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Not that I actually want this so dont chew me out for saying it but.... dont you think it would be strangely cool to see the roads dead empty and have free roam? Im sure we've all had non cyclists drop their jaw at the idea of even a ten mile ride. We could all make loads of money being delivery guys on bikes in the burbs. It would be like something out of a movie. Picture 8 foot bike racks in most of the parking spots at popular diners and stores. I just think it would be oddly cool. I mean really the gas "crisis" is our fault anyways. Europeans have been dealing with this for years by driving diesels and compacts.
We're the keeping up with the jones' idiots that oh so needed those 8000pound SUV's to drive our one kid to soccer practice at the mall. I mean really it does make sense, what if little johnny has a friend over? what would we do without a giant truck? how would people know that we're well off? it is so completely important. and besides all of those yaris', versa and civic cars are just so lame, right? 30 or 40miles a gallon and a brand new car for under $14,000? but we'd look like losers. and who wants to look like a loser?
I think the worst are the guys that dont do constuction or anything but bought a massive truck anyways. Ive got a friend with a ford f250 crewcab and absolutely nothing to haul in it. The funny part is that not only does it get 13mpg, he cant even sell it. because of gas prices its currently worth less than he owes on the stupid thing.... but hey, people must think he's doing well because his truck is large, right?
anywho i think it would also help for when the zombies take over.... moving all of those cars off the road would've been a drag anyways..... but thats a different thread so we'll talk about it later.
 

· Adorable Furry Hombre
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Nope.


Leave the bozos in their steel coffins---it keeps my MUT safer not having the masses of Squirrels who don't know how to drive cars suddenly now cycling-and not knowing how to do that either.
 

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It seems to me I'm seeing the same thing with SUV's as with the sub-prime melt down. More and more new SUV's on the road right now that are being driven probably by people who couldn't afford them otherwise and with no clue as to what will happen when gas goes to $8.00-$9.00 a gallon. Then they'll be crying for a govt. bail out.
 

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I with you!

Don't know how many club cab pickups I saw this weekend with only a driver and no load in the back.

There's not a gasoline suply crisis. Just a $$ "crisis".

Maybe we'll get some trucks off the road too if rail transportation starts making more sense. Then the highways will last 100 times longer.

I don't think any of us realize the price we're paying for these heavy trucks on our roads.
 

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Yea I couldnt agree more about the toll of trucks on our roads. Theres one specific intersection by my house that is the worst in this area. If you have a green light and try to go through the intersection at 50mph the car get dragged around in these 3 inch grooves from all the trucks stopping at the light over the years. It really is a problem tha most dont address. I think part of the truck problem is that when gas hit $3.30 or so last year all of the companies were blowing out pickups and suvs so people bought them figuring gas would go back down. I must admit that a brand new F150 for $9900 does seem pretty tempting but i knew the gas would only get worse. One of my friends just started a lawn company and this seems to be affecting him as well.... he actually needs his truck but the gas is so bad that he's had to turn down jobs because of the distance. When it costs you $10 just to get there and back plus gas for the mower and wear and tear on your equipment its not even worth it. That and the icecream man has been on the DL this year.
 

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An eerie ride

Yesterday I went out on a ride over a route that has one particular intersection and section of the road which normally has very much traffic. They are doing some construction on the road and this might have something to do with it. It was really weird as there was almost no traffic along here. It definitely felt weird riding along this stretch of road without having cars pass within a couple of feet of me. I could only hope that this was because of gas prices and that this would continue. I'm sure it won't however...
 

· Failboat Captian
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Threads like this pop up all the time. I used to always argee that >$10/gal gas would be great. But seeing what it has done to the price of everything else, I don't see the benefits as much. You aren't going to haul a 50 foot semi trailer with a bike. Then again, maybe they'd start building more efficient diesel-electric trucks and using trains more for long hauls.

That said, I have 4 kids, so I actually do need a vehicle with a 3rd row. The minivan is better than a Suburban, but still drinks a bit of fuel. But we only put about 4000 miles a year on it. Expensive gas would put an end to my skiing career.

What I'd really like to see is the state and local gov'ts put a lot more money into bike lanes and MUTs. I really think that if you give people a safe way to travel by bike, a lot more people would.
 

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B15serv said:
dont you think it would be strangely cool to see the roads dead empty and have free roam?
Go for a ride on Christmas morning... it is AWESOME. My dad and I have made this a tradition. The entire family gets up early on Christmas- like 6:30am, and come 8:00am we are all sitting around so my dad and I go for a 25 mile ride.

You have total roam on the roads, I play going in and out of the dotted line on a 4 lane road that is normally swamped with cars. (You can see a mile in both directions, so I know nothing is coming.)
 

· eminence grease
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mohair_chair said:
I can't wait to quit my engineering job to make loads of money being a delivery guy on a bike in the burbs.
When you find a headhunter who specializes in those jobs, would you pass their name on to me? I'd really appreciate it. Being a bike delivery boy in the 'burbs has been a goal of mine since I don't know when.
 

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Kestreljr said:
You have total roam on the roads, I play going in and out of the dotted line on a 4 lane road that is normally swamped with cars. (You can see a mile in both directions, so I know nothing is coming.)
Now that does sound sweet!

I personally wish we lived in a less motorized country.
The way it is, I love your idea about riding on Christmas.
 

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I think wishing for anything such thing is a moot point- it will happen eventually or we will run out of oil, but it will be one of the two, that much is certain.

In many ways, I think rising fuel costs may turn out to be a good thing in the long run if it gets more people cycling or at least being conscious of their driving habits and buying fuel-efficient cars. It will probably also spur people to grow their own food and buy locally. Big grocery stores that rely on shipping food all the way across the country will go out of business as people begin to buy from local growers and producers. The consequences of high fuel costs may not be convenient, but they will be healthier and greener. For far too long "convenience" has been thrown around as a buzzword without anyone ever thinking about if the benefits of convenience are worth the costs.

Obviously, a lot of people will see a drop in their standard of living, some people will lose their jobs, and companies will go out of business, and that's unfortunate. But no one ever got anything worthwhile without sacrificing something for it. It won't be the end of the world.
 

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I have a different perspective. We rarely use our car. We live in Europe, and gas is already $10-12 gallon. But it isn't economics--- but rather need. We are active, I love biking to work--- and there is enough retail in walking distance that we rarely "need" a car.

The trouble is, I fly 50,000 miles per year. I have to travel for work, and my family lives back in the US. There really isn't much alternative to air travel.

My point is there is much more to the price of "gas" than regular driving patterns.
 

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Cross Chained said:
It will probably also spur people to grow their own food and buy locally. Big grocery stores that rely on shipping food all the way across the country will go out of business as people begin to buy from local growers and producers.
This is a great thought if you live somewhere that doesn't have winter. If you live in, say, Wisconsin, shipping food is kind of a necessity 4-6 months out of the year. Personally, I like oranges and pineapple and all kinds of seafoods that don't grow locally. I love my local farmer's market- it's one of the best in the country- but it only happens April-early November, and let's face it, up here, april and may are pretty much a wash for veggies, and same with October and November.

Then, there's getting to work, getting my daughter to daycare, and all those other things that I kinda need a car for sometimes- you can't take an infant to daycare in a bike trailer when it's 20 below. And while I was able to commute to work 2 or 3 times a week all winter, we got over 100 inches of snow this year, and not many people can/will really ride in that kind of weather. I know my 70 year old next door neighbor would have problems getting around in the winter without a car...
 

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logansites said:
Bike prices are supposed to go up 20% next year. How much does that have to do with the oil crisis?
A lot less than it relates to the dollar losing value...

it costs the same to make a part in japan this year as it did last year, but the dollar is worth considerably less, so it takes more dollars to get the same parts.
 

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buck-50 said:
This is a great thought if you live somewhere that doesn't have winter. If you live in, say, Wisconsin, shipping food is kind of a necessity 4-6 months out of the year. Personally, I like oranges and pineapple and all kinds of seafoods that don't grow locally. I love my local farmer's market- it's one of the best in the country- but it only happens April-early November, and let's face it, up here, april and may are pretty much a wash for veggies, and same with October and November.

Then, there's getting to work, getting my daughter to daycare, and all those other things that I kinda need a car for sometimes- you can't take an infant to daycare in a bike trailer when it's 20 below. And while I was able to commute to work 2 or 3 times a week all winter, we got over 100 inches of snow this year, and not many people can/will really ride in that kind of weather. I know my 70 year old next door neighbor would have problems getting around in the winter without a car...
I know all about winter- I grew up in Minnesota. :)

But with refrigeration, it is much easier to store food and some produce could also be grown in local greenhouses. People used to get all their food locally and they managed without having all the technology that we have today. I'm not saying it would be convenient and maybe you wouldn't get to eat the kinds of foods you like best all year round, but you certainly would not starve to death.

As far as commuting, I'm hopeful that the current oil problems might spur more cities to invest in good transit services. For example, I live in a major city (about 1 million people in the metro area) that only has a few lame bus lines. No one rides the bus because it sucks. However, we also have minimal sidewalks, no bike lanes... people are forced to drive, essentially. But I think cities need to spend less on stupid things *coughfootballstadiumscough* and more on transit systems. Subways, light rail trains, efficient bus lines with commuter routes, stuff like that. All of Europe has these things- there is no reason we should be so far behind in this country. No one uses public transit because it is horribly slow and inconvenient, but I think if people were forced out of their cars, the political climate would change enough that cities would act.

Personally, I do not commute on a bike. I drive. Biking for me is just recreational. I would never feel safe riding on city streets or leaving my bike outside on a rack to get stolen or broken. I don't have a problem with cars and I understand that sometimes they are the best form of transportation. But I think we could be a lot less wasteful and it would be nice to see people only use cars for longer and occasional trips, instead of daily commuting.
 

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buck-50 said:
A lot less than it relates to the dollar losing value...

it costs the same to make a part in japan this year as it did last year, but the dollar is worth considerably less, so it takes more dollars to get the same parts.
Isn't this a small part of the reason gasoline prices are up? Dollar worth less when puchasing foreign oil?
 

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Cross Chained said:
I know all about winter- I grew up in Minnesota. :)

But with refrigeration, it is much easier to store food and some produce could also be grown in local greenhouses. People used to get all their food locally and they managed without having all the technology that we have today. I'm not saying it would be convenient and maybe you wouldn't get to eat the kinds of foods you like best all year round, but you certainly would not starve to death.

As far as commuting, I'm hopeful that the current oil problems might spur more cities to invest in good transit services. For example, I live in a major city (about 1 million people in the metro area) that only has a few lame bus lines. No one rides the bus because it sucks. However, we also have minimal sidewalks, no bike lanes... people are forced to drive, essentially. But I think cities need to spend less on stupid things *coughfootballstadiumscough* and more on transit systems. Subways, light rail trains, efficient bus lines with commuter routes, stuff like that. All of Europe has these things- there is no reason we should be so far behind in this country. No one uses public transit because it is horribly slow and inconvenient, but I think if people were forced out of their cars, the political climate would change enough that cities would act.

Personally, I do not commute on a bike. I drive. Biking for me is just recreational. I would never feel safe riding on city streets or leaving my bike outside on a rack to get stolen or broken. I don't have a problem with cars and I understand that sometimes they are the best form of transportation. But I think we could be a lot less wasteful and it would be nice to see people only use cars for longer and occasional trips, instead of daily commuting.
I know my city is starting to work on a better public transit infrastructure, but it takes time. If there's commuter rail in 10 years, I'll be impressed.

Here's the thing about comparisons with europe- europe has a couple reasons for having good public transit systems that America just hasn't had to deal with- First, europe has a lot more population in a smaller space than we do. Second, Most of Europe was laid out before the car was invented. Finally, Much of Europe was leveled in WW1 and WW2, leaving the citizens dirt poor and in need of public transit systems to get around.

It'll take a while for us to learn to drive less, and it'll take a while for our government and private industry to get around to getting us decent mass transit. But, it'll happen.
 
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