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Kilt wearing, old man
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently, I partook of an adventure in bicycle camping/touring with ten other cyclists. Of the eleven of us, only our leader had any serious experience in self-contained, non-supported touring. This adventure was formally titled “Introduction to bicycle touring – Oregon” and was sponsored by the Adventure Cycling Association.

First, allow me to extend my thanks to the folks at ACA who put this trip together and the other cyclists who survived my cooking. :wink: Also thanks to our member, Kerry Irons, who allowed me to use one of the Adventure Cycling Association memberships he had available to gift earlier this year. I'm planning on renewing it at the appropriate time.

Intro to bike touring is as much a class as it is a journey. We met at Richardson County Park, by the Fern Ridge Reservoir, near Eugene, Oregon on the afternoon of Sunday, August 9th. Once everyone arrived and had set up their tents, our leader, Joyce Casey, conducted the first of our open-air classroom sessions. It was here that we were issued our t-shirts and reflective triangles. (ACA guidelines require that tour participants wear a helmet and display the triangle so that it is visible from behind the rider). This was followed by dinner, cooked by Joyce, then more class time



Day 1
Monday, we awoke early, and had breakfast at 7:00, thus setting the routine for the rest of our week. This was followed by even more class work, including a demonstration by Joyce of what her loaded bike was like.


We broke at noon for lunch, followed by you guessed it, more lessons. But this time, we had a field trip to Veneta, Oregon for a grocery run. Of course, The Lounge was represented. And a couple of the campers purchased additional supplies with their own funds, to share back at camp (alcohol is not allowed to be purchased with group funds). Then it was back to camp for dinner and another field trip, this time to the REI store in Eugene, where additional &/or different personal equipment was obtained by many.


Day 2
Shortly after the daily 8:00 map meeting, on Tuesday the 10th, we convoyed to the Eugene airport, where we would leave our cars in the long-term parking lot until our return on Friday.


From there, we zigzagged across the Willamette valley to the town of Monroe, where we pointed ourselves towards the coast range. This was where we encountered the worst climb of the entire trip. A two mile, 8% uphill grade that many of us walked. That is except for Joyce, two riders pulling BOBs and Pascal, on his recumbent.


Once we reached the summit, it was generally downhill for the next 15 miles, until our camp at the Salmonberry County Park campground, outside of Alsea, Oregon.


After a hearty dinner of tacos, beans and salad, it was time to sleep off the day's efforts.
 

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Kilt wearing, old man
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Day 3
Rise, shine, eat, fix lunch and snacks, and then break camp. The daily map meeting was conducted at 8:00, and after that, we were free to set off for our next destination. Generally speaking, we traveled at our own pace, but often several of us would be taking a break at the same location, with poor Joyce always playing the sweep.


Finally, as we neared our destination, I took a break along with one of our other riders, then set off for beautiful, metropolitan, Waldport.


We made camp at Beachside State Park just south of town on the 101 hwy. This being my turn to cook (along with two others), we rode back into town to purchase the supplies to make a wonderful beef stew with mashed potatoes, salad and rolls. Now anyone who has ever toured knows that you need to double the number of party members, just to have enough to satisfy their hunger. Alas, that evening it was overcast, so the long pants and jackets came out of the panniers.


Day 4
Our third day on the road dawned with light fog and overcast skies that would last until late morning. From Waldport, our route went south (with the prevailing winds to our back) to the town of Florence. This being the Oregon coast, there were still plenty of opportunities for photos.


In the early afternoon, we began to roll into Florence and meet up at Mo's restaurant for lunch. The first arrivals grabbed a table for six, and we kept it full for a couple of hours as one group would arrive, and eat, then leave just as the next group pulled in.


From Florence, it was another fourteen miles up the Siuslaw river to our final campsite in Mapleton. Here, we again dined out for our celebration dinner, and final class session.


Day 5
Friday the 13th dawned and we were soon on our way back to Eugene, via state hwy 36. But this day the weather was clear and warm. And before long, we were stopping to shed layers, as we rode past Christmas tree farms and pheasant farms.


I should point out that by this time our hill climbing had improved to the place where most of us were able to actually spin to the top (or nearly there) of today's worst climb.



From there on, it was generally downhill back to the Eugene airport. Once there, we unloaded our group gear, packed up our vehicles and said our good byes. Would I tour with any of these people again? Darned right. Would I go tomorrow? Sorry, but I have to be at work tomorrow. Maybe next month.
 

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Premium Member
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Wow you folks were hauling a lot of stuff.

Love the route, I've done it a few times.

Mo's! FTW!!!

Never knew you needed a lesson in how to tour.......
 

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Bacon!
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Pretty cool. I love looking through the A.C. catalogs at all their rides. I'm more of a hotel to hotel guy though :).
 

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Misfit Toy
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I want to do this.
 

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Kilt wearing, old man
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
YuriB, I think that was the whole purpose. We ran the gamut of riding and camping experience. This was a way to tie things together so that it somehow made sense.

Snap, I'm sure you would have enjoyed everything, except the hill climbs. Of course, I'd have ended up probably following you. :wink:

As for our tadpole operator. Well Pascal's rig had one of those Rholhoff (hope I spelled it right) hubs. And his gearing for granny low was equivalent to something like 19 gear inches. The hills took him a while to climb, but he made it up all of them. Maybe I'll be able to do the same once I trade out the small ring of my crankset for a 24 tooth ring. That'll change my low gear to 19.2 gear inches (current is 20.8). Of course, I could always change the rear gears to a 12-36 from the current 11-34. That would drop things to 18.1 gear inches. Great for climbing at a snail's pace.
 
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