stated.:cryin:
 

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You didn't offer an opposing view, you totaly twisted what the OP stated.

He posted about riders that don't know how to change a flat, not jumping in at every chance to help like a Sheldon.

He also said keep the bike clean, not the chain. I've seen plenty of bikes that are going to thrash your hands no matter where you touch the bike, chainstays, seatstays, seat tube.

Nothing wrong with posting an opposing view but please, keep in line! Your whiney post has nothing to do with what the OP stated.:cryin:
Hey, the OP said I made a good point, and that's good enough for me.
 

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A couple of weeks ago one of the guys in our four man paceline flatted. Another guy said he used to be a bike mechanic in college and volunteered to fix the flat. He took off the entire tire and tube barehanded, inspected the tire and rim for troublemakers, installed new tube in the tire, remounted the tire and tube on the rim barehanded, and then inflated the tire with a CO2 pump.
What's the big deal? It took him about 3 minutes from start to finish and he wasn't in a hurry. The rest of us were just slack jawed at his skills. Any other time the group stops to fix a flat, it's a 15 to 20 minute ordeal.
15 to 20 minute ordeal??? No wonder someone jumped in and did it for you guys! Instead of working on your paceline skills next Saturday, maybe you should spend sometime exchanging tubes in your tires:p
 

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just do it... and wipe the grease/junk on their bartape as you hand the bike back and say 'glad to help'
or don't, and let some other do-gooder help. heck you don't even need to stop w/ the latter...
 

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You didn't offer an opposing view, you totaly twisted what the OP stated.

He posted about riders that don't know how to change a flat, not jumping in at every chance to help like a Sheldon.

He also said keep the bike clean, not the chain. I've seen plenty of bikes that are going to thrash your hands no matter where you touch the bike, chainstays, seatstays, seat tube.

Nothing wrong with posting an opposing view but please, keep in line! Your whiney post has nothing to do with what the OP stated.:cryin:
I am with Alan here. OP said drive train. Also, if he does not like dirty bikes, don't help the rider with a flat. Seems simple enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
... if he does not like dirty bikes, don't help the rider with a flat. Seems simple enough.
Sorry. Not how I roll. I'm not going to make a guy struggle, get embarrassed and frustrated while he prolongs a delay, to keep from getting my hands dirty. My point (again) was to suggest to those who seek/welcome help on bike repair/maintenance/tube swaps to do what they can to make that task easier on their helpers - such as keeping the bike clean.

Pretty simple concept. Not too controversial.
 
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