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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought an SRAM Rival groupset which I am setting-up.

I have looked through the online videos and the instructions but I cannot work-out how to install the cable housings.

There is a thinner cable on each lever for the gears.
There is a thicker cable on each lever for the brakes.

There are two black cable housings supplied with the group.
These cable housings are both the same length however one is thicker than the other.
The thicker housing has caps on each end which seem to be fixed.
The thinner cable has removable caps on each end with x4 additional caps for a total of x6 caps.

I think the thinner cable with the x6 caps is the one used for the thicker brake cables?
Then the thicker cable with the fixed caps on each end is just cut in half and used with the thinner gear cables. After cutting it in half, then one side is used for the front derailleur and the other for the rear derailleur. The fixed cap sits against the cable guide on the frame whilst the other uncapped end pushed up against the lever and tucked under the bar tape.

The groupset also has three little cable protective rubbers to protect the frame. But there will be 3 cables which might rub the frame ... the rear brake, the front derailleur and the rear derailleur. Where do I put the little rubber protectors?
 

· No Crybabies
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help?

I'll try to put this delicately -- by the questions you are asking, I'm guessing your skills might not be quite up to the task. I'd suggest getting some help or taking it to a shop.

Nonetheless, the thinner cables and housing are for the shifters, and the thicker ones for the brakes. You'll likely have to cut the housing and cables to fit your bike as you have it set up.

You really want to get this right, both from a functional and safety perspective. There are some tools and techniques that will make it a better job, too.

If you still really want to try it yourself, post again, and we'll try to walk you through it.
 

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I agree with Fixed....but....if you are so inclined to do this yourself without a friend/shop/etc. helping you the Parktools.com site and the book by Leonard Zinn on maintenance should become your new best friends. Read first, then read again, then print a copy and take it with you to your garage.

Once you are giving it a go, post individual questions and I bet we can help walk you through it...

Zach
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

The brake housing has a fixed cap at each end (I have tried pulling it off but it is quite firmly fixed). After cutting, is this cap intended to butt into the brake arm?
 

· NeoRetroGrouch
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sml said:
Thanks guys.

The brake housing has a fixed cap at each end (I have tried pulling it off but it is quite firmly fixed). After cutting, is this cap intended to butt into the brake arm?
Things still don't sound right. You should have a pair of thick cables and a pair of thin cables. The thick ones are for the brakes. Try to insert one of the thick cables into each of the pieces of housing. If it fits, it's brake; if not, it's shifter. I'm guessing the double ended one is for the rear derailleur. - TF
 

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TurboTurtle said:
Things still don't sound right. You should have a pair of thick cables and a pair of thin cables. The thick ones are for the brakes. Try to insert one of the thick cables into each of the pieces of housing. If it fits, it's brake; if not, it's shifter. I'm guessing the double ended one is for the rear derailleur. - TF
Another way to distinguish shifter cable housings (thinner) from brake cable housings (thicker) is the type/pattern of metal exposed at the ends of the housings. Many shifter cable housing have reinforcing wires that are generally parallel to the length of the housing, either between the inner & outer plastic layers or embedded in one of them (usually the inner layer, I think). The metal layer in brake housings is much more robust, with the metal layer formed as a coiled strip of metal.

Under the tension of braking, it's theoretically possible for a brake cable to push through the parallel wire layer of a shifter housing... which would be a very bad thing because your braking control would end.

You will need a pair of bicycle cable cutters to do this job correctly. Few normal wire cutters will give you the clean cuts that you'll want to do the job properly.

Have fun!
 

· Steaming piles of opinion
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Thick housing is for brakes.

Thin housing is for shifters.

Cut appropriate lengths from each end to reach from shifters to cable stops. Done correctly, you'll have enough in the middle to add two ferrules to create a noodle for the rear derailler.

I prefer to use the fixed end against the shifter: Otherwise, there's a tendency for a ferrule to get jammed un there when time comes for replacement.

Usually, brake cables don't have ferrules at the bar end. The loose ferrules are for the rear brake noodle.

As for bumpers, use them where you need them. On my setup, that was for the shift cables at the head tube, and the rear brake noodle. Rear brake at head tube swings clear. That all depends on the lengths of cables and positions of stops.

hope it helps.
 

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PdxMark said:
Another way to distinguish shifter cable housings (thinner) from brake cable housings (thicker) is the type/pattern of metal exposed at the ends of the housings. Many shifter cable housing have reinforcing wires that are generally parallel to the length of the housing, either between the inner & outer plastic layers or embedded in one of them (usually the inner layer, I think). The metal layer in brake housings is much more robust, with the metal layer formed as a coiled strip of metal.

Under the tension of braking, it's theoretically possible for a brake cable to push through the parallel wire layer of a shifter housing... which would be a very bad thing because your braking control would end.

You will need a pair of bicycle cable cutters to do this job correctly. Few normal wire cutters will give you the clean cuts that you'll want to do the job properly.

Have fun!
And the parallel wires of the shift housing is more precise, with no compression losses that the coiled bits can have.

A Dremel with a composite cutoff wheel does a fine job of cutting cable and housing - better, in my mind, than the purpose-built tool. One hint no matter the tool: insert a bit of cable far enough that it's at the point of the cut. It'll keep from crushing the housing, which is much preferred to opening it up later. I'd only use a spare cable rather than the 'live' material to avoid mistakes.

Oh, and make sure the ends of your cuts are perfectly square. Small bits of angle are responsible for many complaints of 'mushy' brakes and sloppy shifting.[edited]
 

· RoadBikeRider
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danl1...I like the idea of putting an old piece of inner wire in the housing before cutting. I always cut and then have to open up the end of the housing with a pointy tool. You meant sloppy shifting didn't you??
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Hi guys. I am almost there and it is making sense.

I will re-phrase a question to hopefully make things simpler ....

Where do the fixed ferrule caps on the brake cable go? They dont seem to fit in the lever, so the only other place is the brake arm or the frame lug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Good news ... I have been able to answer my own question ... the black aluminium fixed ferrule on the brake cables inserts into the levers. It is a very tight fit but it does eventually squeeze in there!

Thanks guys. Easy from now on!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Fixed said:
I'll try to put this delicately -- by the questions you are asking, I'm guessing your skills might not be quite up to the task. I'd suggest getting some help or taking it to a shop.
Easy .. all done with your help and a little googling. Nothing is really hard with the internet.
 

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andulong said:
danl1...I like the idea of putting an old piece of inner wire in the housing before cutting. I always cut and then have to open up the end of the housing with a pointy tool. You meant sloppy shifting didn't you??
D'oH!

Fixed.
 
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