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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Piepoli quote from CN said:
"Now that I've warmed up I can talk. I don't like this weather at all, but I've had two of my best wins in this weather," said a surprised though delighted Piepoli. "I usually don't ride well in the cold and rain like this, but I have to thank Simoni even more today than last time [in La Thuile]. Simoni said to me 'Go, go!' a few times and so I did. For sure, it was him who gave me the motivation to attack today."
Here's a guy who know's how to encourage younger riders and definitely seems to be a credit to his team. If you can't go out with a win, at least go out with class. It would be cool for him to stay another year with SD, if for no other reason than to help teach younger riders the ropes.
 

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I agree.
He's never been one to mice words, and in the past he has been criticized for that (esp. re: Armstrong, 2003 Tour) but this year he seems very collected, and he's matured.
He's teaching, he's honest, he's attacking Basso, he's really good with Piepoli.

I'm sure it hurt a lot not to win at "his" Bondone, but he fought for 2nd with grit and class, and was very nice to Basso after.

He's one of the few riders who comes to the post-stage RAI interviews almost every day.
His comparison of his pedal stroke/cadence with Basso's yesterday was interesting, and he was humble about it.
 

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cadence90 said:
I agree.
He's never been one to mice words, and in the past he has been criticized for that (esp. re: Armstrong, 2003 Tour) but this year he seems very collected, and he's matured.
He's teaching, he's honest, he's attacking Basso, he's really good with Piepoli.

I'm sure it hurt a lot not to win at "his" Bondone, but he fought for 2nd with grit and class, and was very nice to Basso after.

He's one of the few riders who comes to the post-stage RAI interviews almost every day.
His comparison of his pedal stroke/cadence with Basso's yesterday was interesting, and he was humble about it.
Did you see that article in Cycle Sport where he and Basso both showed up and the Milano-San Remo Gran Fondo event the day after MSR to ride with the tifosi? I thought that was very cool as well, even though Gibo didn't make it to the finish. Very classy to show up and let the fans rub shoulders with the stars.
 

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yeah, both that CS article and what I've seen of him so far in the Giro made me like Simoni, when I wasn't so sure before after reading about him and Cunego. I like the deal with him being a 34-year old, nearing the end of his career, and still going to the Cali wind tunnel and being impressed with the new stuff he could try, etc. Seems pretty classy, and can put up the goods, too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, he has matured, i used to think he was kind of arrogant. But I read the latest ProCycling Giro issue and I just realize that in part he just gets to the point fast without much nuance and that he's an Italian - I can't expect him to speak the same way as an average joe from boston.
 

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AJL said:
Yeah, he has matured, i used to think he was kind of arrogant. But I read the latest ProCycling Giro issue and I just realize that in part he just gets to the point fast without much nuance and that he's an Italian - I can't expect him to speak the same way as an average joe from boston.
I always wondered how much of the stuff re LA was a result of translation issues and having had the chance to see RAI coverage the last 3 years it was soon clear that much of it was due to that and selective quoting.
 

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terzo rene said:
I always wondered how much of the stuff re LA was a result of translation issues and having had the chance to see RAI coverage the last 3 years it was soon clear that much of it was due to that and selective quoting.
It was mainly because of LA homers who interpret anything remotely critical of Armstrong as a crime against humanity.

Simoni's da Man. He'll fight to the very end. Cunego gave up before they even hit the real mountain stages.
 

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I'm a huge Simoni fan -- have an autographed maglia rosa with the Saeco logo in the white box in the middle that is framed in my office.

He tries his best, very human (admits he can't time trial but tries to improve), and he attacks, attacks, attacks. Watch any of the last few Giros on DVD and you'll see how often he attacks. He's a relatively little guy, rides a 51-cm frame, but he climbs like a spider. There's a great article in the current Procycling magazine with Landis on the cover, and he discusses how "impulsive" he is when he attacks.

This Giro is probably his swan song, and it will be cool to see a 34-year old champ like him on the podium on Sunday. Would be great if he takes a stage tomorrow or Saturday -- very possible if Basso gives him rope and Gutierrez can't hang on.
 

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I like Gibo sometimes

like him more now that he's learned some humility. Like him despite his doped candies from his auntie.
Do like that he's an attacking style rider.
 

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Gibo just hates losing -- that's why he whines. BFD. He's still an excellent climber and has a great attacking style. I just hope he shows up at the TdF and tries to take a stage. He wants one more high-profile stage win before he calls it quits.

It's just too bad Gibo managed to alienate Basso (apparently they were close enough friends that Basso tried to get him on CSC before the end of last season) with that "extra terrestrial" comment. Whatever.
 

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I don't know, in a press conference today Simoni claimed that Basso offered to let Simoni win if he paid him. Come on, that's just ridiculous. It'd be hard to want to follow someone who is that crazy. CSC said the day before that Basso was going to try to get the stage win in his new son's honor, I doubt he'd want to scrap that plan to get some extra pocket money.
 

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There was a long exchange b/w Simoni and Basso b/4 today's stage on RAI. Unf. it was in Italian. There was a lot of gesturing (not that that means anything) but it didn't seem like anything was resolved.

As for mentoring younger riders, Piepoli is 34, too, I believe. Anyway, I do appreciate Simoni's riding and kept hoping that he'd attack Basso up the Mortirolo.

As for winning that stage...dream on, pal. Basso had that photo of his newborn stuffed up his jersey for a reason.
 

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peter1 said:
There was a long exchange b/w Simoni and Basso b/4 today's stage on RAI. Unf. it was in Italian. There was a lot of gesturing (not that that means anything) but it didn't seem like anything was resolved.

As for winning that stage...dream on, pal. Basso had that photo of his newborn stuffed up his jersey for a reason.
I've seen it several times now (and am fluent): the exchange went like this:
1. On the descent of the Mortirolo, Basso asked Simoni not to leave him alone on the descent. Basso admits this. Simoni agreed and was definitely pacing Basso, turning his head at every corner. The RAI motorcyclists affirm this.
2. It was assumed by everyone (even at the time; therfore I assume Simoni as well) that this would be a typical racing "exchange": Simoni gets the win (or at least the chance at the sprint) for pacing Basso down the descent. If Gutierrez cracks on the Aprica, Simoni might even get second on GC.
3. 3km from the summit of the Aprica, Basso attacked unexpectedly and then resumed his pace. Simoni could not keep up. Basso takes the stage with the baby picture.

My feeling is this:
a) Basso was wrong to agree to an implicit collaboration, if he absolutely wanted the stage win. In that case, he should have let Simoni go and then caught him on the climb. Still, Simoni could not keep up with Basso, so I don't "blame" Basso for the victory. But if he asked for collaboration and then went against it, that's wrong, because Simoni would have raced differently, on the descent and towards the Aprica.

b) Simoni was wrong to take his anger to the TVs. I understand his frustration, and he is very temperamental, so I can see how he would think Basso "screwed" him. Nonetheless it was wrong to vent on TV and create this polemic. He should have more class than that. In his outbursts, however, he is often correct more than not.

Regarding the "money", I don't know: Simoni insists Basso asked for it, Basso denies it, Simoni called him a liar, and walked away. Leter he said he has lost a lot of respect for Basso.

Remember, last year Simoni lost the Giro because Savoldelli found collaboration on the last stage. Perhaps he was expecting similar help from Basso this time around.
 

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cadence90 said:
I've seen it several times now (and am fluent): the exchange went like this:
1. On the descent of the Mortirolo, Basso asked Simoni not to leave him alone on the descent. Basso admits this. Simoni agreed and was definitely pacing Basso, turning his head at every corner. The RAI motorcyclists affirm this.
2. It was assumed by everyone (even at the time; therfore I assume Simoni as well) that this would be a typical racing "exchange": Simoni gets the win (or at least the chance at the sprint) for pacing Basso down the descent. If Gutierrez cracks on the Aprica, Simoni might even get second on GC.
3. 3km from the summit of the Aprica, Basso attacked unexpectedly and then resumed his pace. Simoni could not keep up. Basso takes the stage with the baby picture.

My feeling is this:
a) Basso was wrong to agree to an implicit collaboration, if he absolutely wanted the stage win. In that case, he should have let Simoni go and then caught him on the climb. Still, Simoni could not keep up with Basso, so I don't "blame" Basso for the victory. But if he asked for collaboration and then went against it, that's wrong, because Simoni would have raced differently, on the descent and towards the Aprica.

b) Simoni was wrong to take his anger to the TVs. I understand his frustration, and he is very temperamental, so I can see how he would think Basso "screwed" him. Nonetheless it was wrong to vent on TV and create this polemic. He should have more class than that. In his outbursts, however, he is often correct more than not.

Regarding the "money", I don't know: Simoni insists Basso asked for it, Basso denies it, Simoni called him a liar, and walked away. Leter he said he has lost a lot of respect for Basso.

Remember, last year Simoni lost the Giro because Savoldelli found collaboration on the last stage. Perhaps he was expecting similar help from Basso this time around.
I don't know, from what Basso has said, he just implied that they shouldn't take risks in the decent, work together for a bit to gain some time and then duke it out at the finish. I'm thinking that this was simply miscommunication, and then Simoni blew it out of proportion. You ever try talking to somebody when you're going 15 mph uphill?

Since they were both taking turns pulling I'd say that even though Simoni let up a little bit, he still may have benefited from collaborating on the earlier part of the climb after the descent.

As for the money, again, who would say that they are going to try to win the stage for their kid and then offer to give Simoni the win for money? That's just crazy talk.

Also, why did Simoni say one thing the night before and then mention this bribe thing the day after? It's very suspect if he says he thought the gift was implied when he paced Basso on the descent and then the next day says that Basso actually offered the gift for cash.

Why would Simoni think that Basso would want to give up a stage to collaborate? Basso has the jersey and 6+ minutes, so the only thing he could benefit from is another stage win.

We'll never really know what happened, so all this is possible of course, but I do have to question Simoni's story.
 

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I lost some respect for Simoni with those whiny comments. Sure, with Basso dominating the race like he did, makes one wonder, but don't air that out in the press.

As to the money/bribe offer: I can see someone who is in the lead making an offer like that, sort-of a good natured tongue-in-cheek taunt to one's opponent, but no athlete in Basso's position would make a serious offer like that if they had an ounce of brain in their head.
 

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I'm thinking the most likely explanation is a miscommunication; Basso's version of the "pact" was "we shouldn't take risks on the descent", while Simoni claims something like "please don't leave me on the descent", which are two rather different statements with different implications. I'm more inclined to believe Basso, as it doesn't seem to me that he;d have that much to gain by having Gibo pace him down the mountain; why imply that you'd trade a stage win for an escort on the descent? Nothing was at stake for Basso in GC, so what would he have to gain from this exchange?

As for the bribe thing, the only thing I could imagine would be as a joking taunt, which seems out of character for Basso, but what do I know what goes on between riders in the heat of a race? Stage winners get a (small) bonus anyway, and Basso is certainly making a pretty penny from CSC as well as numerous endorsments, so it seems far-fetched. As a handsome up-and-coming Giro winner with a new son, Basso is certianly winning in the court of public opinion, compared to the bitter has-been role Simoni has assumed.
 

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From Cyclingnews.com

Bad Vibes between Basso and Simoni mar Giro finale
By Tim Maloney, European Editor

More polemics happened on Sunday morning between maglia rosa Basso and Gibo Simoni. At the sign-in at the Museo di Ghisallo in Magreglio, Simoni commented to the media about Basso, "I don't want to take anything away from (Basso). He won because he was the strongest and if I had won (in Aprica) it would have been a gift. But when we were descending (the Mortirolo), he asked me not to drop him on the descent. Then 5km from Aprica, (Basso) asked me for money to let me win the stage. I'm not used to asking for charity and I said no."

Just as Simoni finished his accusations, Basso showed up at the sign-in and resplendent in his pink tunic, tried to work things out with the bitter, biting Simoni by extending his hand to shake with Simoni, but the Saunier Duval man spit out to Basso, "I don't accept your excuses."

The surprised Basso turned to the media and explained, "It's true that I asked (Simoni) to stay with me on the descent, but the rest is all false." But Simoni wasn't backing off his allegations that Basso tried to sell him the stage, saying to Basso with his trademark cold smile "Do you want me to say how much you asked for?", and then turned his back on Basso and moved away.

Clearly agitated, Basso then said to the assembled media, "I'm just not going to let anything ruin my day today. I think I've shown all during this Giro that I am the strongest. As I said, I did ask Simoni to stay with me on the descent, but for the rest of his filthy words, they are absolutely false."

After the Giro d'Italia podium presentation in Milano Sunday afternoon, both Basso and Simoni appeared on the post race broadcast but the chill was arctic between both Italians. "I realize that Basso was the strongest in this Giro, but that doesn't change anything. What happened (on Stage 20) cancels out his win for me." But Basso didn't react much to Simoni; in fact, he didn't even look at the Saunier Duval rider seated to his left. "This is a great day for me", he repeated. "I'm not letting anything spoil it."
 
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