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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in getting a new bike, since what I have now just isn't going to cut it, given that it's from the 80s and has down tube shifters.

One I've been interested in is a Cannondale CAAD10. I'm looking to invest a wee bit more into the frame, given that it's something I'll want to be keeping for a while. I'm definitely sticking with alloy, no carbon.

I tested a CAAD10 recently and it felt pretty amazing, that is, compared to my current bike. My main concerns are weight, aerodynamic positioning (most bikes seem to be okay with this in terms of the frame) and reliable shifting. So, 105 seems like the way to go, unless Tiagra has no known issues.

My main question is if there's anything cheaper I might be okay racing on in terms if the Cannondale is maybe only offering some small diminishing returns.
 

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Since you asked . . . shop around, get the best bike you can afford, and then train your ass off. It's pretty hard for someone to make fun of your bike when you just rode them off your wheel.
 

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The CAAD 10 is a great bang for the buck bike. Get it with 105 and you can make upgrades as you need or want them. 105 is totally race ready, you might save weight or gain some ergonomics with higher end stuff, but the gains would be marginal. Don't buy anything that you'd be afraid to crash, it's eventually going to happen.
 

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CAAD10 with 105 is absolutely race worthy. You'll be in good company with lots of racers on exactly that rig. Unlike some aluminum rigs from years ago, perfectly fine for long training days or century rides, too. And as BigBill said, not the end of the financial world if crashed and frame or parts have to be replaced.
 

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I race Masters CAT 1/2/3 on a CAAD10 frame (with SRAM Rival) and it works great. I'm not really giving up anything of major consequence to others with nicer bikes since I also run 58mm Carbon Tubulars when I race, which brings the weight of the bike down to 16.5 pounds with a Powertap.

The frame is pretty much as good as it gets when it comes to Aluminum ... and many like it over the CAAD10's carbon counterparts.

The bike is plenty good enough to race on.

With that said ... the biggest issue is whether the bike fits or not, or can be adjusted to fit. If it does ... go for it. If it's too aggressive, you might look at the aluminum Synapse or something similar with more laid back geometry.
 

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If it's too aggressive, you might look at the aluminum Synapse or something similar with more laid back geometry.
"Too aggressive:" LOL You might as well have told him "if you're not man enough, you can get that sissy bike over there with the streamers."

What Wookiebiker most likely meant is 1) if you need a shorter headtube (because you have long legs for your torso) check out the synapse.
or 2) if the bike feels a little twitchy for you you might check out the Synapse. (My caad5 was pretty twitchy - and I replaced the 45mm rake with a lighter 43mm rake which improved the ride -for me)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lol I could survive on less comfort than even a CAAD10. I did 85 miles with a 26 mile 6500 foot climb on this old steel road bike that puts every micro-bump right into your ass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I race Masters CAT 1/2/3 on a CAAD10 frame (with SRAM Rival) and it works great. I'm not really giving up anything of major consequence to others with nicer bikes since I also run 58mm Carbon Tubulars when I race, which brings the weight of the bike down to 16.5 pounds with a Powertap.

The frame is pretty much as good as it gets when it comes to Aluminum ... and many like it over the CAAD10's carbon counterparts.

The bike is plenty good enough to race on.

With that said ... the biggest issue is whether the bike fits or not, or can be adjusted to fit. If it does ... go for it. If it's too aggressive, you might look at the aluminum Synapse or something similar with more laid back geometry.
I've been stretching and working out my back so that being in an aerodynamic position isn't a problem. I can ride in the drops on my current bike pretty comfortably, though I can't get the bars down very low. The only problem with my current bike's geometry is that it's too big. Basically, I have to compromise between being too bent for my legs to not be digging way too far into my chest or not being aero. With the legs a bit closer to a vertical position above the bottom bracket than they are now with a longer stem, I should be a lot more comfortable leaning forward for very very long durations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have slightly shorter legs for my torso. I'm totally aiming for a long stem, I constantly feel the need to have my arms outstretched a bit farther, like I'd just be able to rest in that position for hours.
 

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CAAD10 is hard to beat. You can do it with Tiagra components. You'll be CAT5 so spend as much as you're able to. One of my buddies used to race crits on a Felt F95 with Sora components and a pair of 2008 Zipp 404s and he is doing very well in crits. My point is: No matter what you ride, you will start at CAT5. I've seen many racers at that level on the newer CAAD8s. Other options are the Felt F85/F75s, Specialized Allez, Trek Madone 2 series, and the Jamis Icon is a force rto be reckoned with I hear. How ever, they have less expensive alternatives that will make great crit machines for a CAT5 rider too. The best part is you will likely use many of these bikes through CAT4 as well.
 
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