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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am looking at building a TT bike. I have looked at several major manufacturer frames as well as the "cheap" carbon frames (including the two sticky threads here).

My question is this. If I have the option between two almost identical frames and the main difference is integrated seatpost or non-isp, how do I decide?

Thanks
 

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merckxman
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The big issues that are mentioned with ISPs are cutting it, re-sale problems, getting it in a bike case for travel.

Those were not things I was concerned about so I went ahead and purchased one.

Some ISP systems seem better than others as far as adjustability so that might be something for you to consider in your purchase.
 

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if you get something you arn't intend to sell (such as a ebay noname), i would go for the version I prefer. I have seen some frame manufactures makes thier ISP compatible with traditional seat posts, so if it's cut the post to short it's just to cut it in line with the toptube and put traditional seatpost in the frame with a collar and race it like a non-isp version.

i purchased an isp myself a week or two ago. the weightsaving is low, if any weight saving but for me the look is as well important.

there is some nice seat clamp options available for the aftermarket for isp, such as tune Cappy.. I will go for a custom made < 60g my self
 

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old school drop out
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What's the advantage of having an integrated post?
- a tiny weight savings

The disadvantage?
- you'll have a lot of trouble selling your bike in the future
- you'll not be able to lend your bike to a friend

What's more important to you? To me, unless you are a pro that gets free bikes an integrated post makes little sense.
 

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laffeaux said:
What's the advantage of having an integrated post?
- a tiny weight savings (not really, when you include the mast head)

The disadvantage?
- you'll have a lot of trouble selling your bike in the future
(not everyone sells a bike they buy. Even then, ISPs give you a pretty large adjustment factor for seat height. If you bought the correct size to begin with, it's a non-issue)
- you'll not be able to lend your bike to a friend
(really? I ride a $6000 bike. It's not getting lent out, period! I'd sooner let you grope my wife.)

What's more important to you? To me, unless you are a pro that gets free bikes an integrated post makes little sense.
(spoken like someone who has never dealt with an ISP frame.)

see above...
ISP bikes are nearly as easy to set up as regular non-ISP bikes, and certain 'issues' are moot points, at best.
 

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stubek said:
So, I am looking at building a TT bike. I have looked at several major manufacturer frames as well as the "cheap" carbon frames (including the two sticky threads here).

My question is this. If I have the option between two almost identical frames and the main difference is integrated seatpost or non-isp, how do I decide?

Thanks
ISP's look much cooler :thumbsup: AND they add 10MPH to your average speed :D
 

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ISP's aren't there to save weight. They are there to stiffen the frame and to make response consistent from bike to bike within a particular model.
But they greatly reduce fitting flexibility.
 

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the only real issue is travel - if you put your frame in a case for air travel. ISP on larger size frames may not fit...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
backinsthesaddle,
I agree with your comment. I don't lend out my bike or my wife. I don't even let my wife touch my bikes!

I do travel a little with my road bike for races. I don't see doing that with the TT bike, but it is something to keep in mind.

I am torn between a good deal on a Fuji D-6 from the local Fuji rep (but it is SRAM rival) or building an FM018 that can be mostly Red and weigh 2 pounds less for about the same cost with one of the "cheap" frames.

I am going to go measure the D-6 tomorrow and see if it will fit in my case.
 

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stubek said:
backinsthesaddle,
I agree with your comment. I don't lend out my bike ... I don't even let my wife touch my bikes!
Wow. It's just a bike. I lend others my bikes regularly. None of my bikes cost $6000, but I'll gladly let most of my buddies ride any of my bikes
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
laffequx,
My road bike is a Scott CR1 Pro that I have had for a few years and upgraded to the point that is is about 15.5 pounds and set for me, so two reasons I don't want to lend it out are that I don't want to adjust it for others than back for me and the wheels alone are about $2k and I have probably spent about $8k on the bike over the last 3-4 years including the purchase.

I honestly don't know anyone who loans out their bike, at least not their primary machines, but to each his own
 

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Trek2.3 said:
ISP's aren't there to save weight. They are there to stiffen the frame and to make response consistent from bike to bike within a particular model.
But they greatly reduce fitting flexibility.
Again, they DO NOT reduce fitting flexibility. If you can do simple math, handle a measuring tape, and have ordered the correct size frame, fitting an ISP is no different.
ALL ISP bikes offer enough flexibility to account for changes in position and saddles.

How do I know? I ride a Ridley Helium and have set up several ISP bikes for people. It's not rocket science.
 

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I do not agree that ISPs provide flexibility in fitting. They may be fine if you don't have the seat set back far, but many riders are forced to use seatposts with more than normal offset to get the seat where they want it. The choice in "seatposts"/top caps for ISPs isn't anywhere near as great, assuming there is any choice at all; for some frames there is none.

OTOH, for a TT frame where the seatpost is likely to be well forward this isn't an issue. However, in my case, I will be avoiding ISPs for all the reasons mentioned - except lending my bike! (That's always a bad idea.)
 

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With TT bikes especially loaning or renting is very common, especially among elite amateurs and low level pro's. Many of the stage races at this level will include a TT, but generally the 5 or 6 times a season this might be necessary isn't enough to justify the added cost. So there is a lot of bike swapping going on.
 
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