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Just checked Eric House's Fix Me Up site to select a gear size- trying to avoid buying a bunch of cogs. I'd like to duplicate a 42-17 setup which is what I see a lot of people using. Something in the mid 60s range. Here's the rub.

I like big rings and I can not lie...

It's just an aesthetic thing. I've found that for my frame's chainstay length, I have some options that allow me to use a 48 or even 52 or 53 ring rather than a 42. I own all four already, so it saves me the cost of a new ring. I've gotta buy a cog anyhow, so a 21 or 22 is no better or worse than a 17 or 18 pricewise. My question is this: Does a given gearing "feel" the same regardless of the ring combinations? Thanks in advance.
 

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same

Auriaprottu said:
Just checked Eric House's Fix Me Up site to select a gear size- trying to avoid buying a bunch of cogs. I'd like to duplicate a 42-17 setup which is what I see a lot of people using. Something in the mid 60s range. Here's the rub.

I like big rings and I can not lie...

It's just an aesthetic thing. I've found that for my frame's chainstay length, I have some options that allow me to use a 48 or even 52 or 53 ring rather than a 42. I own all four already, so it saves me the cost of a new ring. I've gotta buy a cog anyhow, so a 21 or 22 is no better or worse than a 17 or 18 pricewise. My question is this: Does a given gearing "feel" the same regardless of the ring combinations? Thanks in advance.
Should feel the same. I don't think your legs can tell the difference. I think on a very esoteric scale, larger rings have less friction, as the chain bends at less acute angles, and more teeth means the teeth should last longer. There are fewer cogs from which to choose in the larger sizes, though. Oh, and larger weighs more, of course!

Doug
 

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oh, and

DougSloan said:
Should feel the same. I don't think your legs can tell the difference. I think on a very esoteric scale, larger rings have less friction, as the chain bends at less acute angles, and more teeth means the teeth should last longer. There are fewer cogs from which to choose in the larger sizes, though. Oh, and larger weighs more, of course!

Doug
Eric's is a cool site, but this might allow you to see more possibilities all at once:

http://www.midcalracing.com/gears.xls
 

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Welll...

[QUOTE=
My question is this: Does a given gearing "feel" the same regardless of the ring combinations?

Yes it does...gear inches=gear inches.

And, as far as ratio is concerned, you might want to reconsider your options.

The larger the cog/ring combo, the more force you're putting on the hub threads. Also, the smaller the size of ring and cog (min.16T), the shorter your chain will be, the smoother your drivetrain will run, the more even the forces will be distributed and the longer the parts will last.

JMO...and a smidge of physics.

PH
 
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