Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What brands and models would you be looking at?

Just a little about me. I am an avid motorcyclist. I am slightly overweight and would like to get a road bike for fitness and also because I moved right by the ocean in socal and it is just a popular and bike friendly community I live in.

About what I am looking for. Nothing vintage or retro, i am looking for a more modern machine that is fairly quality but yet a bike that if i decide this isnt for me I can just resell or take my loss on. With that being said I wouldnt want to spend more than $500.00

Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Craigslist has a lot of good deals, as sellers need money these days and many buyers are hesitant to buy used. To be safe and not have to worry about resale value too much, stay with the popular brands (Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, Giant, Fuji, etc.)....not that there aren't MANY other competent brands, these are just the easier ones to unload should you not like biking. Look through these "Beginner" threads to see what the others are buying for their first bikes.

The main issue is where you will get your fitting information, if you don't already know how to do it yourself. That is the main benefit of your local bike shop (LBS), other than getting a NEW bike, more cycling info, parts, accessories, etc....that is what the bike shops are for. That said, I bought used off of Ebay and got a great deal after doing exhaustive research on fitting and trying out many bikes on the road. No bike shop had the correct fitting bike that I had settled on, so that's why I bought it on Ebay. But that is not for the faint of heart if money is an issue, because you don't get to ride or see the bike. But at least I knew it should fit and I spoke to the seller a few times.

I'd say you need to visit the local shop and start asking questions, maybe demo a few bikes, definitely research the internet, and decide if you can find one yourself or want the LBS services to get you dialed in.

Funny, I ride sportbike motorcycles and also turned to cycling because I just wasn't getting any exercise :blush2: Now I'm semi-addicted to cycling. I WISH I was a 40 yr. old....53 yrs. here.


**
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Erion929 said:
Craigslist has a lot of good deals, as sellers need money these days and many buyers are hesitant to buy used. To be safe and not have to worry about resale value too much, stay with the popular brands (Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, Giant, Fuji, etc.)....not that there aren't MANY other competent brands, these are just the easier ones to unload should you not like biking.
**
I am currently looking at CL and have read through many pages in this forum already. I see that most people end up buying new. I also value your advice on visiting the local shop to get fitted and I plan to do that. I will just be honest and let them know what my intentions are up front.

I sold my last sportbike b4 moving to San Diego (zx-12) and now am reduced to one motorcycle BMW GS, so I have a lot of time to Bike. I am hoping it will be something I enjoy and as a side note will help with fitness.

Thank you for your brand suggestions.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Rightcross said:
I am currently looking at CL and have read through many pages in this forum already. I see that most people end up buying new. I also value your advice on visiting the local shop to get fitted and I plan to do that. I will just be honest and let them know what my intentions are up front.

I sold my last sportbike b4 moving to San Diego (zx-12) and now am reduced to one motorcycle BMW GS, so I have a lot of time to Bike. I am hoping it will be something I enjoy and as a side note will help with fitness.

Thank you for your brand suggestions.
If you've done any research here on RBR you may already know this, but because you're still undecided between new or used, just one clarification on the fitting process.

Sizing comes before fitting, so unless the bike is sized correctly for you, you'll never get a good fit. That said, if you go the used route, choose the wrong size and bring it to the LBS for a fitting, they're going to be hard pressed to get you dialed in. One way to avoid that is to get the fitting done at the LBS before shopping used. When they fit you to their bike, make note of the year, brand, model and frame size and when shopping for your next bike compare its geometry to the test bike. The closer the numbers, the better the final fit (presumably done at the LBS) will likely be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
as with Erion, 53 here also and rode a hybrid for most of my life, but purchased my road bike last year. Wish I was 40 again, so I could have been riding those years as well.

Hopefully you will find something within your budget. I don't have a lot of experience with CL, but if you are buyig used, make sure you get the correct size. Stop by your LBS and see what they have as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
It might be worth finding a good shop that sells a lot of used bikes since that way you get better fitting and somebody to service while still paying less. Somebody like Sellwood Cycle Repair in Portland would be a good bet, or a shop with a rental fleet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,541 Posts
spend another 200 and the world of intermediate road bikes is at your fingertips

specialized allez is a really, really good move for seven bucks. good component mix, frame, and construction that will stick with you for a couple years at least

the thing is with used, unless you get lucky, you never really know who had it, where's it been, how it may have been damaged. might as well spend a little more to get a lot more, like new components, warranty, and most important, service contract for maintenance and repair for the first year, that is critical. a used bike is almost definitely going to require service at some point, probably soon after you get it--that's gonna cost you the two bucks you could have spent in the first place to get new anyway...

in your shoes i would get the allez, its a better entry/intermediate than those furnished by giant, trek, or cannondale imo
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
Used is great when you know exactly what you want but if it's not the right size, fitting it won't help and you'll end up getting something else. In the end, you'll spend a lot more doing it that way. Now that the dead horse beating is out of the way... :)

If there's a used bike store that has nice stuff, that might be perfect and $500 should buy something pretty decent. OTOH, spending a little more to get something new might be smart money too. Finding the right shop to deal with (shop for the LBS first, then the bike), you'll get help with sizing, probably a free basic fitting (that should be enough at least for now) and probably some free maintenance. Just the "hey, can you take a look at this" has been a big help to me.

I just took my two-year old bike in yesterday to get the bottom bracket tightened up since they're next door to work and don't charge for this. I could buy $40 worth of tools and learn how to do it (which might be a good idea) but I don't have to mess with it and they'll check the other stuff over too. With a used bike, there'd be this $40 set of tools, something else later and all of that = less riding. However learning how to do your own basic stuff is really important (fix a flat, basic adjustments). Add to it as you're interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for the kind advice. One thing I am not daunted by bicycle maintenance. I do my own motorcycle maintenance as it is right now. I have rebuilt my own top end, set valves and rebuilt carbs. Basic bike maintenance isnt something that I am worried about, i have a fully stocked garage.

I think going to a store that sells used is probably the best advice for me right now. I do want to make sure I get a proper sized bike.

One thing I am unclear of is the sizing. For instance, I am 5'10 and most bikes call for a 54cm or a 56 cm for my size. On top of this what more can you guys tell me about sizing and fit? bar reach? what other factors entail to a fitting.

I have bought and sold maybe 100 different motorcycles. I dont presume to think that makes me an expert on bicycles but I am probably pretty comfortable with knowing what "feels" right but I could use this last piece of advice on fitting before I take the plunge this weekend or next week.

Again thank you all for the help.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
Rightcross said:
Thank you all for the kind advice. One thing I am not daunted by bicycle maintenance. I do my own motorcycle maintenance as it is right now. I have rebuilt my own top end, set valves and rebuilt carbs. Basic bike maintenance isnt something that I am worried about, i have a fully stocked garage.

I think going to a store that sells used is probably the best advice for me right now. I do want to make sure I get a proper sized bike.

One thing I am unclear of is the sizing. For instance, I am 5'10 and most bikes call for a 54cm or a 56 cm for my size. On top of this what more can you guys tell me about sizing and fit? bar reach? what other factors entail to a fitting.

I have bought and sold maybe 100 different motorcycles. I dont presume to think that makes me an expert on bicycles but I am probably pretty comfortable with knowing what "feels" right but I could use this last piece of advice on fitting before I take the plunge this weekend or next week.

Again thank you all for the help.
First off, I tend to agree that if you want to keep within your budget but want an LBS's guidance, buying used from one is apt to be your best option.

As far as sizing and frame sizes are concerned, here's the bottom line. Since there are no industry standards for measuring or determining frame size, brand a's 54cm may be brand b's 56cm. And it sometimes gets worse - within the same brands different models of the same frame sizes have different measurements. That said, it's best not to fret over the label with a number affixed to a frame, rather, visit the LBS's that carry used (or get fitted as I mentioned previously) and use those measurements (not frame sizes) as your guide.

Answering your fitting question, there are several types, but they basically come down to a standard LBS fitting (included with a bike purchase or running around $50-$75 if purchased separately) and a pro fitting. The pro fit, depending on how involved it is can range anywhere from $150-$350.

For your purposes, the standard fitting will do you fine, and will likely include some measurement taken, then you'll ride a trainer bike (some LBS's use size cycles, some use a standard bike that meets your sizing requirements mounted to a stationary trainer), saddle height will be set, then fore/ aft (after measuring for KOPS - knee over pedal spindle) then the saddle will likely be leveled. Reach and drop will be checked and (if needed) stem length and angle will be adjusted. Once saddle to bar reach and drop have been set, the fitter may go back and tweak saddle fore/ aft and height.

Once that's done (and assuming you aren't deciding on a clipless pedal system just yet) the fitter may have you test ride the bike - getting a sense for the fit/ feel, ride and handling. A good fit will instill confidence and a feeling of control, while a bad fit may make the bike feel skittish, because f/r weight distribution could be off. While that's something to keep in mind, if you're working with a competent fitter, it's not likely you'll be sized wrong, but it does happen.

Finally, I suggest that during this process you take an active role. If something doesn't feel right (or does) the fitter should know. And once you're back from the test ride provide feedback on what worked and what didn't, because it's not unusual to have to tweak initial fit - sometimes a few times.

HTH...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,541 Posts
which goes back to what i'm saying, you're going to wind up paying more for service (in this case, say an extra buck for a fitting), when the opportunity cost of buying new would get you all the features you need and then some, including a fitting. these are features, repeat, that you WILL NOT GET when you buy used.

iow you have to spend an extra hundred to get a fitting on the used bike that costs you five. that already takes you up to six. why not pay the seven and get new? ok so you can do your own maintenance, fine, i get that. but how much does it cost you not to know where the bike's been and what its been through? with new there is no worry, no not knowing. with new you get..., well, NEW, the latest in modern tech, all components factory fresh, and who doesnt dig that new shyt smell, touch, and feel, come on. with new you get a ffitting, plus support from your lbs, not just on the mechanics, but on the all the other shyt you need to know when you start riding, like advice --on shoes, helmet, other supporting equipment, on where to ride, and when, on how to ride, on how to make minor adjustments here and there that will tweak your equipment's performance--some of which might be basically familiar to you based on your experience with motorcycles, but other of which is gonna be not as familiar because there is certain informatin, certain technology, basically, that will apply only to non motorized cycling vehicles.


unless you get a sick deal on a used bike for the five, six including the fit, every advantage inures to you long term to just spend the extra buck and get a new bike. specialized allez, check it out, everyone i know who really wanted to ride and now owns one is completely giddy about the choice they made, couldnt be happier. jmo
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top