Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Does anyone think that storing bikes in an unheated garage in freezing temperatures is bad for bikes? I'm currently looking at all the indoor storage options, but before I buy anything I wanted to see what others thought about storing my bikes in my unheated garage during the winter. I live in Lake Tahoe and the temperature range of my garage during the winter ranges from 10 to maybe 40 degrees.
My wife and I have 5 bikes between us, so I'll inevitably be storing my racing bikes inside year round due to my love for them and for extra garage space.
Thanks.
 

· Lexicon Devil
Joined
·
964 Posts
Your bearings are going to be stiff, because grease becomes more viscous at lower temperatures. If your bikes are steel, I'd use some Weigle Framesaver on them so that they protected from condensation and temperature swings.

Other than that, I'd say you're good to go. Bikes ain't that fragile.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
6,492 Posts
I live in Verdi, between Reno and Truckee, and mine (all steel except for one Cannondale MB) have been outside under a patio cover or in an unheated shed year round for periods ranging from three to 18 years. No problems at all, though I do agree about using Frame Saver or something to prevent damage from condensation.
There's even an argument that you SHOULD keep them outside, because when you bring them in, the tubes fill up with warm, moist air, which chills when you ride so the water condenses over and over.
 

· Frog Whisperer
Joined
·
41,516 Posts
Cory said:
I live in Verdi, between Reno and Truckee, and mine (all steel except for one Cannondale MB) have been outside under a patio cover or in an unheated shed year round for periods ranging from three to 18 years. No problems at all, though I do agree about using Frame Saver or something to prevent damage from condensation.
There's even an argument that you SHOULD keep them outside, because when you bring them in, the tubes fill up with warm, moist air, which chills when you ride so the water condenses over and over.

hey...just a thought...rusting is the iron in the steel oxidizing, since there isn't a lot of air moving through a frame, wouldn't rust be kind of self limiting? Out of O2 no more rust....or is my logic flawed?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
14,776 Posts
flawed logic

Touch0Gray said:
hey...just a thought...rusting is the iron in the steel oxidizing, since there isn't a lot of air moving through a frame, wouldn't rust be kind of self limiting? Out of O2 no more rust....or is my logic flawed?
Maybe not "a lot" of air - but enough exchange to keep the process going indefinitely. Frame tubes have openings.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
The only thing worse is ...

The only thing worse is ...

taking them inside. Like the previous post said, if you bring them inside after cold rides you'll have more condensation inside the tubes than if you leave them in the garage. Also, warmer temperatures speed up oxidation. Either way, the rusting probably will be minor, but cold storage is better.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
Mayday said:
The only thing worse is ...

taking them inside. Like the previous post said, if you bring them inside after cold rides you'll have more condensation inside the tubes than if you leave them in the garage. Also, warmer temperatures speed up oxidation. Either way, the rusting probably will be minor, but cold storage is better.
So keep your bikes cold, and your beers colder.
 

· Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
13,390 Posts
OK! I want to set this straight once and for all! Carbon Fiber will NOT shatter in cold temps. What actually happens in temps of 10 C or below is the carbon fiber matrix loses its elasticity. Because it's no longer elastic, or able to flex, the motion of the electrons in the carbon create much more friction that they do at more temperate temperatures. Because increased friction = more heat, what really happens is they burst into flames. In fact (and this has been proven in many, many studies with 0 sample sizes), if it gets really cold they can actually become explosive. My advice? Keep it warm. If that sucker gets too cold, well....stand back!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top