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I've got to get in shape.
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So, I've been riding my trainer more in recent weeks to get ready for the upcoming season. I've noticed that I have pain on the outer part of my left knee (looking down at the knee, with the kneecap at 12 o'clock, the pain is at about 8 o'clock). The research says that its ITB Syndrome.

I've got a couple of questions. First, does this ever go away (assuming that I am correct)? If so, how?

Second, when I ride one bike versus another, it seems to be much more pronounced (When I ride my Merckx versus my Litespeed Classic.). I've attempted to match my position on both bikes, but obviously the geometries of the two are quite different. Has anyone else had this issue?

Thank you.
 

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Stretch, Stretch, Rest and Ice...

Thats what i had to do back in high school when i was training 70-80 miles a week. Its really painful, but it will go away with proper treatment...

My understanding is that it results from poor biomechanics (ie, runner over/uner pronating, running on a side slope constantly(street) etc.) My guess is that one bike worsens the biomechanics more than the other... not sure though, maybe a biker here has had it befoer from biking.

i had to strech 2 x a day and ice as well, and rest, think i was off for 3 weeks and stretched heavily for about 2 months... can probably search the web for some IT band stretches... good luck, i know your pain, i could hardly walk at one point it hurt so bad...
 

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foggypeake said:
So, I've been riding my trainer more in recent weeks to get ready for the upcoming season. I've noticed that I have pain on the outer part of my left knee (looking down at the knee, with the kneecap at 12 o'clock, the pain is at about 8 o'clock). The research says that its ITB Syndrome.

I've got a couple of questions. First, does this ever go away (assuming that I am correct)? If so, how?

Second, when I ride one bike versus another, it seems to be much more pronounced (When I ride my Merckx versus my Litespeed Classic.). I've attempted to match my position on both bikes, but obviously the geometries of the two are quite different. Has anyone else had this issue?

Thank you.
I had 3 web site addresses, but now 2 don't work. Here's the one that still does:


http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0168.htm
 

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Take your bike to the doc

I had the same problem three years ago. I went to a sports med doc (and bike rider) who had me bring my bike and trainer for my first visit. Most of the exam was his watching me ride on the trainer. He corrected some things with respect to my position on the bike that he thought were aggravating the problem, sent me for physical therapy (largely stretching exercises) and I was cured. Whenever I begin to feel some pain in that area, I start stretching again and it goes away.
 

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I was diagnosed 2 years ago and it has not yet completely gone away. Good enough to do 4500+ miles last season, but it would flair up sometimes after 80 or so miles on individual rides. Stretching helps a lot, but saddle height is just as critical.

The therapist did a bunch of measurements and discovered that I have a short leg (the one that has ITB). So I adjusted my saddle height for the short leg and that helped quite a bit. Also went to shorter cranks and upped my average RPMs, and that help a bit more. I think the think that started it all was mashing from a too high saddle position.

Truth be told I had the same diagnosis from my MD (a tri athlete), a surgeon and a therapist and I still think it must be something else. It may be age as I am 56.
 

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try this stretch....stand sideways on a step with your left leg on it and the right leg hanging down, now keep your knees straight and drop your right hip towards the floor. This is a great ITB stretch...
 

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foggypeake said:
So, I've been riding my trainer more in recent weeks to get ready for the upcoming season. I've noticed that I have pain on the outer part of my left knee (looking down at the knee, with the kneecap at 12 o'clock, the pain is at about 8 o'clock). The research says that its ITB Syndrome.

I've got a couple of questions. First, does this ever go away (assuming that I am correct)? If so, how?

Second, when I ride one bike versus another, it seems to be much more pronounced (When I ride my Merckx versus my Litespeed Classic.). I've attempted to match my position on both bikes, but obviously the geometries of the two are quite different. Has anyone else had this issue?

Thank you.
I developed ITB Syndrome while in the military. Daily runs (a lot of times with a 60lb ruck sack on my back) over various terrain started to take it's toll over the years. I've been through physical therapy, etc. for it. I've always been a physically active person and will always try to be. At one point though, ITB syndrome had slowed me down . I found that if I am active and I do not include an ITB stretch in to my stretching routine, then over a short amount of time the pain will come back. I think if you are a runner or a biker, you should always include an ITB stretch in your program even if you do not suffer from it (Syndrome). I think if I knew about the stretches earlier, I could have prevented many off days from training trying to recouperate. I started out stretching 3x a day to keep the pain away. Now I only stretch it before (warm up) and after (cool down) training. I've had no problems in a while now. Depending on how serious your situation is, try a number of stretches. I only do one (very simple) and found it to be all I need. Here it is...

Stretch #1- http://www.nismat.org/ptcor/itb_stretch/
http://www.thestretchinghandbook.com/archives/knee-pain.htm

Be sure to also include a good hamstring stretch in with an ITB. A tight hamstring plays a big part in this also. If lack of stretching is not what is causing your pain it could also be one of the follwing...

1. Poor cleat alignment (toes point in). This might not fit you since one bike does not cause you any pain, unless you are using different shoes/cleats for each bike
2. Saddle height way to high on Merckx
3. Saddle height to low on Merckx
4. narrow stance (width on your pedals)

P.S.- If you haven't already, you could invest in some pedals with "Free Arc" (Look), or "Angular Float" (Time) to name a few. These features make riding more efficient and comfortable, eliminating unnatural stresses on the knees and minimizing the risk of tendinitis. If none of this seems to cause some relief, then see a doctor.
 
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