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Ok so I just got a new road bike (my first "real" road bike) and the day I got it, I rode it quite a bit further than I normally do. I'm not gonna say exactly how far, cause I know it wouldn't be that far for a lot of people on here, but for me, it was pretty far. So anyway, the next few days, the muscle in the upper part of my leg was sore. Like... the one between the knee and the hip bone? Sorry, I'm not sure what it's called. So then yesterday, it was still fairly sore and as I was lifting my left leg up to get outa the car, it started hurting way worse. But this morning, both legs feel fine. So I guess my question is did I screw something up? Is this normal? and what should I do?
 

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Musculo Med Doc
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93 Posts
It sounds as if you might have been recently acquainted with a form of what we call Spring Knee! Although, felt normally at the knee cap - yours sounds to be located in the muscle that passes over the knee cap. Something that most of us have come across at some point (and still do to some large regard) is over doing it too soon!

A few things that you might watch for:

1) Try to keep your increase in activity to approx. 10% or so per week. That should give much of the soft tissue structure & joints the needed time to accommodate for the new stress & strain put on them

2) One that is often overlooked - the need for a higher cadence. When people begin to get in to riding, they very commonly push a bigger - harder gear, vs. an easier gear w/greater turnover. A good starting point might be to try and stay above 80 rpm - Of particular importance when climbing!

3) Make sure to stretch - after your ride. And with that, stretch the muscles that need it the most. A fitness professional should be able to assist you with that one, if need be.
 

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welcome to the world of DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness). Sore quads are part of cycling - you should dig around to make sure you've got your seatpost height and fore/aft adjusted OK along with cleat placement (Steve Hogg's recommendations over at cyclingnews.com work well for many) as improper adjustment of these can cause injury and/or load some muscles more than others. Read also about nutrition after a ride to help recovery.
 

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Musculo Med Doc
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hmmm.....

.....as from the description of the inury, it sounds like MWPDX is describing a unilateral condition (could be wrong, and if so please state.... it might make a difference with the info you get from other posts). If in fact that is the case, the likely hood that someone would experience DOMS and then present with such complaints would be very unlikely. DOMS, as it is associated with cycling - more often than not, would present with a Bilateral complaint. Had this been something like paddling, or skiing - activities in which it is easier to truly favor one side of the body much more so than the other, I'd be thinking DOMS too.

Regardless, of the actuality - if it is a bit of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), see my post pertaining to bullet number 3. Arguably, one of the very few things that might have been shown in research, to reduce DOMS.
 
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