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I'm noticing that more and more bikes come with integrated seatposts. I like the idea of removing the weak point (flex, sinking post, twisting) of the post. However, I find that from time to time I need to adjust the height of my seatpost. Can an integrated post do this? Also, how do I get the assurance that I'll have a post that is "exactly" the correct height?
 

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Do you really suspect a bike company would be dumb enough to sell a bike with a seat post that can't be adjusted?

Yes every one I've seen can be adjusted. You won't have as much up/down as a traditional post but unless you shrink or grown it's plenty.

Spacers come in small enough and different sizes to pin point exactly where you want it.
 

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Hank Stamper said:
Do you really suspect a bike company would be dumb enough to sell a bike with a seat post that can't be adjusted?
In a word, Yes. And no, it isn't "dumb" either. It is actually quite clever. One way of putting a stop to the used bike market.
 

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There are usually a few cms of play in the system. Many models might require you to cut the seatmast to a specific height based on your usual saddle height, hence Marc's comment about undermining the used bike market. Once it is cut, you can only make it shorter, limiting the pool of buyers.
 

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TiCoyote said:
How do you cut it? Pipe cutter? Hack saw? Just have the lbs do it?
Depends on what material the frame is. So, possibly yes to all of those. Unless you have a fully stocked tool kit, with cutting guides and such, I'd probably consult with your lbs and have them do it and figure out what the proper length is, based on your measurements and preferences.
 

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TiCoyote said:
How do you cut it? Pipe cutter? Hack saw? Just have the lbs do it?
I'd have the LBS do it. If by chance you screw it up-what'll it cost to make it right, versus paying a reputable LBS who will warranty their work?

I still question seeing "more and more" seatmast frames. From what I've seen they made a splash and have been fading away, as the benefits are negligible in addition to the added difficulty of selling the frame.
 

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TiCoyote said:
How do you cut it? Pipe cutter? Hack saw? Just have the lbs do it?
My Look came with a cutting guide and a bag full of spacers. You could get about 3cm of additional height using them.

Cutting it was far simpler than it was scary, I measured about 8 times, cut it a bit long and then cut it a second time (after measureing 8 more times) to the proper height using the bare minimum of spacers which gave me the utmost in future flexibility.
 

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I've only really checked out Looks and Museauw and the information that it can only go down after cut and that it ties you to one saddle is incorrect with those, and I suspect others.

Here's a link that explains how Look does it.
http://bikehugger.com/2008/07/the-look-epost-integrated-seat.html

Of course you need to be in the ballpack when you cut it but as long as you're experienced enough to have a clue about your saddle height and are fully grown there's shouldn't be a concern about making small adjustments in either direction.
 

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olr1 said:
It does tie you in to using one type of saddle; different saddles have differing heights from rails to top, so when you cut you need to be sure it's the saddle for you....
So wrong that it's laughable...
...and the reason you don't measure to the rails...stop reading magazines!

EVERY seatmast bike offers some degree of adjustment for seat height. I have a Ridley Helium and have changed saddle 4 times in the past 6 months, trying to find one I like best.
Putting in, or removing, an alu shim takes (literally) 30 seconds.

All do it differently, but all give you flexibility. Hell, I have two completely different mast caps for my Ridley so I can adjust seatback, height and STA.

Funny how people who have never seen or touched, much less ridden or owned, a seatmast frameset have all of the opinions.:mad2:
 

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backinthesaddle said:
So wrong that it's laughable...
...and the reason you don't measure to the rails...stop reading magazines!

EVERY seatmast bike offers some degree of adjustment for seat height. I have a Ridley Helium and have changed saddle 4 times in the past 6 months, trying to find one I like best.
Putting in, or removing, an alu shim takes (literally) 30 seconds.

All do it differently, but all give you flexibility. Hell, I have two completely different mast caps for my Ridley so I can adjust seatback, height and STA.

Funny how people who have never seen or touched, much less ridden or owned, a seatmast frameset have all of the opinions.:mad2:
Not laughable at all. Different saddles do have very different heights and configurations. I ride a Ridley Noah with two different 'mast heads'. I know about different saddles because I went through my whole box of them again with the Noah. Every one required a whole different fitting process and I ended up with different "shim-stacks" to get comfortable and effective with different saddles. The Noah has, at least, a symetrical seat mast that allows you to reverse the hardware (mast head? Saddle clamp?) and get a rider forward position similar to a TT or Triathlon frame. I use my Noah as my TT frame for long TTs and it works well indeed.

But indeed, you will have more trouble re-selling an integrated seat post frame. You can not make one that's been cut down for a short guy fit a bigger guy...You will have to sell to someone with lots of re-assurances and measurments. The one thing that you can't really nail down when you measure saddle height is 'where' on the saddle to measure "to".
Saddles are usually at an angle to the seat tube and just a few millimeters of varation in the angle you hold the tape will result in a difference in measured pedal to seat height...The flex in a saddle (different in different brands) will also make you want a different height....

I think my Noah has about 3/4 " of adjustment only...sufficient for just one rider...but not for all possible riders. Example...both my SO and I ride Ridley frames..she has an Excaliber size M and my Noah is a M too...but she runs her saddle about 1 1/2 below where I ride mine...So I can ride her bike by raising the seatpost but she can't ride mine at all...too long in the seat mast for her...I'm at the top of the range for the Ridley M and she is at the smaller end for that frame's sizing...

I doubt I will want another integrated seat post frame...It works well, but so does my CX-1 Colnago frame and I don't have the restrictions with a normal frame.
 

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Gnarly 928 said:
Not laughable at all. Different saddles do have very different heights and configurations. I ride a Ridley Noah with two different 'mast heads'. I know about different saddles because I went through my whole box of them again with the Noah. Every one required a whole different fitting process and I ended up with different "shim-stacks" to get comfortable and effective with different saddles. The Noah has, at least, a symetrical seat mast that allows you to reverse the hardware (mast head? Saddle clamp?) and get a rider forward position similar to a TT or Triathlon frame. I use my Noah as my TT frame for long TTs and it works well indeed.

Want to take a mulligan? He said that being tied into one saddle was laughable and you pretty much gave case study showing it is.
 

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I've been working with a Look 586 frame and the integrated post actually has a lot of adjustability, using all the various spacers provided. I picked up another e-Post (off eBay) that doesn't use any elastomer at all, so sits at least a full cm lower (but no doubt wouldn't offer as cushy a ride).

I also have another e-Post "R5" that uses a different mounting for the seat, which can be reversed upside down to lower the seat more than a cm. The R5 has little setback... Look also offers the R30, which has more setback but uses the same seat attachment method.

The R5 and R30 are mostly used with Look's TT and mountain bikes... but fit and work on the road frames with integrated seatpost just fine, too. I have no idea what the e-Post without any elastomer was used on originally. Maybe an earlier version of the 595.

Finally, Look also offers a "Re-Post" that's specifically for bikes which have had the seatmast cut short. It is highly adjustable, just like a standard seat post. I don't think it has the elastomers, though. I haven't used a Re-Post personally.

Park Tools makes a cutting guide. Several in fact... the largest one is what's needed for seat posts. It's made of metal. The guide that Look provides with their frames is plastic or nylon, so not as reusable.
 

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TiCoyote said:
I'm noticing that more and more bikes come with integrated seatposts. I like the idea of removing the weak point (flex, sinking post, twisting) of the post. However, I find that from time to time I need to adjust the height of my seatpost. Can an integrated post do this? Also, how do I get the assurance that I'll have a post that is "exactly" the correct height?
Like some answered already, they can be adjustable.

I personally think it is a pretty good design feature, especially on carbon frames where they tend to have slipping or clamping issues. LOOK and TIME have a good system and some custom builders use them too.

The idea of limiting a bike choice for easy resale is something I never consider anyways and find those comments foolish. Even if you do decide to sell it, the ISP bike will fit a potential buyer just as easily as a regular set up.
 
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