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I just started riding on an indoor trainer (an Elite Hydroforce+ Fluid). I have noticed that I have a hard time elevating my HR to onroad ride levels. This is for the same cadence and speed in both mediums. To get my HR to outdoor ride levels while I'm on the trainer takes a lot more perceived effort.
Is this a common thing?
Also, it seems a lot harder to spin at higher cadences (95-110 rpm) on the trainer than when I'm on the road....even in the lowest gearing. What gives? Is this common to indoor trainer riding, too?
Any thoughts or sugestions....could it be I set the trainer up incorrectly? I did follow the instructions. Just frustrating that I can't even get anywhere near a roadride-like experience. Does every/anyone else have this situation?
Sorry for the rambling...I don't post very often as I can usually find answers to my ?'s by scrolling thru existing threads or by doing a search. This one eludes me.
 

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Yup

I've never been able to get a "true road" feel from a trainer adn I'v had a few. As far as teh cadence goes, I've felt the same thing. The nice part is that once you are on the road I end up spinning faster. I haven't felt any of the lower heart rate and the perceived effort is about the same. My legs seem to burn more inside than out, but I breath heavier outside, so the effort is reasonably the same. Anyway, didn't really answer much of your question, but just thought I'd relate.
 

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Lack of momentum, and the fact that the force stays on while you're over the top makes it a bit tougher. Buck it up and get on it, your spin will adapt after a few weeks.

I have problems reaching my wattage targets compared to outside (10% loss).
 

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I find that it hurts just about the same as when I'm on the road. The speed, cadence, effort, and the pain levels are equal to outside riding. The only difference is that inside, there is nothing to take your mind off this pain.
 

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indoor pain

I agree with grumpy - i have no problem kicking my own a$$ on the trainer, but it takes serious focus. I'm implying that you are not serious, but inside with no hills, headwinds, etc, you need to provide the mental effort. meaning, can you really put your bike in its lowest gear and run at 100rpm for an hour, or do intervals at 25mph at 110? if so, and your HR is not getting up there, then your trainer is not giving you enough resistance.


MR_GRUMPY said:
I find that it hurts just about the same as when I'm on the road. The speed, cadence, effort, and the pain levels are equal to outside riding. The only difference is that inside, there is nothing to take your mind off this pain.
 

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OverTheHill said:
Any thoughts or sugestions....could it be I set the trainer up incorrectly?
You gotta tighten up the roller so it touches the tire :)


temperature may play a factor. a cold room might take you longer to warm up. it typically takes a few mins more to warm up for me, but i find it about the same as on the road. i have no problem doing LT intervals, VO2 intervals, & getting my HR way up there.
 

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OverTheHill said:
To get my HR to outdoor ride levels while I'm on the trainer takes a lot more perceived effort.
Is this a common thing?
Very common. It's not your equipment's fault, though. It's your brain. Stuck in one place, staring at a wall (or maybe a TV), you cannot push yourself like you can out on a group ride with the bro's. It takes a lot of practice to condition your mind to be able to reach similar targets indoors as outdoors.

A power meter is very helpful in knowing whether you are actually doing the work. HR is a lagging and frequently inaccurate indicator.

Another way to make sure you work hard is to ride a trainer with others. I host a weekly trainer "group ride" in my garage in the winter, where we do an interval program. Much easier to stay on the gas when the people who I invite over are all there to see me wimp out. Also consider a group computrainer class if anyone in your area offers one.

If you haven't already, make sure you have a big a$$ed fan (or two or three) blowing on you. Cooling on the trainer is the hardest thing to get right, and I've yet to find I had too much airflow.

Trainer workouts really are the best way to get a focused workout when you've got a compressed (or oddball) schedule. But you need to get used to how they feel.
 
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