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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a new steel frame and haven't built it up yet. Is rust proofing the inside necessary? The only time the bike is ever going to be outside is when I'm sitting on it. Then again, the stuff is $12 and takes an hour or two to apply.
 

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I bought a new steel frame and haven't built it up yet. Is rust proofing the inside necessary? The only time the bike is ever going to be outside is when I'm sitting on it. Then again, the stuff is $12 and takes an hour or two to apply.
If the frame is bare, its really easy to do. Its $12 worth of insurance on a $2500 frame. No brainer
 

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If you're asking now, you'll be asking yourself again after you've built it up. Just do it now while is a bare frame and have peace of mind.
 

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There is absolutely NO justifiable reason not to put some kind of frame saver on that frame.

If you don't do it, you'll almost surely regret it later.
 

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pmf, when you do it wipe as much of it off the exterior of the frame before it dries. If you miss some, WD-40 does a good job removing it. It's not a hard job at all, but it can be messy. Do it somewhere we you can make a mess (not on that table)
 

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I bought a new steel frame and haven't built it up yet. Is rust proofing the inside necessary? The only time the bike is ever going to be outside is when I'm sitting on it. Then again, the stuff is $12 and takes an hour or two to apply.
I see no reason not to do it. It's just $12 and an hour of your time, it's definitely worth it for the peace of mind alone.
 

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Yes. The first time you bring your shiny bike outside on a hot summer day with the frame still cool from the air conditioned interior and watch the condensation form on the frame, you will realize yu made a wise decision.
 

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pmf, when you do it wipe as much of it off the exterior of the frame before it dries. If you miss some, WD-40 does a good job removing it. It's not a hard job at all, but it can be messy. Do it somewhere we you can make a mess (not on that table)
Exactly. But don't let it dry overnight. It gets real difficult to remove, the longer it sits.
Give it an hour or two to set up after you spray, then clean.
 

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I bought a new steel frame and haven't built it up yet. Is rust proofing the inside necessary? The only time the bike is ever going to be outside is when I'm sitting on it. Then again, the stuff is $12 and takes an hour or two to apply.
Really easy and cheap insurance, but it depends on your definition of necessary. If the frame was prepared correctly for painting and cleaned afterwards you have a different situation than if various corrosives were left inside the tubes. If you live in Arizona, condensation inside the frame will probably never happen so "it depends."

BTW you don't need custom frame prep for this task. Any spray lube will coat the metal and leave a coating that will protect it. Even the oft-reviled WD-40 can be sprayed down the tubes and the oil that is left after the solvent evaporates does a good job of protecting steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the advice. It's not my kitchen table. It's Mike at Maestro's table.

Definitely plan to do it outside on a warm day. So the stuff hardens up? So what about the bottom bracket? Don't want to get it in the threads? Or the head tube? Will it make it harder to install a headset? Maybe WD-40 sounds more attractive. Or even boiled linseed oil?
 

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Thanks for all the advice. It's not my kitchen table. It's Mike at Maestro's table.

Definitely plan to do it outside on a warm day. So the stuff hardens up? So what about the bottom bracket? Don't want to get it in the threads? Or the head tube? Will it make it harder to install a headset? Maybe WD-40 sounds more attractive. Or even boiled linseed oil?
Linseed oil is likely messier than Weigle. I am not sure WD-40 offers the same protection. I did not mean to scare you. Its not like pouring super glue into your BB threads. You wipe it down after you are done, grease the BB like you normally would and all is well. I've done it a couple of times and its pretty simple. The stuff is in a solvent which dries up and leaves a thin film. You squirt the stuff in the tubes, put some rags in the openings to soak up excess and twirl the frame around like a baton to get it all over inside
 

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I won't argue against it but I have 7 steel frames between 25 and 30 years old and they are all just fine without any evidence of any kind of frame saver. It is an Arabesque though, probably something you might want your grandkids to have.
 

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It's cheap and take your time

I just finished my new steel ride using a can of framesaver I've had for 20 years. Iron Groundcover Metal Shrub Garden Bicycle frame Line Teal Parallel Triangle

No, you do not want to get it on the threads of the BB. I put masking tape into the HT, where the TT and DT are joined, a newspaper plug at the top of the seat tube and then preform some newpaper plugs for the BB area, one for the ST, one for the DT and one each for the chainstays. I then apply the framesaver one tube at a time from the BB area, plug and then rotate the frame around. Seatstay treatment will depend on if there are brazing relief holes by which to access the seatstays.

Once the stays and main tubes are dried, overnight, you can do the headtube. If you use news paper plugs for each end of the headtube, you will generally minimise the framesaver getting onto the area where the headset cups are placed. For the BB area that is not threaded, I use a qtip and the drip the frame saver onto the qtip and manually apply.

Fork steerer should be done as well as the crown. To the extent there is access to the fork legs, those as well.

All that being said, I've owned a number of steel frames and only one has had bad rust on the inside of the tubes. That was a Gios Torino Super Record I bought in 1975, my main ride for 25 years and seat stays got it badly.

Peter Weigle framesavered my last NOS steelie, a 753 Merckx that I had him coldset the rear to 130mm. He no longer owns the product FWIW.

Mike at Maestro is a good guy. I have actually been down to his shop when I lived in London and bought a C40 from him.

Thanks for all the advice. It's not my kitchen table. It's Mike at Maestro's table.

Definitely plan to do it outside on a warm day. So the stuff hardens up? So what about the bottom bracket? Don't want to get it in the threads? Or the head tube? Will it make it harder to install a headset? Maybe WD-40 sounds more attractive. Or even boiled linseed oil?
 

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Boeshield T-9 is another spray to consider. Several custom frame builders apply T-9 to their frames before shipping to the customers. T-9 is not as messy as Framesaver.

Good-looking Colnago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks all. I "Weigled" the frame this weekend. Geez, talk about over thinking this. It took a few minutes. Really easy to do. The mechanic at the LBS said don't worry about the BB threads, its nothing we can't ream out. I might hit it again when I get home tonight.
 
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