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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
all included are:
# 11 Speed Rear Derailleur
# 11 Speed Braze On Front Derailleur
# 11 Speed Carbon Chainset
# 11 Speed Ultra-Shift Ergo Levers
# 11 Speed Cassette
# 11 Speed D-Skeleton Brake Calipers
# Ultra TorqueBaring Cups
# Record 11 Speed Chain
What do you think?

Also, can you work with the 11 speed chain without purchasing their $150 chain tool?
 

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That seems like the going rate for a Chorus 11 gruppo purchased through many of the UK/Euro sources like Ribble, Wiggle, Shiny Bikes, etc.

As far as the tool, it seems that most say that it's truly necessary as the secondary market (park tool, etc.) hasn't developed one yet.

You could always just have your LBS install the chain for you with THEIR $150 chain tool. Odds that break a chain on the road and have that tool with you are slim enough that you might be willing to take the chance until more affordable options come along.
 

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kjmunc said:
That seems like the going rate for a Chorus 11 gruppo purchased through many of the UK/Euro sources like Ribble, Wiggle, Shiny Bikes, etc.

As far as the tool, it seems that most say that it's truly necessary as the secondary market (park tool, etc.) hasn't developed one yet.

You could always just have your LBS install the chain for you with THEIR $150 chain tool. Odds that break a chain on the road and have that tool with you are slim enough that you might be willing to take the chance until more affordable options come along.
I was able to repair one of my 10s chains with a park mini chain tool when it broke. what's so different about this link that you couldn't make do in an emergency?

//PBK has Chorus 11 for $970 or so as I recall. It is a very good price compared to what they charge over here in the US.
 

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I'm basing my comments on 11-speed chains from what others have posted here and elsewhere, as I'm still a 10sp luddite.

I've not yet heard of anyone breaking an 11spd chain and providing feedback on the ease/difficulty of roadside fixing without the 11spd tool, but I'm sure it's possible given enough time and patience as apparently linking the 11spd chain the first time is a pain.
 

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$1000 plus or minus $50 is the going rate. I used Ribble and PBK to get all the parts. Neither had it all. I bought the chain tool for $142 at PBK and it is a fantastic tool. It is big and heavy and does a great job holding the chain in place while punching out a link and then pressing a pin in. The pin gets pressed in one direction and then you flip the tool around to flare the end of the pin. It's really not hard at all but I have a Park chain tool and a Rivoli and neither would work the same. The campy tool is necessary.

My chorus 11 has a record crank and I went with 12-27 cassettes. It's a 12-25 with a 27 on the end. So far so good.
 

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chaintool...

Bocephus Jones II said:
I was able to repair one of my 10s chains with a park mini chain tool when it broke. what's so different about this link that you couldn't make do in an emergency?

//PBK has Chorus 11 for $970 or so as I recall. It is a very good price compared to what they charge over here in the US.
Older chains tools may not fit the 11 speed chain, but a file can fix that. The problem is the U-shaped support will often touch the inner plate and not allow the outer plate to sit properly against the back of the tool. Then the link will sit crooked in the tool.

To test a tool for fit, put the chain in and apply a light pressure with the driving pin. The see if the inner plate is touching the U-shaped support. If it is, get out a file and make the support a little thinner. I've done this twice now to my Park CT-3, once for the 5.9mm 10 speed and again for the 11 speed.

A mod like this will allow the tool to break a chain or make a field repair, but won't help with flaring the right side of the new joining pin.

Some people have made their own flaring tool by grinding the tip of the driver to a 90 degree point, removing the U-shaped support near the back and then blocking off the back side of the tool, with a thin headed hex head bolt, placed in the thick U-shaped area.

FWIW, I'm using an 11 speed chain with one of the best fitting 5.9mm masterlinks, a wipperman connex 10S1. The SRAM poweloc 10, Forster superlink model 4 or the special KMC link made for the Campy UN chain would fit the same. There's about 1/3 too much side clearance, but so far, it's caused no problem.
 

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bigbill said:
$1000 plus or minus $50 is the going rate. I used Ribble and PBK to get all the parts. Neither had it all. I bought the chain tool for $142 at PBK and it is a fantastic tool. It is big and heavy and does a great job holding the chain in place while punching out a link and then pressing a pin in. The pin gets pressed in one direction and then you flip the tool around to flare the end of the pin. It's really not hard at all but I have a Park chain tool and a Rivoli and neither would work the same. The campy tool is necessary.

My chorus 11 has a record crank and I went with 12-27 cassettes. It's a 12-25 with a 27 on the end. So far so good.
Could you "make do" on the road with a standard Park mini tool though or is the link design so different you couldn't MacGuyver it on the road? All I'd want to do is get home if I broke a chain--I'm sure you can't carry that heavy beast with you when you're riding. What happens if your chain breaks. Though rare, it happens.
 

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Bocephus Jones II said:
Could you "make do" on the road with a standard Park mini tool though or is the link design so different you couldn't MacGuyver it on the road? All I'd want to do is get home if I broke a chain--I'm sure you can't carry that heavy beast with you when you're riding. What happens if your chain breaks. Though rare, it happens.
If I was doing a ride further than a cell phone call away from being picked up, I would carry a standard chain tool to punch out a link and a ten speed Wipperman or SRAM link. You can get home on a shorter chain, but you have to live with it after that. Campy says that you can only replace the pin once after initial install. With the 11 speed tolerances so tight, I have to believe them. In a year or so we should see aftermarket 11 chains.
 

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info...

Bocephus Jones II said:
Could you "make do" on the road with a standard Park mini tool though or is the link design so different you couldn't MacGuyver it on the road? All I'd want to do is get home if I broke a chain--I'm sure you can't carry that heavy beast with you when you're riding. What happens if your chain breaks. Though rare, it happens.
See my earlier comments regarding the chain tool.
 

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C-40 said:
See my earlier comments regarding the chain tool.
aha...I didn't read close enough. I would want to have something to make an emergency repair if needed. Sounds like you could mod a regular chain tool enough to get you home.
 
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